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Posted: 8/26/2004 6:14:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/26/2004 6:24:44 PM EST by 199]
Got this idea from someone else, but it worked great so I thought I’d post it here. Basically, it involves converting a nut driver to a Lee-Enfield firing pin removal tool.

The concept is so simple that it actually doesn’t need much elaboration.

Still, here’s what worked for me:

After making a few measurements and checking them against various nut drivers at Lowes, I bought the Klein Tools 3/8 nut driver shown below for $4.68 plus tax. (My local Home Depot also carries this same tool at a slightly higher price)

It took maybe 15 minutes using a Dremel with a cut off wheel to fully modify the nut driver. Surprisingly, the steel was quite a bit softer than I expected – the Dremel cut through it very easily. This nut driver is chrome plated, so forget using a hacksaw or file on it!

For my particular firing pin, I cut the two tabs on the end to the tool to about .12” for both the width and depth. You don’t want to make the tabs too small since they’ll break off easily. However, I suggest you don’t try for a snug fit in the firing pin notches either since, if the tabs do break off (and they might), you may have a difficult time getting the broken-off tabs out of the bolt.

Note that the hole in the shank of the nut driver needs to be deep enough to let the front of the firing pin feed into it. Some aren’t. The above nut driver has a hollow shank to begin with.

Hopefully someone will find this useful.


Link Posted: 8/26/2004 6:26:28 PM EST
Neccessity is the mother of invention. Good job
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 10:47:17 PM EST
Hehe....I made a tool like that about 10 years ago! Still using it too.

Some Enfield FP's are REALLY stuck in there tight, and you can attach Channel Locks to the shaft to get more torque.

FWIW, my nut driver was a hardened one, so it has lasted some brutal wrenchings. If yours poops out on a tough pin removal, you can also make a tool using rolled hollow steel tubing, and cross drilling a handle. Seen that done before too.
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 1:33:17 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/27/2004 11:34:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/28/2004 8:41:42 PM EST by 199]

Originally Posted By swingset:
...you can attach Channel Locks to the shaft to get more torque....


I suspect the nut driver I modified couldn’t withstand the “channel lock” test!! I’m still a little dismayed at how soft the steel was. (No wonder it was so cheap!)

However, I did use it to successfully disassemble the two SMLE bolts that I have.

Given that the firing pins are fixed in place with a lock screw, I had hoped they wouldn’t be screwed on too tight. However, one was really stuck (despite a good soaking with penetrating oil) and I was very careful to apply gradually increasing pressure as I turned the tool to avoid snapping the tabs.

In hindsight maybe I should have gotten a better nut driver (maybe a Craftsman?). But quite frankly, given the additional cost together with the time required to modify it, Brownells legit $20 SMLE tool might be a better way to go.

Anyway, FWIW.
Link Posted: 8/28/2004 6:44:46 PM EST
Definitely going to make one of these! Thanks!
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 12:20:44 AM EST

Originally Posted By 199:
In hindsight maybe I should have gotten a better nut driver (maybe a Craftsman?). But quite frankly, given the additional cost together with the time required to modify it, Brownells legit $20 SMLE tool might be a better way to go.

Anyway, FWIW.



I broke 2 Brownells tools before I made my own. They're made out of crappy metal too.

FWIW, the nut driver set that Harbor Freight sells is pretty hard, has lasted alot of firing pins!
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