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Posted: 10/4/2014 11:01:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2014 11:02:16 AM EST by Mauser1]
First day in this forum, Hello to the regulars here. Seen a lot of great rifles and hand guns. A suppressor adds a certain amount of style besides functionality. Have thought about stepping into one. Almost 20 years ago I bought a shortened down Remington 511X from a gunsmith for 125$
He cut it down for his grandson but he wanted a 1022. To make it look cool he threaded it and installed a A2 flash hider.
If I could get some input on a couple of questions. It would really help. Been searching through the threads here.

#1 Would this rifle be a good host? Anyone used one. I love the gun. I was thinking of having the CZ scout next to it threaded the same.
It's really accurate.

#2 I have many AR's and should I get a 223 class suppressor and use it on the 22lr or just get a 22lr one and buy a second for the 223's.

Link Posted: 10/4/2014 11:09:40 AM EST
Get both. You don't want to clog up a .223 can with lead from a rimfire.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 11:13:30 AM EST
Welcome. Yes, it would make a good host but only if the threads were done concentric to the bore. And, no, do not get a .223 suppressor and then shoot .22lr through it. If anything, get a 9mm or .45 suppressor that you can disassemble like the Silencerco Octane or Griffin Revolution. Most .223 cans are sealed and .22 is dirty. I would suggest getting a Silencerco Spectre II or Sparrow as a starting point then move on to a rifle and/or pistol suppressor. You can never have too many cans.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 1:17:54 PM EST
What they said ^

Besides the cleaning issues why hang a heavy .223 can on the end of a .22lr? Rimfire cans are relatively inexpensive and if you are entering the world of suppressors for the first time a Rimfire is where to start. Do your research, decide what is most important to you as far as ease of cleaning, sound suppression, wieght, ect.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 1:32:37 PM EST
Barrel was cut at 16.5 then threaded back with the front site remounted. It didn't have a scope when I got it.
He had a great sense of detail and wasn't known for shoddy machine work. He never had a supressor in mind when he did it.
But it sure looked like a easy springboard for me to get started. I didn't know Mr Earp hung around these parts.

I would like to end up with three. 22lr 5.56 and a 9mm for my CZ. I just thought I might be covering the same base twice with the 220/223 bore.
Oh is 600$ a reasonable budget with stamp to get this done? Or not really.
Crappy pic of the CZ I would be looking to do next.

Link Posted: 10/4/2014 6:16:13 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Mauser1:
Oh is 600$ a reasonable budget with stamp to get this done? Or not really.
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Silencer Shop has several .22LR suppressors that will fit in your budget. I'm partial to AAC stuff, at least for now, and Silencer Shop has the Pilot 2 for $260. The Specter 2 is $295 and the Sparrow is $379.

http://www.silencershop.com/shop/category/silencers/rimfire/
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 7:41:11 PM EST
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Originally Posted By cormorantslayer:


Silencer Shop has several .22LR suppressors that will fit in your budget. I'm partial to AAC stuff, at least for now, and Silencer Shop has the Pilot 2 for $260. The Specter 2 is $295 and the Sparrow is $379.

http://www.silencershop.com/shop/category/silencers/rimfire/
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Originally Posted By cormorantslayer:
Originally Posted By Mauser1:
Oh is 600$ a reasonable budget with stamp to get this done? Or not really.


Silencer Shop has several .22LR suppressors that will fit in your budget. I'm partial to AAC stuff, at least for now, and Silencer Shop has the Pilot 2 for $260. The Specter 2 is $295 and the Sparrow is $379.

http://www.silencershop.com/shop/category/silencers/rimfire/


Thanks for the link.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 7:46:18 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2014 7:47:22 PM EST by NightFox]
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Originally Posted By Mauser1:
I would like to end up with three. 22lr 5.56 and a 9mm for my CZ. I just thought I might be covering the same base twice with the 220/223 bore.
Oh is 600$ a reasonable budget with stamp to get this done? Or not really.
View Quote


One suppressor? Sure. Three? The tax stamps alone will be $600. If you had to, you could get an Octane 9 and use that for 22LR and 9mm, since it comes apart for cleaning and has stainless steel baffles. But I think you'll be happier with dedicated suppressors.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 8:11:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2014 8:15:06 PM EST by Engineer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mauser1:
Barrel was cut at 16.5 then threaded back with the front site remounted. It didn't have a scope when I got it.
He had a great sense of detail and wasn't known for shoddy machine work. He never had a supressor in mind when he did it.
But it sure looked like a easy springboard for me to get started. I didn't know Mr Earp hung around these parts.

I would like to end up with three. 22lr 5.56 and a 9mm for my CZ. I just thought I might be covering the same base twice with the 220/223 bore.
Oh is 600$ a reasonable budget with stamp to get this done? Or not really.
Crappy pic of the CZ I would be looking to do next.
View Quote

Still no guarantee that the threading was done concentric to the bore. The quick and cheap way to do it is to sight down the bore with the suppressor mounted. Next step would be to use an appropriate sized drill rod and third would be to actually measure it.

If you want to do double duty, do it on your pistol caliber can. You can get a .45 can and run .40 and 9mm out of it. Most fullsize .45 cans are the same diameter as their 9mm counterparts and only an inch longer and performance losses aren't too noticeable.

