Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
User Panel

Site Notices
Posted: 9/1/2008 9:40:25 AM EDT
I live in an appartment . i would like to start reloading . but is it sensible inside an appartment? i may be able to do my tumbling at work .
would like to do .223 .308 and 9mm and .45
the rifle rounds would be what i would want to start with
so what all would i need any recomendations ?
also about how much is a tumbler
thanks alot
Nick
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 9:53:53 AM EDT
[#1]
You don't need a tumbler.

You need four Lee Hand presses.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 10:04:48 AM EDT
[#2]
Reloading in an apt is no big deal, I've set up a respectable bench in a small studio apt when I took over the lease for my brother.

Link Posted: 9/1/2008 10:23:44 AM EDT
[#3]
I used to do it.

I used a Lee Challenger press bolted to a piece of 2x4, used a C-clamp to clamp it to a desk and removed it when I wasn't using it.

I didn't have a tumbler back then.  I just lived with tarnished, ugly brass.

You could try liquid type brass cleaners, maybe.

Link Posted: 9/1/2008 10:47:16 AM EDT
[#4]
Yeah its no biggie, i needed a portable reloading place and all the great ARFCOMers helped me out. Now i have a lee turrent mounted on a 2x8 and it works like a charm. Lymans tumbler isnt that noisy.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 10:51:23 AM EDT
[#5]
I live in an apartment and I reload.

My kitchen table has two holes drilled in it and a pair of those nuts with the flanges and and spikes (like you find in the bottom of furniture legs) in the holes to mount my press. But then this table has been my reloading bench since 1979. Looong before I moved into this crappy little apartment. I have a Lyman 600 tumbler that sits on the shelf in the top a closet. Below that is one of the smaller roll around tool boxes with a top box on it. Top box has my tools, bottom box stores the powder and larger tools. Brass and bullets are kept in .50 cal ammo cans. Doesn't take up too much room and works well for me.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 10:55:07 AM EDT
[#6]

Quoted:

You could try liquid type brass cleaners, maybe.



Rifle brass can be wiped down prior to sizing.

Pistol brass can be cleaned the same way.

You could buy a RCBS rotary tumbler. It makes less noise.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 12:08:34 PM EDT
[#7]
Ok so first thing i need is a press im guessing .
tumbler would be ok once i got started?
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 12:26:03 PM EDT
[#8]
The issue with a tumbler in an apartment is the noise.  And that's something you can work on pretty easily, once you have a bench and get your press set up.

For the bench, you'll need something solid that fits in your space restrictions.  In the last apartment I lived in, we had a "bonus room," a room that was big enough to be a small bedroom but lacked a closet.  That was my loading room, and I had a 30"X60" bench in it.  But it's possible, even very simple, to load using a WorkMate (or even better, a clone) as the basis for your bench.

Once you get that handled, it's time to work on making a tumbler quiet enough that the neighbors won't be disturbed.  You could put it on a cushioned surface to minimize sound transmission to whatever it's on, and then put something sound-deadening around it—without blocking the flow of air, of course.

First things first: what amount of space do you have for loading?
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 12:35:32 PM EDT
[#9]
You don't need no bench. Just get some hand presses.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 12:52:23 PM EDT
[#10]

Quoted:
I live in an appartment . i would like to start reloading . but is it sensible inside an appartment? i may be able to do my tumbling at work .
would like to do .223 .308 and 9mm and .45
the rifle rounds would be what i would want to start with
so what all would i need any recomendations ?
also about how much is a tumbler
thanks alot
Nick


I live in a condo with carpet and reload in the second bedroom.  I tumble during the day and I place my tumbler on a 18"x18" tile that keeps airflow going and keeps it centered.  I use a Dillon CV-500 which has a good sized motor.  Once the tumbler is full, it's actually a bit more quiet, but you can always get a big box and turn it upside down and over the machine.  Line the box if you want and check for heat build up, but holes can help that and it will muffle the sound moreso.  Also, get a tile and put it on foam if you're above somebody and then put the tumbler on that.

Other than those tips, just get a single stage press, trimmer and the usual stuff if rifle carts are the ones you want to start with first.  Check the reloading FAQ section, but you can tumble for an hour or so, get super shiney brass and do it in 90 minutes or less with some fine mesh walnut and some Dillon Rapid polish.  No need to tumble through the night.

