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Posted: 10/1/2011 12:00:33 PM EST
Need some advice, getting ready to order a set of 30.06 dies to reload for a 03A3 and M1 and am comparing Dillon Dies and the Hornady New Dimension Dies and am wondering if the Dillon Dies are worth the extra coin ? I only own Dillon dies now (9MM and .308) and have looked at the Hornady set and they do look well made for like $25 less, the Hornady set uses a combo seater\crimp and I have the powder die and funnel and the conversion kit already (same as .308) I don't plan on loading alot of 30.06 maybe shoot 200 month.

Thanks

Link Posted: 10/1/2011 12:48:58 PM EST
I use the Hornady dies, in my 550B works like any other dies.
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 1:28:19 PM EST
I used the Hornady New Dimension Dies and got to much runout. I switched to the Forster dies and like them a lot better
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 1:41:28 PM EST
I believe some of the reason for Dillon's higher price is the carbide expander ball that comes standard.
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 2:27:14 PM EST
You guys are making Dillon choice easy, the Hornady dies look good and see quality made but I guess Dillon cost more for a reason I was just thinking I could save a few $$
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 2:44:36 PM EST
Brand X die for Brand X press, only exception to my rule is single stage operation. If your running a 650, 1050 Dillon, carbide is the only way to go. just purchased a set of Dillon Carbide, product number 21101 in .223. It's the shit, ima tellin ya.

Anyway, I don't know if carbide is available in your caliber, my concern with using another make die is index alignment. Dillon dies are made specifically for Dillon index.
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 3:06:22 PM EST
Originally Posted By 1911smith:
Brand X die for Brand X press, only exception to my rule is single stage operation. If your running a 650, 1050 Dillon, carbide is the only way to go. just purchased a set of Dillon Carbide, product number 21101 in .223. It's the shit, ima tellin ya.

Anyway, I don't know if carbide is available in your caliber, my concern with using another make die is index alignment. Dillon dies are made specifically for Dillon index.


1911smith,

Carbide is not available in 30.06 but I do have 9MM and .308 in STD Dillon Dies and have been 100% pleased with zero issues over the last 3 years, the Mrs. said just buy what you know and have had luck with and be done, my plan was to buy the dies from brianenos along with 2 toolheads and put the sizer in one toolhead and then the rest of the dies in the 2nd one with a universal decapper in station 1 to clear media in the flash hole before loading (this is what I did in my .308 setup)

Link Posted: 10/1/2011 3:16:40 PM EST
You gain absolutely nothing going with Dillon Carbide dies, sorry still gotta lube. Dillon's sole intent is for the high volume user. Which most are not ever going to wear out a normal die. Personally the best thing about 3 die sets are you get the separate crimp die. Which is a great idea. Seating is one step, and if you elect to crimp it should be done as a separate step.

Regular Dillon dies are just fine!
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 3:29:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2011 4:03:19 PM EST by 1911smith]
.223 is the only rifle caliber I'm reloading on XL650. I've got some expensive bench rest dies in RCBS and Redding but reserve those for single stage operation with only LaPua or new Winchester brass. Have Hornady New Dimension .223 dies for AP press. BUT...

If you look at bottom of Dillon dies, you get the idea quickly that they are beveled for Dillons index.

Now that said, I can make the other dies work and probably wouldn't have an issue 19 out of 20 strokes of the handle. That twentieth may require handle to be backed off a smidge or reach in and correct alignment.

That does nothing but irritate the hell out of me.


Just the anticipation alone sends me into spastic fits and ruins the whole experience for me. Now remember who your hearing here.... Mr. I load with Lee and manufacture match grade hand loads. My Lee presses are meticulously tuned and I only run Lee dies with them. That's because Lee dies are made to index with Lee press.

I tried a set of New Dimension one time in my Loadmaster and it was miserable. When I was finally able to steal a set of Lee .40S&W, the New Dimension dies were stored and haven't been used since. I'll get them back out to load .40 on AP press.

Same experience running Lee FCD in either AP, 450 or 650 machines. FCD doesn't align perfectly every time, sending me into lunar orbital, spasmastical apprehension.

Save yourself a couple trips to the pharmacy a month, buy the dies meant to operate with your press.


Wonder where I left that bottle of Wellbutrin.
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 3:34:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2011 3:37:23 PM EST by 1911smith]
Originally Posted By rn22723:
You gain absolutely nothing going with Dillon Carbide dies, sorry still gotta lube. Dillon's sole intent is for the high volume user. Which most are not ever going to wear out a normal die. Personally the best thing about 3 die sets are you get the separate crimp die. Which is a great idea. Seating is one step, and if you elect to crimp it should be done as a separate step.

Regular Dillon dies are just fine!


I won't argue the fact that regular Dillon dies work fine, but I'll guarandamntee you they're worth every penny of what I spent and wouldn't dream of being without them.... Until you have a set you just don't or can't dream of the difference they make.

Minimal spray necessary, load'em into case feeder and crank like hell..... size and trim 800 in an hour no problem if your arm doesn't fall off from over revolution.

I just can't do the dies justice with mere words.
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 6:55:32 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/2/2011 2:08:21 AM EST
all my rifle dies are Hornady, but then again I size rifle brass on a single stage. I like Hornadys' floating bullet seater system, allows the projectile to line up straighter before seating. The zip spindle is good as well as it prevents the decapping rod in the sizing die from being pushed up, the older Hornady sizing dies had a collette which held the decappng rod in place by pure friction.
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