Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/11/2005 9:32:04 PM EDT
Hi

People mentioned that one of the negatives about owning a pump shotgun is the danger of short stroking. Is it common for people to short stroke a pump? Are there shotguns that are more prone to short stroking than others?

I am curious if short stroking occurrs, how does one remedy the situation? (Buy a semi-auto shot gun :) )

Much thanks

Link Posted: 9/11/2005 9:41:17 PM EDT
I served in the Marine Corps and while on deployment on ships we would do weapons shoots with the Remington 870 to familiarize us with shotguns. To make a long story short I am a short Marine in stature and have short arms. I love to shoot that shotgun in rapid fire. In fact they called me the shotgun rabbit because I can empty out the tube in a hurry. Anyways, with my short arms and rapid firing I would short pump the shotgun and jam the weapon. It seems that pump shotguns are not well designed for short armed
people. With that short history. when I bought my own shotgun I took it to the gunsmith to shorten the pump and after that the shotgun worked like a champ.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 9:58:52 PM EDT
In my limited experience, I've never seen it happen to the point of jamming. I myself have "short stroked" my 870 only in that the spent shell was ejected but the next shell wasn't fed from the mag tube, so there was a "click" instead of a "boom." Which was solved by racking the slide again.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 10:24:32 PM EDT
Short stroking is a purely operator induced malfunction.

The "fix" is to practice with the gun to the point where you simply don't make that mistake anymore.

One good point about the pump gun is, since it's manually operated it's as reliable as the operator makes it.
The way to make the gun reliable is to practice operating it.

Vietnam Navy SEAL Chief James Watson wrote in his book "Pointman" that he and another SEAL practiced loading and operating their shotguns to the point where their hands bled.

Watson said it soon got to the point were it seemed the gun just operated itself, and his left hand seemed to have a mind of it's own by automatically loading more shells in the magazine without him actually having to think about it.

Unless you have short arms like 99Medic does, short stroking is a sign of lack of practice.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 1:30:22 AM EDT
I went to a Marine Corps shoot that used purly 870s. EVERYONE that was in my group was short-stroking all the 870s they had there.

Even I was short-stroking the POS's even after much experience with my mossberg 590. I have always owned a mossberg and from day 1 to now I have NEVER short-stroked it. I would trust my life to my mossberg but would be very nervous if all I had was the Remington.


I have no bias...that is just what happened.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 1:35:17 AM EDT
It's not a Remington problem, its an operator problem. And its relativley easy to do, unless you practice a lot.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 2:10:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
It's not a Remington problem, its an operator problem. And its relativley easy to do, unless you practice a lot.




Having NO experience I picked up the Mossberg and never short-stroked it. The same cannot be said for the Remington.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 2:15:11 AM EDT
How often do you shoot Remingtons? I short stroked a Remington roughly 1 time in 3k rounds fired, and it was clearly operator error.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 2:23:22 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 2:39:22 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 5:05:51 AM EDT
The only one I've done it with is a Winchester. The action is so smooth and fast that you can't really feel where you are in the stroke. I own a Remington now.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 11:37:27 AM EDT
I have done it with a Remington 870 Express. I have only done it on a few times, and every time I did was pheasent hunting.
I have not done it on a Ithica 37, BPS, Winchester 12, Winchester 97, or Mossberg 500, Benelli Nova and Hi Standard.

Oh well, I never have to worry about that problem any more because I only shoot Benelli's or Beretta's.

I sold my other pumps except for the Winchesters, Mossbergs and one Remington. Because I like semi autos vs a pump.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 12:12:37 PM EDT
I've never had an issue with short stroking. I'm more likely to break it than anything else.

However, I have a buddy that short strokes my Shotty all the time. That's actually a good thing, 'cause he'd clean my clock at skeet if he ever learned to make that thing load every time.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 1:18:53 PM EDT
SHort stroking is easy if you have short arms or get lazy. I have short stroked twice during a day at the range and learned form my error. I found the easiest way for me to avoid short stroking was to pull the pump back sharply all the way, pause for a *fraction* of a second, and then sharply send it forward- basically two independent actions. I think a lot of people try to rack back-and-forth all in one action, and that is where there problem comes in.

Yeah, I probably lose a half second or something doing it 'my way' but that is a lot less time and frustration than having to clear jammed rounds, trust me!

If someone can suggest a better method, by all means go ahead. I had no one to teach me, so it would not suprise me if there is a better method...
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 2:23:07 PM EDT
The only time I've ever short-stroked a shotgun was during turkey season this past spring. I was using a borrowed Mossberg 835. I guess the added length of the 3 1/2" shells was just enough to cause me to short-stroke it during the rush to get a second shot at a then-running tom.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 5:49:53 PM EDT
Dawg180:
Great minds think alike.

That's exactly the method I settled on.
Speed-wise it's just as fast, and is really more of a mind-set in dividing the operation into two distinct movements.
Instead of the mind set of Backforward, it's slam back, slam forward.
The "pause" between back and forward is indistinguishable to an observer.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 4:34:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dawg180:
SHort stroking is easy if you have short arms or get lazy. I have short stroked twice during a day at the range and learned form my error. I found the easiest way for me to avoid short stroking was to pull the pump back sharply all the way, pause for a *fraction* of a second, and then sharply send it forward- basically two independent actions. I think a lot of people try to rack back-and-forth all in one action, and that is where there problem comes in.

Yeah, I probably lose a half second or something doing it 'my way' but that is a lot less time and frustration than having to clear jammed rounds, trust me!

If someone can suggest a better method, by all means go ahead. I had no one to teach me, so it would not suprise me if there is a better method...



I have / am both I did it twice this morning on a shoot and load drill. I was shooting some leftover 3" shells but still-Practice,practice,practice!
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 5:02:39 PM EDT
I was taught to pump it like you mean it. The only gun I ever saw short stroked was my own Ithaca in someone elses hands. As they only have one hole, the gun is timed to release the new shell pretty late.
Top Top