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Posted: 10/20/2013 7:08:28 AM EDT
.224 SMK 69 gn BTHP, 5.56 brass trim length 1.751, #41 primers, 25.0 gn Varget gas, COAL of 2.241.
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 7:27:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/20/2013 7:30:43 AM EDT by SteelonSteel]
how's it sound?  It sounds like you just grabbed a load off the internet.  

For safety read a reloading manual and work up to that load.  Don't go all in with no work up or you could end up like this or this .

It approximates what a lot of service rifle shooters use.   It's too much for some guns.
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 7:37:26 AM EDT
Hogden publishes load data for that exact bullet online here.

Data
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 7:42:32 AM EDT
25.0- 25.5 grains of Varget under a 69 SMK is where most people start to see pressure signs.  

You need to work up to that load.   Thats not just mindless safety warning bullshit.   25.0 grains IS overpressure in lots of rifles.
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 7:45:16 AM EDT
It doesn't sound very wise

SteelonSteel gave some sound advice. You should learn about reloading before you jump into it.

If you already have, and we are misunderstanding you, than you need to be more specific about your intentions in your post.
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 9:51:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/20/2013 9:53:57 AM EDT by jim]
How's this sound, read, read, read, load data. Start low end, work loads from there. Safety 1st, high end last.
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 10:33:45 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
how's it sound?  It sounds like you just grabbed a load off the internet.  

For safety read a reloading manual and work up to that load.  Don't go all in with no work up or you could end up like this or this .

It approximates what a lot of service rifle shooters use.   It's too much for some guns.
View Quote


Hmmm, why didn't I think of that? Oh, I did. I've work the load starting at minimum, and worked to the half way. And yes, I looked at Lee, Hornady and Lyman manuals, even the loading site mentioned below.
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 10:36:52 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By gman556:
It doesn't sound very wise

SteelonSteel gave some sound advice. You should learn about reloading before you jump into it.

If you already have, and we are misunderstanding you, than you need to be more specific about your intentions in your post.
View Quote


Intention, I was wondering if anyone else loaded this, as I have not seen a lot of discussion with these particulars.
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 1:17:46 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Quarterback55:


Intention, I was wondering if anyone else loaded this, as I have not seen a lot of discussion with these particulars.
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Originally Posted By Quarterback55:
Originally Posted By gman556:
It doesn't sound very wise

SteelonSteel gave some sound advice. You should learn about reloading before you jump into it.

If you already have, and we are misunderstanding you, than you need to be more specific about your intentions in your post.


Intention, I was wondering if anyone else loaded this, as I have not seen a lot of discussion with these particulars.


https://www.google.com/search?q=69+gn+BTHP&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:IE-ContextMenu&ie=&oe=#q=smk+69+gn+BTHP&rls=com.microsoft:en-US%3AIE-ContextMenu&safe=off
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 1:50:13 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Quarterback55:
Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
how's it sound?  It sounds like you just grabbed a load off the internet.  

For safety read a reloading manual and work up to that load.  Don't go all in with no work up or you could end up like this or this .

It approximates what a lot of service rifle shooters use.   It's too much for some guns.
View Quote


Hmmm, why didn't I think of that? Oh, I did. I've work the load starting at minimum, and worked to the half way. And yes, I looked at Lee, Hornady and Lyman manuals, even the loading site mentioned below.
View Quote


its probably not wise to come here asking for advice, then give a smartass remark when someone gives you good advice.

in addition to that the OAL will vary from rifle to rifle so theres no way to know what its gonna shoot or how far out the lands are in the rifle. we also dont know your barrel length or twist rate.

buy a book with load data in it, perhaps sierra since your shooting their bullets. follow the recommended specs and work to that load if you say your halfway there then why are you posting here asking about it. work more loads up and progress your way there inspecting cases and watching your groups. simple as that.
every rifle is different thats why its important to work up.

it dosent matter what we load because we arent shooting your rifle.
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 3:52:49 PM EDT
I use 24.5 grains. 25.0 is maximum in several manuals. The problem with Varget is it's bulk. 24.5 grains is where compressed loading begins when using 69 SMK's, 25.0 will get you plenty of crunching when you seat the bullet.
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 6:04:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/20/2013 7:08:13 PM EDT by dryflash3]
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 7:03:57 PM EDT
Why is that too long?  

Ive loaded right up to 2.260-2.265 and never had a feed problem?
Link Posted: 10/20/2013 7:09:04 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 2:36:16 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By borderpatrol:
I use 24.5 grains. 25.0 is maximum in several manuals. The problem with Varget is it's bulk. 24.5 grains is where compressed loading begins when using 69 SMK's, 25.0 will get you plenty of crunching when you seat the bullet.
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Thank you
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 2:38:17 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By TurkeyLeg:
Why is that too long?  

Ive loaded right up to 2.260-2.265 and never had a feed problem?
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I had them at 2.260, and had to adjust depth, tips were touching mag.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 5:40:29 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Quarterback55:


Hmmm, why didn't I think of that? Oh, I did. I've work the load starting at minimum, and worked to the half way. And yes, I looked at Lee, Hornady and Lyman manuals, even the loading site mentioned below.
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Originally Posted By Quarterback55:
Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
how's it sound?  It sounds like you just grabbed a load off the internet.  

For safety read a reloading manual and work up to that load.  Don't go all in with no work up or you could end up like this or this .

It approximates what a lot of service rifle shooters use.   It's too much for some guns.


Hmmm, why didn't I think of that? Oh, I did. I've work the load starting at minimum, and worked to the half way. And yes, I looked at Lee, Hornady and Lyman manuals, even the loading site mentioned below.