Chris

Link Posted: 9/1/2008 1:14:56 PM EDT
[#11]
The Lee Hand press easily handles all the calibers you mentioned, and it requires no bench or mounting.  I started with a Lee Hand Press, and I made some of my most accurate 223 ammo with it.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 2:12:34 PM EDT
[#12]
OK . i have a large closet to store everything in.
I can tumble at work so noise wont be an issue .
Now what do i need to do the rest . powder measuring and stuff like that
ive watched you tube on sizing and depriming . im guessing ill need the little hand reamer for crimped stuff
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 2:42:23 PM EDT
[#13]
To get "clean brass" consider...........chemical cleaning.

As for the LEE Hand Press as a first press..........I'd stay away from it.

IMHO.........go with a standard single station, instead.  Either, bench mounted or mounted on a scrap of wood and C clamped to a more sturdy base.


IF you're looking to go cheap (not a bad "cheap")..........IMHO, "LEE."

For dies.......use any brand (from a major mfn) that you like. They are basically, all of high quality. The differences are in the, "features and small parts."

LEE makes good dies (and they give you a bonus: a shell holder and powder dipper w/load data chart).

When re-loading bottle neck cases (.223/5.56mm) to be used in a semi auto, IMHO, buy the FULL LENGTH re-sizer, two die set. Generally, you don't need a SB die set (unless you run into trouble).  IF, you want the LEE FCD they also have a three die set that includes it, for a little extra.

When re-loading for straight walled pistol cases (9mm, 45 ACP, .38 Special, etc...), IMHO, buy the carbide, three die set. The carbide re-sizer will eliminate the need to lube cases.  And, IF you want the LEE FCD, I believe that LEE has a four die set, for most of the popular calibers.
_______________________________________________

ASSUMING, that you purchase a single stage press.  

Basically (For non-crimped primer pocket, rifle brass, say a batch "lot" of a 100 cases):

1) Inspect and clean the cases- a liquid bath in hot water and dish soap, will get them clean. Though, not shiny. Or, you could just wipe the cases off with a solvent dampened rag.

IF you want, clean with some shine……Birchwood Casey Case Cleaning Solution (#33845 CCI) is a fast and cheap way. Mix with water (follow the directions on the package) soak the brass, drain and dry. Save the solution as it can be re-used.

2) Set up your press with the shell holder and de-capper/FL re-sizer die.

3) Lube the cases. LEE lube (#90006) can be applied with fingers. Or, buy a spray on lube from one of the "other brands."

4) Then, run some test cases through the die, it'll de-cap/re-size the brass in one pass.

5) Next, using a case gauge, check the brass to ensure that the proper re-size, has been achieved. IF the brass passes, it's on to the next step. IF not, adjust your die setting. Don't forget about the lock ring on your die. BTW, the other end of the gauge, also checks IF you need to trim the brass.

6) Run the rest of the case through the de-cap/re-size die.

7) Trimming brass. Remember the case gauge? Well, if your brass failed the gauge test, you will need to trim the brass. Or check the brass length with a caliper.

The cheapest way to trim brass, is with the LEE case trimmer. You'll need the cutter & lock stub and shell holder & case length gauge tools. The assembled trimmer runs on hand power or with a drill. Once the trimming is done, use a chamfer/reamer tool (LEE #90109) to "knock off the edge" on the newly cut case necks.

8) Clean the brass to take off the lube.......repeat, Step #1.

9) Then, re-prime the cases with a new primer.

The LEE auto prime hand tool makes fast work of this job. BTW, you'll need a special shell holder (not your reg. press shell holder) made especially for the LEE auto prime.

OR........use your press mounted primer tool.

10) After the cases have been re-primed, place the cases in a loading block.

11) Using a simple powder measure, calibrate it to throw the weight of powder charge that you want.

12) Check the thrown weight with your scale.

13) When you're satisfied that the weight is "correct." Charge each of the cases with powder.

14) Next, remove the de-capper/re-sizer die from the press and replace it with the bullet seating die. Then, place the bullet on top of the opening of the case neck. Run the case w/bullet into the bullet seating die.

15) Inspect your rounds. You're done.

