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Durkin Tactical Franklin Armory
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Posted: 4/19/2016 11:16:58 PM EDT
I have a GM-22, and while it does the job well, I have to admit that I am disappointed with it. The problem is the design for disassembly. The first time I screwed it onto my gun, I found that simply hand tightening the suppressor to the gun had also tightened the tube to the core. It was very hard to separate after that. Then, after shooting the suppressor I had to get a strap wrench to separate the tube from the core. After the second time to the range I simply can't separate the core from the tube.



The upside is that I will probably never shoot enough ammo through this thing to the point that I kill the suppressor by failing to clean it. It was hardly fouled after the first 100 rounds I put through it and the gun I bought it for isn't something I shoot a lot. But, overall, I am unimpressed. Now, Gemtech's other core suppressors (GM-9 and GM-45) seem to solve this issue by having a longer core base (due to the piston?) than the GM-22, so I am not saying that overall their core designed suppressors are bad.




What are your opinions of the GM-22?




I also have a Form 4 out for a Surefire Ryder 22, which seems like a better designed suppressor. I bought this for a gun that I do shoot, so I am anxious to get it out of jail.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 11:43:44 PM EDT
[#1]
I have the same problem with my GM-9.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 11:43:49 PM EDT
[#2]
I own one but have very little trigger time, sorry
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 11:53:44 PM EDT
[#3]
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 12:04:45 AM EDT
[#4]
I had one demoed for me and the dealer used a set of padded vise jaws to hold the suppressor in place while using a 1/4" drive socket wrench to unscrew the core from the tube. That seemed to work fairly well for getting them apart. Have you tried that method yet?

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 12:20:46 AM EDT
[#5]


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



I had one demoed for me and the dealer used a set of padded vise jaws to hold the suppressor in place while using a 1/4" drive socket wrench to unscrew the core from the tube. That seemed to work fairly well for getting them apart. Have you tried that method yet?





Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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I tried the strap wrench with the 1/4" socket wrench. The muzzle of my silencer is dinged up and there are, what seem to be, permanent marks on the tube from the strap wrench. I stopped after that.







I will say, that the sound reduction of the silencer is good. With subsonic ammo, this thing is James Bond quiet on the gun I got it for.

 
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 7:37:51 AM EDT
[#6]
I've got an IOU converted Pilot.  My issue was keeping the core tight, but it screws in from the muzzle side.  Basically the same core as the GM-22 though.  A little Teflon tape fixed that issue.  I put about 150 rounds through it on Saturday and I did use a 1/4" drive, but it came apart.  Wasn't very dirty inside.  Pretty much knocked most of the gunk out.  Shooting Remington Golden Bullet bulk pack and Winchester Super X.  Nice and quiet.  Quieter than my HTA Fusion T22.....
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 8:09:22 AM EDT
[#7]
I put two boxes of Winchester 333 and 100 CCI subs through mine this past weekend and got mine apart.  I do put a bit of anti-seize on the threads before reassembling and the core broke free about half way through the range session.  

The part i hate is the tube is very hard to clean even with a a soda blaster.  They should have made a two piece sleeve for the monocore to slide inside the tube like the Sparrow.  

But the size and length is awesome.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:34:03 AM EDT
[#8]
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:58:37 AM EDT
[#9]
I have had success with the method described below. I also own a Sparrow and can say it is still able to be taken apart by hand after over a thousand rounds have been sent through it. It is much heavier though!

Disassembly:
0: Soak the silencer in WD-40 or Kroil. I only do this if the tube is really stuck, and haven't had to after using anti seize as described below.

1: Place a 1/4" drive socket adapter in the vice with the 1/4" drive straight up. You need a sturdy vice that is fixed to a strong workstation. The socket adapter is better than using a normal socket extension because it has flats that keep it from spinning in the vice. Example:  http://www.lowes.com/pd_296767-70-DW2541IR++G_1z0wcg8__?productId=3213023&pl=1

2: Place the suppressor onto the 1/4" drive.

3: Use a rubber strap wrench to spin the tube off. I place the strap just below the threaded area of the tube.

Re-Assembly:
1: Knock off as much crud as possible from the core and tube, they don't have to be perfect. Get the threads squeaky clean!

2: I coat the entire core and tube ID with a thin film of anti seize. It shouldn't be dripping off of it or obstructing the bore in any way. I put alot on the threads of each. I am thinking about ordering some of the Lok Cease to try out in place of the anti seize.

3: Spin the tube onto the core hand tight. Anti seize will come out between the seam of the tube and core where they are threaded, just wipe it away.

4: After shooting while still at the range, tap the suppressor on a wood surface and try to spin the tube loose. Don't take the tube off, all you want to do is keep the tube from seizing up.