Well you got the answer that a completely vague and open ended question gets here, you obviously should have been more explicit.   We get lots of new reloaders coming in here and sounding EXACTLY like your original post.   Ruffling feathers isn't really the intention but informing a new reloader to the reality of the risk is.   Nothing in my post is wrong or unclear.

I'll toss this out to you,  go over to the reloading section of the us rifle teams website.   Be advised some of the loads those guys post are over max and some are using non standard rifles with heavy carriers, etc.   Like others have said, your rifle will tell you your max.   Keep a spare firing pin handy.

Carry on.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 6:27:47 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Quarterback55:


Hmmm, why didn't I think of that? Oh, I did. I've work the load starting at minimum, and worked to the half way. And yes, I looked at Lee, Hornady and Lyman manuals, even the loading site mentioned below.
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Originally Posted By Quarterback55:
Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
how's it sound?  It sounds like you just grabbed a load off the internet.  

For safety read a reloading manual and work up to that load.  Don't go all in with no work up or you could end up like this or this .

It approximates what a lot of service rifle shooters use.   It's too much for some guns.


Hmmm, why didn't I think of that? Oh, I did. I've work the load starting at minimum, and worked to the half way. And yes, I looked at Lee, Hornady and Lyman manuals, even the loading site mentioned below.


Well then why are you asking how it sounds if you have worked up the load? How did it shoot? I would think the proof would be on the paper.
Link Posted: 10/23/2013 3:35:13 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:



Well you got the answer that a completely vague and open ended question gets here, you obviously should have been more explicit.   We get lots of new reloaders coming in here and sounding EXACTLY like your original post.   Ruffling feathers isn't really the intention but informing a new reloader to the reality of the risk is.   Nothing in my post is wrong or unclear.

I'll toss this out to you,  go over to the reloading section of the us rifle teams website.   Be advised some of the loads those guys post are over max and some are using non standard rifles with heavy carriers, etc.   Like others have said, your rifle will tell you your max.   Keep a spare firing pin handy.

Carry on.
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Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
Originally Posted By Quarterback55:
Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
how's it sound?  It sounds like you just grabbed a load off the internet.  

For safety read a reloading manual and work up to that load.  Don't go all in with no work up or you could end up like this or this .

It approximates what a lot of service rifle shooters use.   It's too much for some guns.


Hmmm, why didn't I think of that? Oh, I did. I've work the load starting at minimum, and worked to the half way. And yes, I looked at Lee, Hornady and Lyman manuals, even the loading site mentioned below.



Well you got the answer that a completely vague and open ended question gets here, you obviously should have been more explicit.   We get lots of new reloaders coming in here and sounding EXACTLY like your original post.   Ruffling feathers isn't really the intention but informing a new reloader to the reality of the risk is.   Nothing in my post is wrong or unclear.

I'll toss this out to you,  go over to the reloading section of the us rifle teams website.   Be advised some of the loads those guys post are over max and some are using non standard rifles with heavy carriers, etc.   Like others have said, your rifle will tell you your max.   Keep a spare firing pin handy.

Carry on.


Thanks, I never go over mid range in my rounds with gas. I apologize for the snap, but folks here always think when a question is asked, that the OP is new to reloading. I'm not a spirt by no means, I build AR's , and give a free box of ammo with my sales. Some ask for the heaviest/best rounds, I usually will tell them the difference between firearms, the shooter, the ammo and the use. I've had a lot of customers ask about these, and in mostly 1-9 twist, anything after 69/70 grain, my grouping spreads. So, I'm just researching through experienced reloaders, enough manuals to choke a horse, my testing and so on. That being said, the 3 25.0 gn shot fine, good gruop and all and I shot the 25.3 gn and it showed a little stress on the brass. For a customer, I will stay at 24.5 gn and advise them this is my recommendation, IMO. Again, thanks.
Link Posted: 10/23/2013 6:08:59 AM EDT
Start low and work up.

I've loaded 68 gr Hornady's with 26.0 grains of Varget (highly compressed) with no signs of overpressure.  Put that load in your rifle and you might see ejector marks and flattened primers.  Every rifle is different
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 9:42:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/25/2013 9:48:49 PM EDT by SteelonSteel]
No sweat, I have my rough edges too.

I'm the same way in most applications,  I want good accuracy but I don't like to crowd the max.   Sometimes that's exactly where the best accuracy is.   I don't like to be up there just in case i get a sticky scale or some other minor detail that nudges up pressure.  Even taking a load worked up in one of my ARs and shooting it in another has caused me some flat primers and even a pierced one.

For years I loaded my .22-250 at the first accuracy node I hit.  It wasn't until I got a chronograph that I realized how far downloaded I really was.  The accuracy was pretty damned good though.
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 10:08:11 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
No sweat, I have my rough edges too.

I'm the same way in most applications,  I want good accuracy but I don't like to crowd the max.   Sometimes that's exactly where the best accuracy is.   I don't like to be up there just in case i get a sticky scale or some other minor detail that nudges up pressure.  Even taking a load worked up in one of my ARs and shooting it in another has caused me some flat primers and even a pierced one.

For years I loaded my .22-250 at the first accuracy node I hit.  It wasn't until I got a chronograph that I realized how far downloaded I really was.  The accuracy was pretty damned good though.
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Seems to, accuacy was a little better @ 25.0, I didn't noticed the difference when I came up from 24.6 and .7 but .8,.9 and then 25.0 my results changed. Thanks again.
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