______________________________________________

To adjust dies correctly.......see the link…….

www.chuckhawks.com/adjust_reloading_dies.htm

_______________________________________________

There are many LEE single station presses to choose from.

www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1217810820.1709=/html/catalog/classic.html

www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1217810820.1709=/html/catalog/rlpress1.html

If you're in the market for a "kit."   I like this one.

www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1217810820.1709=/html/catalog/rlpress2.html#breech

________________________________________________

IMHO, a good compromise between a single station and a progressive is a Turret Press........

www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1217810820.1709=/html/catalog/turretpress.html

________________________________________________

NOTE: There are many ways to skin a cat.  I tried to write this, keeping in mind a CHEAP WAY to do things.  Thus, the choice of LEE products.  
________________________________________________

That being said, a good press will last a lifetime and then some.   Be it a LEE or RCBS or whatever other brand.

I bought a lot of my starter equipment, USED.  And, I still have a lot of it.

My first press was a used RCBS Jr. and I later traded it for a used RCBS Rock Chucker.  My friend wanted a smaller press and it was a straight across trade.  So, how could I refuse?

Anyway, after a long time of using a single station press…………I up-graded.

I bought a Dillon.  Then later, three LEE M1000 presses (just for pistol calibers).

Even after you get a progressive press........well, just say that for ME, there will always be a job for the single station press on my bench.  
_________________________________________________


Aloha, Mark
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 2:57:42 PM EDT
[#14]
I guess I am more paranoid than everyone else. I rented a house for 10 years and had no problem having a complete setup because no one not even the land lord entered the house, I had the only key.

When I moved to Corpus I moved into an apartment building, in that apartment I would never even consider setting up my stuff. There were too many people in and out that I didn't know while I wasn't home, exterminator, maintenance , and who knows who else. I didn't have a gun safe so I didn't want to give any clue that I had guns.

For 3 years the reloading  equipment stayed boxed up, I have since bought a house so it is no concern now.

I would suggest you get a setup that can be hidden after each use, something inexpensive because it is very likely you want to upgrade later and no longer use the temporary press .

Like I mentioned, I may be paranoid, but it is something to consider. Too many people get their guns stolen because someone knows they're  there, and break in specifically to steal the guns.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 3:18:26 PM EDT
[#15]
Im paranoid as well
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 6:59:48 PM EDT
[#16]
I use this and it only takes up a 30"x30" footprint, it's a small computer desk/hutch that I picked up from Staples and it's pretty solid and has storage underneath

Link Posted: 9/1/2008 7:02:56 PM EDT
[#17]

Quoted:

As for the LEE Hand Press as a first press..........I'd stay away from it.



Why?
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 7:05:08 PM EDT
[#18]

Quoted:
I guess I am more paranoid than everyone else. I rented a house for 10 years and had no problem having a complete setup because no one not even the land lord entered the house, I had the only key.

When I moved to Corpus I moved into an apartment building, in that apartment I would never even consider setting up my stuff. There were too many people in and out that I didn't know while I wasn't home, exterminator, maintenance , and who knows who else. I didn't have a gun safe so I didn't want to give any clue that I had guns.

For 3 years the reloading  equipment stayed boxed up, I have since bought a house so it is no concern now.

I would suggest you get a setup that can be hidden after each use, something inexpensive because it is very likely you want to upgrade later and no longer use the temporary press .

Like I mentioned, I may be paranoid, but it is something to consider. Too many people get their guns stolen because someone knows they're  there, and break in specifically to steal the guns.


Hence the hand press.

For those who want better than Lee, Meecham makes the best hand press on the market.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 8:52:36 PM EDT
[#19]
Nothing wrong with learning to reload with a hand press.  I did, and from day one my reloads were more accurate and consistent than almost all the factory ammo I had been using.  

Now I use a Redding Big Boss II because I have more space, but it doesn't make more accurate ammo, and it really doesn't save that much time.

One could actually argue advantages of using a hand press to start, such as a much better "feel" for bullet seating and other operations.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 9:04:06 PM EDT
[#20]
I reloaded for several years in an apt. I did all my tumbling outside the front door. I set up my dinner table and a reloading bench.

Good Luck!
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 9:35:05 PM EDT
[#21]

Quoted:

Quoted:

As for the LEE Hand Press as a first press..........I'd stay away from it.



Why?


I started with a used single station press.  After years of experience, with the single station I graduated to a Dillon progressive press.   Somewhere along the way, I bought a LEE hand press.  I thought, I could get some simple re-loading in, during breaks at work.

So, having owned and used one (hand press) with .308 Win........well, it wasn't RIGHT for ME and I sold it off.  

So, based on my experience with it..........I don't suggest it as a FIRST PRESS.  That's just, MY OPINION.

