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Posted: 1/25/2011 3:57:52 PM EDT
Every single day, both of my kids ask to help me do "reloading stuff".  And every single time, they argue over who gets to help me put shells in and work the press.  

I guess there's only one solution... buy another press, so there's one for each of them.  
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 4:17:11 PM EDT
[#1]
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 4:27:36 PM EDT
[#2]
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 4:32:04 PM EDT
[#3]
The consequences of a mistake in reloading can range from mere inconvenience to serious injury and/or death. I have been reloading since I was maybe eight or nine years old, first under supervision, and then on my own. I understood the consequences of mistakes and erred on the side of caution. If your kids are mature enough to do the same, good. If not, close supervision is in order, and that's going to be difficult with two to watch.



JMO.
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 5:53:54 PM EDT
[#4]
Wow....this thread got pretty serious real fast... I started operating heavy farm equipment at the age of 12. By age 13, 100 hour work weeks were normal during planting & harvest seasons. By age 16, I could operate combines & over the road tractor, trailers. I just wish my Dad had spent time hunting, fishing, and reloading. We worked...Today I'm 47 & my boy is 23. We are 750 miles apart
& he's due for 3rd deployment to Iraq in May. God bless and keep our Snipers.... Our best memories have been behind a press or gun. If he called today and said, hey Dad come to Texas next week. We'll reload and do some shooting. I'd be gone in a Kansas City minute... Point is responsibility is taught with patience and a watchful eye. I applaud what you're doing and suggest for now at YOUR experience level that one press be enough. Have fun and God Bless your family.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 6:26:23 PM EDT
[#5]
This is how I learned when I was 8 or 9. My dads 1st cousin who is a very ornary old man that doesn't like anyone took a liking to me and taught me how to reload, shoot, hunt, and fish. My dad has never been much into shooting. He enjoys bird hunting but then he buys the shells and then he is done. He has alot of guns but they are only high dollar shotguns and I think that is just because he doesn't enjoy buying anything else. This old man took me under his wing and taught me everything I know now which isn't much. When I turned 23 I decided I wanted to get a reloading set up of my own and went and bought a Rockchucker because I knew if I didn't buy it he would try to give me one. I bought the press and the bench and alot of other odds and ends and then called him to help me set it up. When he came over he knew that my best shooting rifle was a old Sako Deluxe .222 and he brought me 200 pieces of brass a 1000 primers 200 bullets and 1lb of powder that he had helped me develop up the load for that gun with. He still helps me anytime I need a little help. He is who has gave me this expensive habit that my wife cannot stand but if it wasn't for him taking me at a young age and showing me how to do everything he did I would not have this wonderful hobby today. Him teaching me to reload is where I believe I got alot of my diligence and patience from. He always beat it into me if you get into a hurry your reloads aren't going to be worth a plug nickel and you will be better off going and buying that cheap assembly line crap at wal-mart. He has gotten up in years but I still see him often and will always be greatful to him for that. There is no telling how many 1000's of dollars he has given me in components, ammo, knifes, and paper we have punched together and from all of that I have something I hope to be able to pass on to my kids one day. I think what you are doign is great. As long as your kids will listen you are doing a great thing that alot of kids are not fortunate enough to have.
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:20:04 PM EDT
[#6]
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:24:02 PM EDT
[#7]
My thirteen year old was loading when she was eight. This Christmas she came up to me and said "Dad show them ( my nieces and nephews ) how we make ammo. I brought all six of them down to the man cave and showed them how to load ammo. They were amazed at what they saw. They sat in their chairs and stared.
We had three mothers looking for their kids because it was the only time they were quite all night.
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 7:40:47 PM EDT
[#8]
Thanks to everyone for the words of caution, they are sincerely appreciated.

So far, our reloading sessions have consisted of them sitting on my lap, and they've been limited to depriming and sizing, while I carefully watch everything they do.  I've concentrated on teaching them these things:

1.  You can have your hand in the press (inserting shell, removing shell, etc.), OR you can have your hand on the lever... but not both.

2.  If the press feels like it's taking too much effort, stop and check things.

3.  Watch each operation and make sure that each operation is complete, don't short-stroke it.

They still love it, and I have to go back and forth letting each of them take turns.  Whether that will continue as time goes on, we'll just have to wait and see.  
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 8:05:38 PM EDT
[#9]
Don't let them do the reloading.

Have them do ancillary stuff like checking the concentricity of the sized cases, check length of brass so you know which need trimming, weigh the brass and bullets, segregate into groups and record the results.  Use them in non-critical jobs that supplement what you are already doing. Sizing and trimming come to mind.
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 9:41:22 PM EDT
[#10]
Quoted:
Don't let them do the reloading.

Have them do ancillary stuff like checking the concentricity of the sized cases, check length of brass so you know which need trimming, weigh the brass and bullets, segregate into groups and record the results.  Use them in non-critical jobs that supplement what you are already doing. Sizing and trimming come to mind.


I agree, heck I started my wife off using calipers and gave her a number for OAL and as the press spit them out she would say this one or that one is either too short or too long, I also would have her drop the finished rounds in a case gage it was never about having help as much as having company, have fun teach them right and enjoy
Link Posted: 1/25/2011 9:59:12 PM EDT
[#11]
Mine like to pull the handle on the press also, just have to make them take turnes.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 12:11:12 AM EDT
[#12]
Kids can be very helpful. I have a bullet feeder for my Dillon and in four more years I will have a case feeder too.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 5:25:55 AM EDT
[#13]
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 5:58:03 AM EDT
[#14]
Quoted:
Kids can be very helpful. I have a bullet feeder for my Dillon and in four more years I will have a case feeder too.


