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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/10/2010 1:17:37 PM EDT
Gonna start loading for the .41 mag. Nosler book calls for a Federal 150 primer which is a large pistol primer. Local gunshop only had Federal large magnum pistol primers. They had some Winchester large pistol primers and they say on the box, "for large pistol or large magnum pistol." Should I be scared to use the Federal large magnum pistol primer in an application that only calls for a large pistol primer? I can't see there being too much difference in them. And being its a pistol I doubt I'd be able to detect too much difference in accuracy. Any suggestions or wisdom yall like share with me?
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 2:06:30 PM EDT
This is of interest to me also
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 3:10:45 PM EDT
just start 1/2 to 1 grain lower than your normal load and work up. I mean load 10 at -1 gr 10 at -1/2 gr and 10 at your normal load. Then you will have your answer. Should be no problem.
Link Posted: 9/10/2010 6:45:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 7:55:57 AM EDT
fwiw, i have loaded 41 mag for over 25 years, primarily use Fed 150 with H110, I know it goes against all wisdom, but it works great, most accurate revolver round in my Ruger Redhawk 41R by far, I would back off a grain for 155's
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 8:32:31 AM EDT
Using magnum primers is driven more by the powder being used than 'Magnum' in the cartridge name.

Ball (and some other) powders are harder to light, especially when the ammunition is cold.

The extra heat from a magnum primer is warranted.

For many other powders they are not needed.

A typical starting load is low enough you can work up from there.

You might reach max slightly early in load development.


Link Posted: 9/11/2010 8:36:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Using magnum primers is driven more by the powder being used than 'Magnum' in the cartridge name.

Ball (and some other) powders are harder to light, especially when the ammunition is cold.

The extra heat from a magnum primer is warranted.

For many other powders they are not needed.

A typical starting load is low enough you can work up from there.

You might reach max slightly early in load development.



When I load .44 plinking charges I use titegroup which is easy to ignite. When I use H110 for full power loads to make sure to get ignition. Never tried regular primers with H110, but I'd hate to not have a round go off when I was trying to shoot a trophy animal.
Link Posted: 9/11/2010 12:55:47 PM EDT
I've had trouble when using non-magnum primers with Blue Dot, slow ignitions and one squib. Never a problem with magnum primers.

Anything slower than AA#7 and I will use a magnum primer (or Win LP) regardless of what the data says.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 8:45:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Using magnum primers is driven more by the powder being used than 'Magnum' in the cartridge name.

Ball (and some other) powders are harder to light, especially when the ammunition is cold.

The extra heat from a magnum primer is warranted.

For many other powders they are not needed.

A typical starting load is low enough you can work up from there.

You might reach max slightly early in load development.

What brickeyee said!

Also, I've found that while non-magnum primers may light a given powder charge completely, a magnum primer will consistently give me slightly higher velocities and lower standard deviations (SD) with all my various loads. My chrono has shown me that my all my handloads in all my calibers benefit to some degree using magnum primers. My 38spl+P, 357mag, 40s&w, 45acp, 45acp+, 10mm, 30carb, .223, and 5.56 loads all have lower SDs when using magnum primers. I've come to the conclusion that magnum primers are a good choice for all my loads, however, as brickeyee said, I find that my max loads usually come in using slightly less powder than reloading book max powder amounts.
Link Posted: 9/12/2010 9:24:23 AM EDT
Not large primers but I prefer Rem 5 1/2 SP mag primers over Rem 1 1/2 SP regular primers even using Tite Group, they just seem to shoot better.
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