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Posted: 7/26/2013 3:39:44 PM EDT
I just picked up a rifle from my LGS that's marked on the side of the reciever GEW 88.  On top of the reciever it's marked SPANDAU 1890 with a crown over that and an S over the crown.  Everything is matching and the blueing is really good.  The wood is in pretty good shape, showing some wear and tear.  On the barrel band closest to the reciever it has a bunch of symbols that are all x'd out.  Now here's the thing- The barrel has a very slight bend to it.  IDK iif it's the barrel or barrel shroud but it's probably both.  Now the little research that I've done tells me it's a german gun.  Here are my questions,
1. What exactly do I have?

2.Can I get the barrel straightened by a gunsmith even if it's just for looks and never to fire( I don't think I'll be shooting this one)?

3.I know you haven't seen pics, and I don't know how to post them but this thing is nice. I'd put it in good to very good minus the bent barrel-figures right? How much is it worth in it's current condition?

4.Is this a C&R? I've read some say yes and some no, do I have to log it in my book?

5.Can I get a new barrel for this if the one I have can't be straightened? Would it affect the value given that all numbers match including the barrel?

I paid $75 for it and never expect to fire it cause of the barrel, just to put in my collection or as a wall hanger so I think I did pretty good.  Thanks for the answers.
Link Posted: 7/26/2013 3:44:32 PM EDT
[#1]
You have a Gewehr 88 Commission rifle. It is not a Mauser, though some people erroneously call it one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gewehr_1888

The bend may just be in the barrel jacket. Many are dented or misshapen from abuse over the years. Have it checked out.

I'm not overly up-to-date on value of these things but they're not worth a ton. Maybe $500 for a really, really nice early unconverted example. Turkish-marked ones are quite a bit less, especially if they don't have the barrel jacket any more.

This rifle is not a C&R. Do not enter it in your bound book. It is an antique, and not regulated as a firearm in any way. No FFL is required to transfer it, it can be sold to anyone 18 and over cash and carry.

ETA: I hope they didn't log this at the local gun shop. They are not supposed to log antiques.
Link Posted: 7/26/2013 4:01:50 PM EDT
[#2]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
You have a Gewehr 88 Commission rifle. It is not a Mauser, though some people erroneously call it one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gewehr_1888

The bend may just be in the barrel jacket. Many are dented or misshapen from abuse over the years. Have it checked out.

I'm not overly up-to-date on value of these things but they're not worth a ton. Maybe $500 for a really, really nice early unconverted example. Turkish-marked ones are quite a bit less, especially if they don't have the barrel jacket any more.

This rifle is not a C&R. Do not enter it in your bound book. It is an antique, and not regulated as a firearm in any way. No FFL is required to transfer it, it can be sold to anyone 18 and over cash and carry.

ETA: I hope they didn't log this at the local gun shop. They are not supposed to log antiques.
View Quote


No they didn't log it, it's actually a friend of mine and he didn't think we needed to. How do I tell if it's Turkish-marked?  Thanks for the info.
Link Posted: 7/26/2013 4:09:23 PM EDT
[#3]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


No they didn't log it, it's actually a friend of mine and he didn't think we needed to. How do I tell if it's Turkish-marked?  Thanks for the info.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
You have a Gewehr 88 Commission rifle. It is not a Mauser, though some people erroneously call it one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gewehr_1888

The bend may just be in the barrel jacket. Many are dented or misshapen from abuse over the years. Have it checked out.

I'm not overly up-to-date on value of these things but they're not worth a ton. Maybe $500 for a really, really nice early unconverted example. Turkish-marked ones are quite a bit less, especially if they don't have the barrel jacket any more.

This rifle is not a C&R. Do not enter it in your bound book. It is an antique, and not regulated as a firearm in any way. No FFL is required to transfer it, it can be sold to anyone 18 and over cash and carry.

ETA: I hope they didn't log this at the local gun shop. They are not supposed to log antiques.


No they didn't log it, it's actually a friend of mine and he didn't think we needed to. How do I tell if it's Turkish-marked?  Thanks for the info.