This is true... I have a bullet feeder in training currently... I'm the case feeder for the time being.

I need to find really small latex gloves... the XS size is still to large on my bullet feeders little paws.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 6:14:24 AM EDT
[#15]
You didn't mention how old they are and it does make a difference...

You also didn't mention weather you are loading rifle or pistol rounds also makes a differnece...

put the kids on case prep detail and avoid another press for the time being.  One can monitor the tumbler while its running, one can trim cases.  Get a zip trim and the lee case length gage and it is almost idiot proof.

They also make GREAT brass sorters.

I agree no powder or primers untill they demonstrate they are responsible and careful enough for that.  Take it slow and enjoy the quality time teaching your children a great and rewarding skill.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 7:44:30 AM EDT
[#16]
Watch out for unwanted press handle deployment.  My 2 year old pulled the lever as I was dropping a bullet out of a collet bullet puller. OUCH.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 8:30:14 AM EDT
[#17]
Congratulations on getting the next generation going. I often ask myself, is stuff like this dying out.  Then people like you come along and show me that no it is not.  My 4 year old helps me sorting and resizing.  Thanks for passing it on!
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 9:14:08 AM EDT
[#18]
my boy loves helping me with the reloading! he is almost 2 now.
no I don't let him do anything dangerous or that could compromise the quality of my reloads. but I think it is a great way to bond and get him into the shooting heritage mindset early.
he knows all the steps!
he does alot of the depriming. I have a universal decapper, and he puts the shell in, pops out the primer and hands me the case to put in the done box.
case prep, he hands me a shell out of the box, I put the caliper on it while he grabs the trimmer and hands it to me. I trim the case and he hands me the deburing tool. I debur and he puts the shell in the "done" box.
loading, he hands me a primed case, I throw the charge, he hands me a bullet out of the box and I seat it.

the look on his face through out the process is a mixture of awe, pride, joy and concentration. It takes ALOT longer to do it with him helping, but we both love it, and I love that he wants to do it with me.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 9:42:52 AM EDT
[#19]
Quoted:
Congratulations on getting the next generation going. I often ask myself, is stuff like this dying out.  Then people like you come along and show me that no it is not.  My 4 year old helps me sorting and resizing.  Thanks for passing it on!


+100

although Im sure the bedwetting, hippy liberals will condemn you as a bad parent.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 10:31:41 AM EDT
[#20]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Congratulations on getting the next generation going. I often ask myself, is stuff like this dying out.  Then people like you come along and show me that no it is not.  My 4 year old helps me sorting and resizing.  Thanks for passing it on!


+100

although Im sure the bedwetting, hippy liberals will condemn you as a bad parent.


+100

My friends kids love to help, so they sort, clean, inspect.  They really get a kick shooting a cartridge that they assembled themselves.  Also, their eyes ar emuch better at spotting things that should not pass inspection - amazing how proud they are to help, to take on the responsibility.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 1:27:52 PM EDT
[#21]
While I wouldn't let two kids help me reload at the same time, my 9 year old girl  has been helping me size brass since she was 7.  She has a great time, and has gotten to the point where she stops pulling the handle if it seems too hard, and makes sure the handle goes all the way down each time.  I supervise the entire time, of course, and I wouldn't let most kids that age handle primers or powder (and she's no exception), but resizing brass is easy to do and easy to check later for any mistakes (i.e. case gage and visual inspection).  It's the pre-work setup that is the most critical step, IMO.



My 14 yr old boy does powder and primers with me as well, again, under my supervision and with safety glasses.  He is very detail oriented, maybe even more than I am.



It's a great hobby to share with your kids so long as it's done safely...



Link Posted: 1/26/2011 4:04:06 PM EDT
[#22]
I don't know why you are complaining man... sounds like you have found yourself free labor...

MIke.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 7:53:08 PM EDT
[#23]
My oldest kids (9 & 10) load 9mm plinking rounds with me all the time. One throws charges and puts them in a block, I inspect for uniformity and weigh them periodically then pass the the tray off to the other one for seating. It works great and we a have fun chatting.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 8:21:05 PM EDT
[#24]
My rock chucker isn't even mine anymore, My daughter says, " The green one is mine, and the blue one is yours!"  -

She loves to help with resizing on "Her" green one.................

The 550b goes into action usually after bedtime -
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 9:21:23 PM EDT
[#25]
I was loading shotgun shells at 8. This was back in the '60s and I don't remember what press dad had.
Now my 9 and 10 year old girls help me sort brass, and my Dillon SDB has a case feed- although it seems to prefer nickel over brass.
They also love to help me tumble and turn the media separator.
Neither is ready yet to load, but someday they will.

Jim
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 2:51:16 PM EDT
[#26]
My kids argue over who gets to fill the trays and put rounds into boxes etc.
Just make sure they wash their hands after helping
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 3:22:28 PM EDT
[#27]
time to go out for a loaf of bread, never look back...
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 3:52:37 PM EDT
[#28]
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 11:54:13 PM EDT
[#29]
I taught my (now 9 yo ) Daughter how to count to 100 with an MTM box full of 230 gr 45, it really shows the whole tens and ones thing well.
She really likes helping with reloading, as did her older sister.
She cant wait until my Barnes 300 gr .458 TTSXs get in from back order so we can load them up for the
.458 SOCOM.
she always wears her glasses, and always washes her hands when finished.
I need to load up some 230 ball 45, and 77 gr Nosler .223
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