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Posted: 3/29/2009 5:48:07 PM EDT
I must've picked up some of this stuff last time I was at the range. Headstamp is "FC NT" over "9mm LUGER". I assume it's a non-toxic load. First off, the primers were crimped. I took those out with a reamer, same as I have for military 9mm cases without a problem. However, when I went to prime some today, I ended up smashing a few primers into them. Turns out the primer pockets are a couple thousandths smaller than those in the other brass I was working with. I ended up looking at each headstamp before I primed them and just tossing the FC NT stuff into the scrap box.
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 5:55:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2009 5:59:46 PM EDT by ma96782]
Interesting.

Did you mean that the depth wasn't cut to the correct depth?

Or, did you actually mean to say that the reamer didn't ream the pocket to the correct diameter size?

What style of tool did you use to actually cut the crimp?
________________________

Small Primer Pocket Size #7777784

www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=643126

or..........

www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=364181&t=11082005

________________________


Aloha, Mark

PS.........and what brand of primers were you using?







Link Posted: 3/29/2009 6:14:59 PM EDT
The second. Not that one, though, it's a countersink style one from RCBS that puts a chamfer on the pocket. Primers were CCI 500's. The diameter of the pocket was a couple thousandths smaller, I didn't measure the depth. The primers were getting hung up on the way in, they didn't make it to the bottom of the pocket.
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 6:20:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2009 6:31:59 PM EDT by ma96782]
OK.....you made me look.

I have about 600 loaded 9mm on my bench. They started, as range pick-up brass.

No, NT brass in the lot.

But, I also noted a fair amount of military cases with remnants of their crimp. And, as best I can remember.........I didn't ream them. And, to be fair..........the primers on the military cases appear to have been flattened a bit (during seating) vs. the primers in the commercial cases.

I loaded this brass a *&% load of times on my LEE M1000 (progressive).

Aloha, Mark

Link Posted: 3/29/2009 6:24:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2009 6:28:24 PM EDT by ma96782]
Originally Posted By Eric802:
The second. Not that one, though, it's a countersink style one from RCBS that puts a chamfer on the pocket. Primers were CCI 500's. The diameter of the pocket was a couple thousandths smaller, I didn't measure the depth. The primers were getting hung up on the way in, they didn't make it to the bottom of the pocket.


IMHO, wrong tool for the job.............

IMHO…..DON'T USE THIS STYLE OF TOOL..........

www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=364181&t=11082005

Someone once asked: Why Not?

A standard reamer/de-burr tool could be used but, your results will vary greatly. In my younger days I tried using it but, I encountered problems with getting squared cuts and sometimes over doing it. YMWV.

Currently, I use these tools......

Large Primer Pocket Size #7777785

www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=682934

Small Primer Pocket Size #7777784

www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=643126

With, the Lyman Hand tool I've eliminated those problems. It has a safe edge on the bottom.....it won't cut the pocket deeper. The cutter will simply spin, via hand power, cutting off the crimp. It'll leave a slight chamfer to the primer pocket opening. It will correct an undersized pocket and an "out of round" condition, but only to the limits of the tool's cutting edge, under hand power. The main pocket diameter won't (under most circumstances) be enlarged excessively, unless you force the tool to the sidewalls. And, the cutting edge can be dulled, IF you wanted to do that. It's a "hand tool" and I wouldn't mount it in a drill........but, that's ME.

BTW, my Speer #10 Re-loading manual has a picture of a pocket knife being used to cut a military crimp out (page 71).

And, for commercial cases, IF needed, the Lyman hand tool will also slightly "chamfer" the primer pocket opening that has that "sharp edge." And, while it's in there.....IF, the primer pocket is too small, it'll do it's magic for that problem, too. Then again, sometimes just changing your brand of primer can work.

Perhaps, using the wrong tool and/or other misusage of a hand de-crimp reamer, may be the reason why, some people are so anti-reamer?

You know the saying about using the right tool for the job?

Well, IMHO......the right tool, is the one specially made for the job of addressing the crimp. In this case, I use a Lyman Hand military de-crimp reamer tool.

Not to mention that, the learning curve is so short. Just insert the tool into the primer pocket, twist, remove the tool and it’s done. It’s the sort of a mindless operation, that I can do while watching T.V.



*My blue color added, for this post.

Aloha, Mark




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