It's just so much faster and easier to use a regular single station.  And, the cost of a single station, isn't that much over the hand press.

Then.........IF you remember back a few months............there was a guy with "problems" with his hand press.  It came down to the FACT that he wasn't re-sizing his brass "all the way."  Yes, it takes some MUSCLE POWER to get those handles together all the way, to re-size brass.  

IF a regular single station was used.........I suspect, that he would have benefited by the leverage, during the re-sizing of his cases.

And........YES, there are "others" out there with problems w/ re-sizing and die adjustment.  They own Dillon, RCBS, LEE and/or whatever brands.  Problems, aren't limited by brand or type of press.

Though, some BLUE KOOL AID drinkers may have you thinking otherwise.

May I suggest:  Get a good manual (or several) and a mentor.  

And.......It's only MY advice:  "As for the LEE Hand Press as a first press..........I'd stay away from it."

What you do, is up to you.  As always: YMWV.

Aloha, Mark

PS............


May I suggest..............LEE Anniversary Kit

www.realguns.com/Commentary/comar142.htm  

Then, as for trimming brass on the cheap

www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1205456436.339=/html/catalog/casecon.html  

IF, you still think that it's too much money................I suggest a LEE "C" press. (#90700) It goes for about $35 and comes with a FREE LEE re-loading manual (you'll need it anyway).

www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1215231733.1744=/html/catalog/rlpress2.html#LeeAnniversaryPack  

Then, the LEE hand press (#90179) is also an alternative............

www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog/browse.cgi?1215231733.1744=/html/catalog/rlpress2.html  

It's about half way down the page. BTW, personally.........I don't recommend it as a starter.

IF $ was that tight, I'd rather start with the "C" press or a USED press (I did). Then, add: dies, scale, etc......

IMHO........here is one of the best threads for users of a LEE hand press (also, clink the links) it's full of good information for using that press. And, on the links you'll see "kitchen table" set ups from other AR15 members.

ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=6&f=42&t=246782

HTH.

Aloha, Mark
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 9:38:58 PM EDT
[#22]
Just realized that the link......is DEAD.......SORRY.

ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=6&f=42&t=246782

___________________________________________________

IF you want to use a LEE Hand Press...........


Assuming that you purchased a LEE hand press kit.  

Basically (For non-primer crimped, rifle brass):

1) Inspect and clean the cases- a liquid bath in hot water and dish soap, will get them clean.  Though, not shiny.

IF you want, clean with some shine……Birchwood Casey Case Cleaning Solution is a fast and cheap way. Mix with water (follow the directions on the package) soak the brass, drain and dry. Save the solution as it can be re-used.

2) Set up your hand press with the shell holder and de-capper/FL re-sizer die.

3) Lube the cases. LEE lube can be applied with fingers.

4) Then, de-cap/re-size the brass.

5) Gauge the case(s) to ensure that the proper re-size, has been achieved. IF the brass passes, it's on to the next step. IF not, adjust your die setting. BTW, the other end of the gauge, also checks IF you need to trim the brass.

6) Trim the brass IF needed. The cheapest way, is with the LEE case trimmer. You'll need the cutter & lock stub and shell holder & case length gauge. Once the trimming is done, use a chamfer/reamer tool to "knock off the edge" on the newly cut case necks.

7) Clean off the lube. A solvent dampened rag or another soak in the case cleaner. Make sure the cases are dry before proceeding to the next step.

8) Re-prime the cases. Use the tools that you got with the LEE hand press kit.

Or get the LEE auto prime hand tool. You'll also need a special shell holder made especially for the LEE auto prime.

9) Using the LEE powder dipper you can measure out the recommended powder charge (use the data sheet info you got w/the dies) and drop the powder into the primed case.

10) Remove the de-capper/re-sizer die and replace it with the bullet seating die. Then place the bullet on top of the opening of the case neck. Run the case w/bullet into the bullet seating die. You're done.
______________________________________________

NOTE: There are many ways to skin a cat. I tried to write this, keeping in mind a CHEAP WAY to do things. Thus, the choice of LEE products.
______________________________________________



YMWV........and it's only my .02.

Aloha, Mark

Link Posted: 9/1/2008 9:52:13 PM EDT
[#23]
I have never had any issues sizing 308 in the hand press. I use imperial. I can do a couple of push-ups too.
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 10:04:25 PM EDT
[#24]
YES.......I figured that it was a matter of PERSONAL experience.

Some-a-do.........and.........some-a-don't.

