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Posted: 5/30/2008 3:05:31 PM EST
Guys,

I have a stepdaughter that shoots trap for her high school. She just completed her freshman year and has decided she loves it. She wants to continue next year. She has been using a model Remington 8/70 Wingmaster Classic Trap with Remchokes (i.e. it has removable choke tubes not a "fixed" choke barrel). The gun is 3 years old and is in pretty good shape. This is the high school's gun and she has the option to buy it if she wants it for competition and practice next year. She thinks this is the only gun for her because it feels good and she does well with it. The fact of the matter is that she is used to it and wants to continue using it because she is extremely comfortable with it. However, the coach wants what he paid for it two years ago, as that is their policy. He bought it used for $500.00 and wants $500.00 smackers for it today. Is this acceptable or is this too expensive of a shotgun to buy for trap?

The stock has been shortened by about 3/4th of an inch as girls typically have shorter arms and a softer trap style recoil pad "Trapdude Pad" was added. The current price for the 8/70 Trap is about $749.00 and you can see one on Gunbroker at: www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=100976575. The problem is that I don't know how much it would be to find a used one with the same features that has the shortened stock. She cannot use a full length stock and this really throws a monkey wrench into the whole thing because there are hardly any current USED guns that have the shortened stock. This really limits my ability to "make a deal" on the gun we need.

So, should I buy this one and say fuggit or should I try and find a used basic gun, add the components to it, shorten the stock, and try and save some money? If this is the case, can money be saved by the time you get done screwing around with all those mods? I don't know much about shotguns as I really like my rifle and pistol shooting, so I appreciate any help (information) I can get from any of you.

Thanks,

Joel
Link Posted: 5/30/2008 3:38:25 PM EST
In sports like trap shooting, confidence is really important. You want her focussing on her game, and not worrying about the gun, or - worse - blaming it (and by extension you) when she misses a bird. How much cheaper might you get another shotgun ? Sure, you might save a few hundred $, but is it worth the hassle ? I say buy her the gun she is confident in.
Link Posted: 5/30/2008 4:24:44 PM EST
IMO, the price is a little high. However, if she shoots well with it, she doesn't need to have to relearn everything with a new gun.

You might look around, I think someone here was selling an 870 Trap for $400 something.
Link Posted: 5/30/2008 4:24:48 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/30/2008 4:38:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/30/2008 4:42:29 PM EST by Dano523]
Link Posted: 5/30/2008 5:17:02 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/30/2008 7:08:45 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 9:20:03 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 9:49:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By Dano523:
Now a little warning, if she is going to shoot on the college teams down the road, she is going to need a O/U. The college teams shoot single-double-wobble trap and American-international skeet. Since she is already used to a high shooting gun (what the 870 is now doing), then a doubles trap O/U will fit the bill nicely.




Autoloaders are perfectly good as well, and typically MUCH cheaper than good O/Us if money is an issue. Some of the best colligiate shooters are using Beretta autos. (One of the things I can't stand when I shoot at an open public range are the old-timers that ridicule anyone using autoloaders or pumps of any variety; basically anything other than a several-thousand-dollar break-action)


Also, using a trap gun for other events can be tricky; unless she is sure she wants to pursue trap exclusively, a "sporting" model with a flatter rib is usually a better all-around choice. YMMV.

Of course, if funds are not an issue, then the real thing is to get an O/U with a single trap barrel, a double trap barrel, and a sporting barrel (with a tube set for the sporting config).
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 10:36:03 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 2:51:52 PM EST
Spend the money. Not only will your daughter get HER gun, but you will enable the coach to get another gun that gets another kid into the game.
Link Posted: 5/31/2008 7:41:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By mike103:

Originally Posted By Walkure:

Originally Posted By Dano523:
Now a little warning, if she is going to shoot on the college teams down the road, she is going to need a O/U. The college teams shoot single-double-wobble trap and American-international skeet. Since she is already used to a high shooting gun (what the 870 is now doing), then a doubles trap O/U will fit the bill nicely.


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Autoloaders are perfectly good as well, and typically MUCH cheaper than good O/Us if money is an issue. Some of the best collegiate shooters are using Beretta autos. (One of the things I can't stand when I shoot at an open public range are the old-timers that ridicule anyone using autoloaders or pumps of any variety; basically anything other than a several-thousand-dollar break-action)


Also, using a trap gun for other events can be tricky; unless she is sure she wants to pursue trap exclusively, a "sporting" model with a flatter rib is usually a better all-around choice. YMMV.

Of course, if funds are not an issue, then the real thing is to get an O/U with a single trap barrel, a double trap barrel, and a sporting barrel (with a tube set for the sporting configure).


If you read the original post she is shooting trap.

Go to the grand and see how many auto's you see.

I own 12 auto shotguns.

I own 12 pump shotguns.

If you are going to shoot the clay games seriously you are better off with a good O/U.

Might not be what you wanted to hear, I know I didn't, but it is true.

MIKE.



Look at what I specifically QUOTED in my post. I was referring to the statement that if she is going to get into more shooting in college - including events such as dobules trap, wobble trap, or even skeet - then a O/U is necessary. I was directly replying first to dano; only the latter part of my post is in direct reply to the OP. (And I can assure you, there are plenty high-ranking shooters in collegiate matches running autos.)

Also, in my experience, the type of shotgun has little to nothing to do with anything. It's all about the gun fitting the shooter, and the shooter being familiar with the gun. I can routinely out-shoot people with O/Us using my Benellis. I used to use a O/U, but performed worse than I do with my autos now, as that particular shotgun did not suit me well (as it turned out).

The inherent advantages to a O/U over an auto for clays are:
1) The ability to have different chokes for each shot - of little to no use in American and International events. Of some use in 5-stand and other clay events.

2) The ability to accept tubes - only of use for registered skeet matches with mutliple gauges shot, and similar events

3) Longer barrels with shorter OAL - balance issue more than anything; comes down to the gun fitting a user more than anything

4) Generally improved reliability - no worry of jams or short-strokes, though the possibility of other mechanical malfunctions remains



To the OP:

With all of this being said, I again stand by my position.

If she wants to stay with trap, and she feels comfortable with the 870 (and she seems to be doing well - i.e., it seems to fit her well), then buy it.

If she wants to stay with trap, but isn't sure about the 870, shop around some first. As another suggested, look at some of the single-shot trap guns for reasonable alternatives.

If she wants to get involved with other events, but really likes the 870 (and is willing to practice skeet and other events sufficiently to adjust to the higher rib), just get it.

If she wants to get involved with other events, but isn't dead-set on the 870, shop around. Autoloaders are a good way to go if strapped for cash. However, don't skimp; buy something good enough to be reliable, consistent, and last. It's very easy to start shooting a LOT in the clay sports. I was shooting my shotguns many times more than everything through my rifles and pistols combined during my time at UIUC (when I participated in/on the Trap & Skeet Club/Team)

As I said, the ultimate would be to buy an O/U with a full set of barrels and a full set of tubes, though this would likely be cost prohibitive for your situation.
Link Posted: 6/2/2008 4:21:42 PM EST
I would buy it, then make her get a job for the summer and pay for half.

Girls are good at selling ice cream
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 9:41:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By bmyk:
Spend the money. Not only will your daughter get HER gun, but you will enable the coach to get another gun that gets another kid into the game.


Like he said, the money is going back into the school to replace the gun you bought. Can't go wrong there. Plus I don't think there is a price on a well fitting firearm.

All that being said, I would take your daughter to a gun store with a good selection and let her feel a few other shotguns before purchasing. Let her decide what she likes best. Your a lucky father.
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