5: If you couldn't get the tube loose at the range break it loose using the vice method above. You don't have to take it apart and clean it, just get it loose and then hand tighten it back up. You can put alot of rounds through it before you actually need to clean it if you follow these steps.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 11:25:15 AM EDT
[#10]
Thanks for the honest evaluations.  I have been holding back from ordering one of these.  I have a GM-9 and GM-45 on order.  I am leaning toward the Tac-Sol due to the split sleeve sleeve around the cones, or some other brand with protected, snap-together cones.  I think I have made my decision now, and of course, what I need is out of stock.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 11:45:59 AM EDT
[#11]
I own a GM-22 and never really had any issues after shooting! I do make it a habit of just unscrewing the tube after I finish a session just to keep the crud from hardening.

I did have an issue right out of the box though and needed the 1/4 drive to open it...... other then that no issues!

I like the weight and size of it compared to many so i can deal with the potential issues of disassemble problems
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 3:41:48 PM EDT
[#12]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I own a GM-22 and never really had any issues after shooting! I do make it a habit of just unscrewing the tube after I finish a session just to keep the crud from hardening.

I did have an issue right out of the box though and needed the 1/4 drive to open it...... other then that no issues!

I like the weight and size of it compared to many so i can deal with the potential issues of disassemble problems
View Quote

You're saving yourself tons of frustration by doing that. The GM-22 is why I now recommend taking rimfire cans apart after each session. You don't have to scrub it, but make sure you break the core away from the tube.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 3:44:18 PM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

You're saving yourself tons of frustration by doing that. The GM-22 is why I now recommend taking rimfire cans apart after each session. You don't have to scrub it, but make sure you break the core away from the tube.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I own a GM-22 and never really had any issues after shooting! I do make it a habit of just unscrewing the tube after I finish a session just to keep the crud from hardening.

I did have an issue right out of the box though and needed the 1/4 drive to open it...... other then that no issues!

I like the weight and size of it compared to many so i can deal with the potential issues of disassemble problems

You're saving yourself tons of frustration by doing that. The GM-22 is why I now recommend taking rimfire cans apart after each session. You don't have to scrub it, but make sure you break the core away from the tube.

  I need to remember doing that combined with lubing before a shooting session. My Liberty Regulator and Mystic X can be very tough to separate tube from core if I don't lube prior to shooting.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 11:52:44 PM EDT
[#14]
I have a couple GM22s and an updated and cored Outback iiD. I easily have thousands of rounds through all them with no issues of them not cracking open.
BHM is correct to open them after a session while they are hot(good idea with any can) If you forget, pop it in the oven for 10 min and warm it up.
Carbon is nasty shit at times so I prevent it also with choke tube grease on the threads.
Imo the GM22 is a fantastic can and I hope to get my hands on a couple more before 41f.
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 12:22:13 AM EDT
[#15]
As others have said, unscrewing the core slightly after each range session is the key to eliminating your frustration.  I've had an AAC Prodigy for nine years and my upgraded IOU OB2 for a little over a year, works like a charm for both of them.  I only loosen it about one to two rotations then tighten it back down.  I forgot to do this w/ my Prodigy about a month ago and I had to use the disassembly tool to get it to move again.
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 6:33:30 AM EDT
[#16]
I actually prefer cleaning my GM-22 over my other baffle stack .22 cans.

After a range session, just pop it open and take a brush to the monocore for a couple of minutes, then brushing the inside of the tube out, very light coat of CLP, and good to go.  That said, I usually don't go more than a couple of hundred of rounds max between sessions.  

I figure spending a couple of minutes after each session beats waiting going past a whole bunch of rounds and then having issues.  

The can is just easy to take apart right there (and not lose pieces) than not to and wait.
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 11:35:17 AM EDT
[#17]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:





You're saving yourself tons of frustration by doing that. The GM-22 is why I now recommend taking rimfire cans apart after each session. You don't have to scrub it, but make sure you break the core away from the tube.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:

I own a GM-22 and never really had any issues after shooting! I do make it a habit of just unscrewing the tube after I finish a session just to keep the crud from hardening.



I did have an issue right out of the box though and needed the 1/4 drive to open it...... other then that no issues!



I like the weight and size of it compared to many so i can deal with the potential issues of disassemble problems


You're saving yourself tons of frustration by doing that. The GM-22 is why I now recommend taking rimfire cans apart after each session. You don't have to scrub it, but make sure you break the core away from the tube.




 
I would point out, that this isn't a situation where I shot the suppressor and let it sit and not can't separate the tube from the core. I had problems getting the two pieces apart before I ever even fired the suppressor. I usually clean my guns as soon as I get home, before they even go back into the safe.
Link Posted: 4/22/2016 5:24:45 PM EDT
[#18]
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