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Posted: 11/30/2007 6:12:13 PM EDT
Anybody have any experience with either one of these in .22LR? Which would be the better one? Reliability issues with either. How do the group? Basically I'm looking for any pros & cons of each rifle.

The Henry is about $230 at Wally World & in stock, while the Marlin is about $450 & needs special ordered.
Link Posted: 11/30/2007 6:17:22 PM EDT
I've got a Golden 39A that dates from about 1969. It's a VERY sweet shooter, pretty much capable of one hole accuracy if you feed it top quality ammo. It's simple, accurate, reliable, and has great balance.

I can't compare it to the Henry but the 39A IS a great gun and a true classic, for GOOD reason.


CJ
Link Posted: 11/30/2007 6:20:16 PM EDT
Henry Big Boy is on my list..
Link Posted: 11/30/2007 6:29:27 PM EDT
Can't say anything about the Henry in .22 but I picked up a Henry Big Boy in .44 a couple months ago and all I can say is WOW. The action is butter smooth and it is far more accurate then I am. I had no problem hitting pop cans at 100 yards with it.
Link Posted: 12/1/2007 3:07:36 AM EDT
Henry - no contest. While an old Marlin is nice, the Henry's are better in my opinion. Hell - get two for the price of a Marlin. I've got a Golden Boy in 22lr and the youth model 22lr lever actions -one with bling and full size, one blued and short/easy to pack around, tie to the quad, whatever- both are smooth as butter, very very accurate and fun to pack around - then step up to the Big Boys 44mag/45lc....perfect rigs!
Link Posted: 12/1/2007 4:14:28 AM EDT
Marlin is a nicer gun BUT it's longer and heavier than the Henry. That's my only beef with the Marlin if I have to carry it in the woods all day.

The only thing gold on a Golden 39 is the trigger BTW.
Link Posted: 12/1/2007 4:44:13 AM EDT
I own the henry (3 or 4 years old) and it is butter smooth. I have friends that own the marlins and have shot them.
My henry is starting to have finish problems. You also don't have much choice with sights you get what you get. There isn't much of any way to mount a peep for example.
The buzz is that the henry has some plastic internals that make it so smooth but in the extreme long run this could cause problems
If you had the money I actually think the Marlin might be the better choice but the Henry is a very nice rifle
Link Posted: 12/1/2007 8:49:45 AM EDT
Thanks for all the replies, I am leaning towards the Henry right now for two reasons in particular. First, the price is pretty much half of the Marlin, & reason #2 is Dad has a Marlin already (which I have yet to shoot & it's what's got me wanting one of these to begin with), which he bought when he was 14 (he's 60 now).

So one day (hopefully a long, long, long time from now) I am sure I will inherit the Marlin.

As for the Henry having plastic parts, if they wear out their warranty would cover that, right?

Thanks & please keep the replies coming.
Link Posted: 12/1/2007 10:34:12 AM EDT
I've seen henry's with finish issues, paint coming off parts. They're accurate enough but they feel less durable than the marlin. The receiver is alloy if IRC.

I'd go marlin all the way or maybe you can find a 9422 if you want another choice.

I personally like the marlin cowboy .22s although they're stupid heavy for what they are.

My lever .22 is a newer 9422 with the pistol grip. It replaced the straight grip one I had back in the 80's. other than the straight grip the old one was better finished than the new one and it had a better trigger.
Link Posted: 12/1/2007 2:35:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
I'd go marlin all the way or maybe you can find a 9422 if you want another choice.


Is this 9422 that you're referring to a Winchester (that's all I come up with searching on GB)? If so they are a little rich for my blood, & more than I would ever want to spend on a stock .22lr gun.

Thanks for the suggestion though, & you're insight on the Henry.
Link Posted: 12/1/2007 7:06:02 PM EDT
Browning makes a nice lever 22. Not as big and heavy as the Marlin 39A but very high quality. It is more expensive than the Henry of course.
Link Posted: 12/2/2007 3:11:25 AM EDT
good point on the Henry's finish - the bottom line standard size and youth (short/light and great for carrying around all day) do have some type of super light alloy/etc receiver that the finish will wear off of quick - point being it's a hunting/camping rifle - not a show piece. If you don't like wear on your guns, don't use em....

and the brass golden boys are the bomb!! the finish won't change much at all if you maintain your guns - looks old school and wears like the old guns of the west - plus the way cool octagon barrel - just a great rifle all around...
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 6:28:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hk45shooter:

Originally Posted By SteelonSteel:
I'd go marlin all the way or maybe you can find a 9422 if you want another choice.


Is this 9422 that you're referring to a Winchester (that's all I come up with searching on GB)? If so they are a little rich for my blood, & more than I would ever want to spend on a stock .22lr gun.

Thanks for the suggestion though, & you're insight on the Henry.


Yup, that's the last winchester lever .22 model...sigh.....I bought mine for about $325 on close out from Gander mountain. I could be wrong but I thought the Marlins were every bit the same in price.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 10:36:31 PM EDT
The Henry is a nice rifle but the Marlin is better (better materials, more solid feel). Both are accurate and reliable. Check out the Browning BL-22 also, it is a nice gun too. The Henry is the most readily available and the least expensive and will serve just fine but I prefer the others.
Link Posted: 12/5/2007 5:59:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/5/2007 6:00:55 AM EDT by Green_Canoe]
It just so happens I have the Henry, the Marlin 39, and the Browning BL-22.

The Henry is smooth to operate but the construction is cast aluminum(zinc?) and the finish is essentially an e-coat paint from what I can tell. Good for the price but not heirloom quality.

The Marlin is what a gun should be, machined from forgings and blued. It is the heaviest of the lot but it is a sweet shooter and very smooth in operation. It is heirloom quality. In fact the one in my collection was my wifes grandfather's and now his great-grandchildren have used it as their first .22.

The BL-22 is also a fine quality arm. The finish is better than the Marlin, mirror polish before blueing. The barrel is a slimmer profile than the Marlin which makes it easier to carry but not as steady when shooting. The short lever throw is stiffer as you are doing the same work as the Marlin or Henry in half the distance. No problem for an adult, but difficult for young kids. The Browning is also heiloom quality.

The downside to the Browning and the Marlin is they cost twice or more than the Henry, but quality comes with a price. When I pass on my firearms to my two children, one of my sons will get the Browning, one will get the Marlin, and I doubt the Henry will stay with me until the day I die as it is mearly a commodity to be traded on another gun deal.
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