The ones the Turks reworked are Ankara-marked on the receiver - yours isn't one of those, at least. They're on the bottom of the Gew 88 barrel price-wise. Ones the Turks owned but didn't overhaul will have small crescent marks on small parts.
Link Posted: 7/26/2013 5:02:31 PM EDT
[#4]
Does anyone know what the symbols that are x'd out on the barrel band are? I figure without a pic it will be hard to tell but if it's fairly common and someone knows that would be great.

Also are these rare in the condition mine is in-minus the bent barrel, with all matching numbers and in good condition?
Are they collectable or not so much?
Link Posted: 7/26/2013 5:21:49 PM EDT
[#5]
The x'ed out marks are probably an old German unit marking.

Yours has been converted for IS ammo (S on receiver) so it isn't quite as desirable as one that hasn't. There's not a ton of collector interest in these but as with most milsurps prices are creeping up.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 7/26/2013 9:07:34 PM EDT
[#6]
Does it have a small cut out in front of the bolt on the top of the receiver?  Is the hole on the bottom of the magazine open or does it have a cover over it? You'll want to make sure exactly what you have before you shoot it - might have been converted to Spitzer - might not have - It's been a while, but the bullet diameter is different depending if it retains the 8x57J configuration or if it has been converted to 8x57JS.

The difference of .318 and .323 I think...  

I love these things - I have 4 or 5.  Couple converted, couple not.  One really strange "Sniper setup."  I'll get pics of it tomorrow - it's an odd one.  
Link Posted: 7/27/2013 5:37:53 PM EDT
[#7]
Also make sure that the bolt is complete.  Alot were brought into the country and sold without bolt heads, extractors and ejectors.
Link Posted: 7/27/2013 10:01:42 PM EDT
[#8]
I have an 1890 Steyr Gewehr 88/14 which I bought from Dennis at Empire Arms a couple of years ago.  The 88/14 rifles ditched the en-bloc clip loading and use standard Mauser 5 round stripper clips, or can be loaded singly if one chooses.  They also were updated to work with conventional S. Patrone ammo, which meant I could fire this old thing!  I checked the bore when I bought it just to be safe, since the early unconverted ones can't be fired with modern ammo.  While I can't remember the measurement, it came up safe to shoot with .323" modern S Patrone and s.S. Patrone ammo.  

I prefer to shoot the 154 grain ammo over the 198 grain, because I feel the lighter recoil might stress the ancient stock a bit less.  I have fired many rounds of the good old Romanian steel cased 154 grain 8mm out of this rifle.  It is very accurate, now that I have a taller front sight blade to correct POI to 100 yards, and is a very fun rifle to shoot.  The action is buttery-smooth, as is the loading via stripper clip.  The rifle is so well-balanced that it is very easy to hold on target.  They are very long rifles, but still manage to feel pretty light.  I have never seen another Gewehr 88 at my shooting range, in spite of many other milsurp bolt action rifles of all kinds and types being present.
Link Posted: 7/28/2013 8:20:14 AM EDT
[#9]
Ok, I finally got a chance to take it apart and start cleaning it. Let me start by saying that there are two things I love in this world-women and guns and not always in that order. Taking a gun apart that is new to you for the first time is like undressing a woman for the first time- some may look great on the outside but you really don't know what you have until you strip em, sorry let me get back on topic.

So I took it apart and as I originally thought that the barrel was slightly bent it appears that the outer sleave is the only thing bent.  Also took the bolt apart and it is missing the bolt head or face, anyone know where I can get a replacement?  All the numbers are matching including the stock which I was very happy to see.  The metal below the stock is good, some slight rust on the outer barrel sleeve but really nothing to be worried about. So overall what I got for $75 I think I did really good and am thrilled to have a rifle that's so old and in really good shape.  I might go to a local gunsmith friend and have him try to straighten the barrel sleeve but may not cause I don't want to risk screwing it up.  I'm probably never going to shoot this but I would like it with all of its parts so if anyone knows where to look for the bolt face I would appreciate it.
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