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Posted: 8/4/2011 3:54:09 AM EDT
after application. I put 3 light coats of Krylon flat olive camo paint & a day later some

Krylon clear acrylic. The paint feels slightly tacky after you hold on to it for a moment.

Will this go away in time, or did I goof-up the paint job?? Thinking about putting some

wax over it –– Or is this a bad idea?? Thx.
Link Posted: 8/4/2011 3:59:19 AM EDT
[#1]
Paint doesn't 'dry', it 'cures'.




Your paint may dry, but it hasn't cured, and probably wont at this point.
Wax would probably make the problem worse, I can't see it helping.
ETA: Was it tacky before the clear?


If so, that's a problem all the way through.


If not, either the acrylic is incompatible, or defective.





 
Link Posted: 8/4/2011 4:34:08 AM EDT
[#2]
How did you prep the weapon before painting it?   if there was any type of residue, this could prevent paint from curing properly.  I doubt it will ever be right if it isn't in 2 weeks time.
Link Posted: 8/4/2011 4:46:52 AM EDT
[#3]




Quoted:

How did you prep the weapon before painting it? if there was any type of residue, this could prevent paint from curing properly. I doubt it will ever be right if it isn't in 2 weeks time.


I sanded the stock & HG's to bare wood & used a tack cloth to remove any dust. The wood looked nice and clean –– No oil, etc. The parts are solid wood, not laminated. The paint before the clear coat felt dry to the touch. Its weird: If you touch the finish briefly, it 'feels' like it has cured properly. Only after holding it for a moment, like over 30 seconds, does it feel a bit 'tacky'. Maybe something about body heat or skin moisture doing it.

Link Posted: 8/4/2011 5:15:59 AM EDT
[#4]
Just out of curiosity:

Is it just sticky, or can you actually leave fingerprints in it?



Either way, it'll probably be easier to just strip it at this point, but I'm not an expert on many things, and AK wood is one of them.
Link Posted: 8/4/2011 7:23:01 AM EDT
[#5]
I see you are in Ohio I bet the humidity has something to do with it. The can will say best used between this humidity level, usually less than 70% if memory serves correctly.
Link Posted: 8/4/2011 8:15:05 AM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:

Quoted:
How did you prep the weapon before painting it? if there was any type of residue, this could prevent paint from curing properly. I doubt it will ever be right if it isn't in 2 weeks time.

I sanded the stock & HG's to bare wood & used a tack cloth to remove any dust. The wood looked nice and clean –– No oil, etc. The parts are solid wood, not laminated. The paint before the clear coat felt dry to the touch. Its weird: If you touch the finish briefly, it 'feels' like it has cured properly. Only after holding it for a moment, like over 30 seconds, does it feel a bit 'tacky'. Maybe something about body heat or skin moisture doing it.


I've seen that type of thing happen in the aforementioned case and also in very humid conditions.
Link Posted: 8/4/2011 9:01:51 AM EDT
[#7]
I recently painted my Steyr Scout and cleared it with krylon matte. It was nice and dry for about a month but when the humidity went up here in GA the stock became tacky as well. I just repainted it and skipped the clear.
Link Posted: 8/4/2011 9:03:54 AM EDT
[#8]
You have moisture or oil or both trapped in the wood under the finish.
Link Posted: 8/4/2011 9:18:56 AM EDT
[#9]
"Just out of curiosity:

Is it just sticky, or can you actually leave fingerprints in it?"



Just a slight tacky 'feel' –– No finger prints that I can see. No paint comes-off on to the skin.


"I see you are in Ohio I bet the humidity has something to do with it. The can will say best used between this humidity level, usually less than 70% if memory serves correctly."



Weather was hot & humid the weekend I painted –– Probably low 90's temperature & humidity about the same. I was wondering about

the effect of the high humidity myself.



I think I will just give it some time to finish-off. If it stays that way I'll probably sand it down and repaint. Too bad, it really looks good!

Link Posted: 8/6/2011 12:36:21 AM EDT
[#10]
I vote oil in the wood.

You need to strip it, sand it again, and sweat the wood in warm temps for a while followed by some degrease action to get the paint to adhere. Application of a sealer might be the best bet to stop any deep contaminates from leaching to the surface.
Link Posted: 8/6/2011 5:47:44 PM EDT
[#11]
I painted up some ladder rails for a friend (think they are TangoDown's) but after 5 months sitting they still feel tacky. I can put a finger nail mark in them still. I did up some Magpul's for him and they were dry and GTG in 2 days.

But for the wood I would also say it has a ton of oil in it and it will not let the pain cure 100%.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 7:30:09 AM EDT
[#12]
Quoted:
I see you are in Ohio I bet the humidity has something to do with it. The can will say best used between this humidity level, usually less than 70% if memory serves correctly.


Probably.  I do some of the light bodywork on my cars and the biggest problem with living in Ohio is that (without a climate controlled garage, which I don't have), there's all of about 3 days a year that meet the temperature AND humidity requirements of the various primers and paints!  :-(

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