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Posted: 8/3/2004 3:16:03 PM EDT
When would it happen? How many rounds/what test would I have to put through it to find out whether I got a good one or not?
Link Posted: 8/3/2004 3:23:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/3/2004 5:58:20 PM EDT
I think I'll have to order one but thanks for the info Chuck. I made it (slow fire) through a string this past weekend and wanted to know what more I needed to do.

Thanks again.
jim
Link Posted: 8/3/2004 7:03:51 PM EDT
Soon after I got my first M1A, even though it was mostly USGI, I asked this board what spare parts should I keep on hand. Fulton Armory offers a USGI bolt rebuild kit which is a good item to have. It includes a firing pin, extractor, ejector, pins, springs, roller, clip, etc. All of my M1As continue to run great, but I did have a friend's Scout break an extractor when he was visiting me this spring (a TRW bolt, go figure...), so the kit came in handy.
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 3:06:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 5:26:43 AM EDT
Most of the time if you have a screwed up Springfield M1a you will know it the first time you shoot it.

There is one problem they have had recently that involves recievers that are out of spec inside the rear where the rear bolt lugs run in the grooves in the reciever.

If you have this problem it will not show up for a while and when it does you bolt will lock to the rear and your shooting will be over untill they replace the reciever.
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 1:04:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cornbread2:
Most of the time if you have a screwed up Springfield M1a you will know it the first time you shoot it.

There is one problem they have had recently that involves recievers that are out of spec inside the rear where the rear bolt lugs run in the grooves in the reciever.

If you have this problem it will not show up for a while and when it does you bolt will lock to the rear and your shooting will be over untill they replace the reciever.



Just curious, any way to tell if it's out of spec beforehand? Test or something...?
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 2:56:35 PM EDT
Just ONE data point here, but the bolt roller (commercial) in my M1A sheered off after around 600 rounds. It is at SAI right now being fixed.

As to the answer to your question of how many rounds will it last, the more USGI parts in your gun the longer the likelihood that it will run without problems. That being said, NO ONE can predict when something is going to fail, stuff happens. It may happen on the first round or the 100,000. The only way to find out is to go out and shoot it until it breaks. I know, not the answer you were looking for, but it is how it is.
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 4:05:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cnorton:
Just ONE data point here, but the bolt roller (commercial) in my M1A sheered off after around 600 rounds. It is at SAI right now being fixed.

As to the answer to your question of how many rounds will it last, the more USGI parts in your gun the longer the likelihood that it will run without problems. That being said, NO ONE can predict when something is going to fail, stuff happens. It may happen on the first round or the 100,000. The only way to find out is to go out and shoot it until it breaks. I know, not the answer you were looking for, but it is how it is.



cnorton, that's how it is with any gun. I hear all these dreadful things about the SAs and merely wanted to know how I'd know if it was a POS or not.
Link Posted: 8/4/2004 6:45:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By macman37:


Just curious, any way to tell if it's out of spec beforehand? Test or something...?



Remove the stock and turn the rifle over and look inside the rear of the reciever.

Notice that there are grooves in the rear of the reciever.

Notice that there are lugs on the rear of the bolt that ride in the reciever grooves.

If your reciever is made correctly the bolt lugs will ride DEEPLY in the grooves. So deep that with the bolt to all the way to the rear you will not be able to see the bolt lugs or just bearly see them. You should be able to see that it would be impossible for them to jump track.

If the bolt lugs just bearly fit into the grooves where it looks like the could come out after just a bit of wear on the reciever you have a problem.
Link Posted: 8/5/2004 8:49:18 AM EDT
Cornbread, that was EXACTLY what I was looking for. Thanks.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 1:35:13 PM EDT
Cornbread,

had it apart the other night. Turned it over and observed the bolt going back into the receiver - grooves are deep and in fact there was a little extra room in there.

You have assuaged my fears. Thanks again.

I do plan on taking 6 or 7 mags worth of ammo to the range soon and having fun/testing it out. THEN I will probably bump it up to "primary" in my battery.
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