Aloha, Mark
Link Posted: 9/1/2008 10:20:45 PM EDT
[#25]

Quoted:
I used to do it.

I used a Lee Challenger press bolted to a piece of 2x4, used a C-clamp to clamp it to a desk and removed it when I wasn't using it.

I didn't have a tumbler back then.  I just lived with tarnished, ugly brass.

You could try liquid type brass cleaners, maybe.



This, except it was a 2x6.  About 2 foot long gives you enough room to mount the powder dispenser as well.
Link Posted: 9/2/2008 5:12:36 AM EDT
[#26]
When I was a hive dweller:

I mounted my press on a 2 X 6 and used to clamp it to the kitchen table using two of these



There was a storage room where I kept powder etc. in ammo cans.

I used birchwood casey brass cleaner, no tumbler at the time.
Link Posted: 9/2/2008 5:38:57 AM EDT
[#27]
Bench Grinder Stand



Mount the press to a nice piece of wood and C-clamp it to the top of the stand... also helps if you add a nice wood base to the bottom of the stand.  when you are done you can put the press away and throw a table cloth on top of the stand.

Link Posted: 9/2/2008 10:21:21 AM EDT
[#28]

Quoted:
Bench Grinder Stand

www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos/42900-42999/42986.gif

Mount the press to a nice piece of wood and C-clamp it to the top of the stand... also helps if you add a nice wood base to the bottom of the stand.  when you are done you can put the press away and throw a table cloth on top of the stand.



ONLY PROBLEM.........the landlord may not like the holes in the floor (be it garage or in the home/apt.).  The re-sizing process puts a lot of stress...........be careful of tip over accidents.  
_________________________________________

IF you don't want a dedicated bench.

Note:  Some folks have used a Black and Decker WorkMate as their portable bench.  Some have bought the Frankford Arsenal Portable Stand/Bench (from Midway USA).   And, as mentioned before, the press can be mounted on scrap wood and C clamped to the kitchen table.

Aloha, Mark
Link Posted: 9/2/2008 4:27:42 PM EDT
[#29]
Me my reloading bench is actually an old computer desk, i just used one of the side pieces from the extra top shelf thing and added it to the area where i mount my press.

as for a tumbler...... get one, just use it during the day and at times when there is a normal ammount of noise in the building. since I want mine a bit quieter I put a few old towels which are rags under it and am around while it runs in case it gets a tad hot which has not happened yet.
Link Posted: 9/2/2008 4:38:20 PM EDT
[#30]
My wife and I have an apartment while we are in college.  I have a lot of reloading stuff (brass etc.) i fit under the bed and wherever i can find room.  One day I would like a room just for reloading.    I bought this desk at DI for like 25 bucks and it is great in my apartment.  Here is just a shot of the bench and my Dillon and Lee.....I reload 308, 9mm, .223.  It can be done....



Good Luck,
JP
Link Posted: 9/2/2008 7:54:14 PM EDT
[#31]
I use a vibrating cleaner in my apartment with no problems.  I try to be considerate.  I only run it during the day.

I have a 18" X 24" piece of 3/4" plywood drilled to mount my Hornady L-N-L progressive press.  The plywood is then bolted to a  Black & Decker Workmate.  Wing nuts make quick work of putting it together and breaking back down.

When not in use, the press and other assorted stuff go in a plastic tote and the workmate folds up for storage in the back of the closet.

Link Posted: 9/3/2008 8:20:27 PM EDT
[#32]
i am in an apartment too. the most difficult part is to find the place to mount the 550B. I finally mounted on a folding sheet metal chair that you can find in cheap lunch room. some day i'll take a picture.

the rest is no issue.
Link Posted: 9/3/2008 9:43:51 PM EDT
[#33]

Quoted:
I use a vibrating cleaner in my apartment with no problems.  I try to be considerate.  I only run it during the day.



The morons that live next to be bought rock band a couple months ago.  Now, they face the rath of my vibratory cleaner at 7 AM.
Close Join Our Mail List to Stay Up To Date! Win a FREE Membership!

Sign up for the ARFCOM weekly newsletter and be entered to win a free ARFCOM membership. One new winner* is announced every week!

You will receive an email every Friday morning featuring the latest chatter from the hottest topics, breaking news surrounding legislation, as well as exclusive deals only available to ARFCOM email subscribers.


By signing up you agree to our User Agreement. *Must have a registered ARFCOM account to win.
Top Top