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11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 9/16/2004 3:29:17 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2004 3:35:54 AM EST by Cincinnatus]
Johnson M1941 semiautomatic rifle (USA)


close-up view on the receiver and magazine of M1941. Note the horizontal loading gate with stripper clip guides, located between the magazine and the bolt handle / ejection slot.

schematic drawing of the M1941 rotary magazine, from Johnson's patent

Caliber: .30-06 (7.62x63mm)
Action: short recoil operated, rotating bolt
Overall length: 1156 mm
Barrel length: 558 mm
Weight: 4.3 kg empty
Magazine capacity: 10 rounds


Does anyone have one?
Has anyone shot one?
What are they like $7K?
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 3:33:01 AM EST

Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:
Johnson M1941 semiautomatic rifle (USA)
world.guns.ru/rifle/johnson1941.jpg
world.guns.ru/rifle/johnson1941r.jpg
close-up view on the receiver and magazine of M1941. Note the horizontal loading gate with stripper clip guides, located between the magazine and the bolt handle / ejection slot.
world.guns.ru/rifle/johnson1941mag_p.jpg
schematic drawing of the M1941 rotary magazine, from Johnson's patent

Caliber: .30-06 (7.62x63mm)
Action: short recoil operated, rotating bolt
Overall length: 1156 mm
Barrel length: 558 mm
Weight: 4.3 kg empty
Magazine capacity: 10 rounds


Does anyone have one?
Has anyone shot one?
What are they like $7K?

Link Posted: 9/16/2004 6:03:20 AM EST
My father has one. Standard military version in .30-06, with bayonet, about in rack grade condition (ala CMP grading).

I have shot it. It's a VERY interesting rifle, and not a bad performer. The Garand is a much more refined gun overall, but the Johnson ran .30 M2 ammo right out and did what it was designed to do quite well. The QD barrel is WAY cool. The "pregnant" mag is kinda odd, but it doesn't get in the way at all and isn't unbalanced or anything. You don't notice it's there, and using two stripper clips to load it was fairly easy. You can load the ten round mag while you keep one in the chamber ready to go, and you can also load loose rounds to top-off the mag anytime you want. The sights are easy to use and good practical combat sights. They aren't as good target sights as the M1, but they're probably better combat sights. They are adjustable for range with a slider and windage with a drum, with a large peep rear. Nothing fancy, but nothing lacking either. A great choice for what it was made for. The bayonet was a spike-like deal that seemed more of an afterthought.

The rifle used the same receiver as the LMG (except for some extra milling on the LMG for the full-auto stuff), and it's a strong rifle. They're fantastic collectables, but you really don't need to worry about shooting them and hurting them. Parts are very hard to find nowdays, but there's not much that will break if you take care of it. I have no doubt that my father's M1941 will outlast him, and likely me as well.

They are around 3 Grand (not Garand) last time I checked, which was last year sometime. That's a pretty high pricetag, but they're getting quite rare. They have a uniqe combination of history, usefullness, collectability and shootability that just isn't there in other rifles.

Ross
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 6:49:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2004 6:49:54 AM EST by SP10]
I picked one up at a very nice price a couple years ago, and later ended up reselling it to a collector. A dealer at the Syracuse gunshow usually has 2-3 in inventory, pricing pushing 4K+. Neat, rare rifles.

I never shot the rifle. Didn't want to get too attached to it

Bruce Canfield (IIRC) has a definitive book out on the Johnson rifle.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 7:25:38 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 8:17:16 AM EST
Did ya'll know Melvin Johnson designed and patented the rotary lug bolt and barrel extension design (in the late 1930's) that the AR rifles use ?!!
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 9:16:27 AM EST
Marine Raiders carried them.
Pretty cool.
I want one.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 1:17:42 PM EST
Back in the late '40s or early '50s they were advertised in outdoor magazines and Popular Mechanix for 60 to 70 dollars. However, I must add that was probably two weeks pay for most people.

Regards,
Mild Bill
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 1:44:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By raf:
Seen 'em and the LMGs also. Built just up the road a piece.

Ross gave a good thumbnail sketch. I would add that the bayonet was literally an afterthought, and is not robust. It is also sometimes problematic when firing, as it was made light so as to not add too much reciprocating mass to the barrel. This worked better on some rifles than others.



The military required that the rifle mount a bayonet so Johnson came up with the most minimal thing that would still meet the criteria and would allow the weapon to function!
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