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Posted: 12/6/2013 12:00:26 PM EST
So my father is retiring from Police Dep't and he always wanted a Lever Action. I have decided to get him the nicest Winchester Pre 64 I can find and want to have it Hard Chrome plated (Probably by APWCogan). I am not concerned about hurting value or anything as this rifle will hopefully be passed down through the family so I really want to personalize it. Can anyone recommend an engraver? Haven't decided what I will have engraved (maybe family crest or something), would it have to be done before plating? Would love to see some engraved weapons for inspiration if you guys got em.
Link Posted: 12/6/2013 2:26:59 PM EST
The only one I know is in Richmond Hill Ga, named Yves Halliburton. His website is
www.gunengraver.us.
He does a lot of levergun refurb and custom embellishment. His workshop looks like a
dentist office. Even has a roller for gold thread to enlay.

Check the website, hope this helps.
scruff
Link Posted: 12/6/2013 11:14:18 PM EST
The only engraved lever actions I've seen are from Henry, their Deluxe rifles are really nice. They also make a specific rifle that's for law enforcement officers and they can also do engraving and stuff not shown on the website. I know that's not what you are looking for but its an option.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 3:05:13 AM EST
Nice, I will look into both of those suggestions.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 10:01:04 AM EST
Another traditional option is to have a brass or even nickel plate engraved and mounted on/in the stock.
You can attach a plate TO the stock with brass screws, or inlet it into the wood and use screws or an epoxy glue.
Yet another option, which I've done a few times is to soft solder a plate on the receiver. This won't work if you're going to have the receiver hard chrome plated, but you could pre-drill and tap for mounting screws then have it plated.

Depending on whether you want real hand engraving or machine engraving, many local jewelry stores and sports trophy stores do machine engraving in various font styles. It's not as classy as hand engraving, but it's much less expensive and faster to get done.
If you want real hand engraving, it's far faster and cheaper to get done then sending an entire gun to an engraver.
Again, a few local jewelery stores have people who can do brass plate engraving on-site, and most all can send a plate out to have it hand engraved. Just make it clear you want hand engraving, not machine.

For a plate, you can use thick brass shim stock or thicker brass plate, which looks nicer, or nickel plate which is available from many knife maker supply houses like Jantz Supply and Texas Knifemaker's Supply..
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 4:58:15 PM EST
Wow, these are some fantastic ideas here! I never even thought about local jewelry store for engraving.
Link Posted: 12/8/2013 9:07:52 AM EST
Most trophy shops I've dealt with wont do guns at all; same with jewelers. I'd look at Ident or Gray laser engravers or one of the other companies that do NFA laser engraving. Stuff looks awesome and comes out looking SHARP.
Link Posted: 12/8/2013 9:59:59 AM EST
To be clear, most jewelery stores are not set up to do guns, and the pantograph engraving machines can't do very deep engraving.
Many of the machines can't grip and hold a gun.
Most steel engraving is on the backs of stainless watch cases and it's soft enough the machine engraving looks okay.
On a gun, it won't do very well and will be thin.
Few jewelery hand engravers are set up to do engraving on gun type steels. This requires different tooling and techniques then jewelery work.

Where the jewelry store or trophy shop can do a good job is on brass and nickel plates.
Link Posted: 12/8/2013 10:16:17 AM EST
Well done OP.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 11:06:12 AM EST
You've gotten some good advice.

Scratching up the receiver in addition to the engraving costs would also involve the gunsmith charges for pulling the barrel and disassembling and reassembling of the rifle. Engraving a plate and having it either inlaid into the stock or pinned on would not only be traditional but would also be much more economical. Over the years I've done quite a few for folks. Here's one I did in silver for my wife's first CAS rifle, a Rossi '92 in 357.



When she started having trouble with it, I found a like new '66 carbine for her. Here's how it looks after I got done scratching it up.




Link Posted: 12/11/2013 12:11:53 PM EST
Poco, that is amazing looking!!
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 2:23:09 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Poco:
You've gotten some good advice.

Scratching up the receiver in addition to the engraving costs would also involve the gunsmith charges for pulling the barrel and disassembling and reassembling of the rifle. Engraving a plate and having it either inlaid into the stock or pinned on would not only be traditional but would also be much more economical. Over the years I've done quite a few for folks. Here's one I did in silver for my wife's first CAS rifle, a Rossi '92 in 357.

<a href="http://s255.photobucket.com/user/poco47/media/ssrb.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/poco47/ssrb.jpg</a>

When she started having trouble with it, I found a like new '66 carbine for her. Here's how it looks after I got done scratching it up.

<a href="http://s255.photobucket.com/user/poco47/media/66rtpb.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/poco47/66rtpb.jpg</a>

<a href="http://s255.photobucket.com/user/poco47/media/66lftpb.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/poco47/66lftpb.jpg</a>
View Quote


Wow! Do you have pictures of your other work?
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 2:55:03 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Wow! Do you have pictures of your other work?
View Quote




I do. Here's a few more:











Link Posted: 12/13/2013 1:15:52 AM EST
Gorgeous.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 6:35:15 PM EST
nice work
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