$600... for rimfire can, sure. For anything else, probably not. $200 itself will be the cost of the stamp. If you order from a place like Silencer Shop, your local transfer dealer will charge anywhere from $50-100 for a transfer. So almost half of your budget is going towards taxes and fees.

Personally, I don't recommend the Octane for rimfire. Yes, the baffles are stainless, but the birdcage/piston encapsulator is fixed in the can and can't be removed for servicing - so you'll be scrubbing off all the buildup by hand with a brush in order to get your piston back in.

Link Posted: 10/4/2014 8:18:11 PM EST
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Originally Posted By NightFox:


One suppressor? Sure. Three? The tax stamps alone will be $600. If you had to, you could get an Octane 9 and use that for 22LR and 9mm, since it comes apart for cleaning and has stainless steel baffles. But I think you'll be happier with dedicated suppressors.
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Originally Posted By NightFox:
Originally Posted By Mauser1:
I would like to end up with three. 22lr 5.56 and a 9mm for my CZ. I just thought I might be covering the same base twice with the 220/223 bore.
Oh is 600$ a reasonable budget with stamp to get this done? Or not really.


One suppressor? Sure. Three? The tax stamps alone will be $600. If you had to, you could get an Octane 9 and use that for 22LR and 9mm, since it comes apart for cleaning and has stainless steel baffles. But I think you'll be happier with dedicated suppressors.


That's why I chose to start on this one. Looks to be the cheapest to start with and would probably get the most use.
Not super tactical but will let me get through the process once. My plan was one a year or so.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 8:37:36 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Engineer:

Still no guarantee that the threading was done concentric to the bore. The quick and cheap way to do it is to sight down the bore with the suppressor mounted. Next step would be to use an appropriate sized drill rod and third would be to actually measure it.

If you want to do double duty, do it on your pistol caliber can. You can get a .45 can and run .40 and 9mm out of it. Most fullsize .45 cans are the same diameter as their 9mm counterparts and only an inch longer and performance losses aren't too noticeable.

$600... for rimfire can, sure. For anything else, probably not. $200 itself will be the cost of the stamp. If you order from a place like Silencer Shop, your local transfer dealer will charge anywhere from $50-100 for a transfer. So almost half of your budget is going towards taxes and fees.

Personally, I don't recommend the Octane for rimfire. Yes, the baffles are stainless, but the birdcage/piston encapsulator is fixed in the can and can't be removed for servicing - so you'll be scrubbing off all the buildup by hand with a brush in order to get your piston back in.

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Originally Posted By Engineer:
Originally Posted By Mauser1:
Barrel was cut at 16.5 then threaded back with the front site remounted. It didn't have a scope when I got it.
He had a great sense of detail and wasn't known for shoddy machine work. He never had a supressor in mind when he did it.
But it sure looked like a easy springboard for me to get started. I didn't know Mr Earp hung around these parts.

I would like to end up with three. 22lr 5.56 and a 9mm for my CZ. I just thought I might be covering the same base twice with the 220/223 bore.
Oh is 600$ a reasonable budget with stamp to get this done? Or not really.
Crappy pic of the CZ I would be looking to do next.

Still no guarantee that the threading was done concentric to the bore. The quick and cheap way to do it is to sight down the bore with the suppressor mounted. Next step would be to use an appropriate sized drill rod and third would be to actually measure it.

If you want to do double duty, do it on your pistol caliber can. You can get a .45 can and run .40 and 9mm out of it. Most fullsize .45 cans are the same diameter as their 9mm counterparts and only an inch longer and performance losses aren't too noticeable.

$600... for rimfire can, sure. For anything else, probably not. $200 itself will be the cost of the stamp. If you order from a place like Silencer Shop, your local transfer dealer will charge anywhere from $50-100 for a transfer. So almost half of your budget is going towards taxes and fees.

Personally, I don't recommend the Octane for rimfire. Yes, the baffles are stainless, but the birdcage/piston encapsulator is fixed in the can and can't be removed for servicing - so you'll be scrubbing off all the buildup by hand with a brush in order to get your piston back in.


So a nice straight piece of stainless rod should pass from muzzle to breech without any drag or resistance?
I was going to remove the barrel and tin foil my surefire flashlight to the breech then observe against a dark wall what stage the "moon" was.
then with calipers check for size. Anything less than a full moon I was going to call a no go.

As long as light follows a straight line I should have a 220 size dot on my cardboard 4" from the muzzle right?
It's hick I know but I thought that would be the best way to find out.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 8:48:05 PM EST
I have a vice with soft jaws on my reloading bench. I would clamp it there.
If I found it was off the CZ will be heading out for threading.



Link Posted: 10/4/2014 8:53:34 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mauser1:

So a nice straight piece of stainless rod should pass from muzzle to breech without any drag or resistance?
I was going to remove the barrel and tin foil my surefire flashlight to the breech then observe against a dark wall what stage the "moon" was.
then with calipers check for size. Anything less than a full moon I was going to call a no go.

As long as light follows a straight line I should have a 220 size dot on my cardboard 4" from the muzzle right?
It's hick I know but I thought that would be the best way to find out.
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Originally Posted By Mauser1:
Originally Posted By Engineer:
Originally Posted By Mauser1:
Barrel was cut at 16.5 then threaded back with the front site remounted. It didn't have a scope when I got it.
He had a great sense of detail and wasn't known for shoddy machine work. He never had a supressor in mind when he did it.
But it sure looked like a easy springboard for me to get started. I didn't know Mr Earp hung around these parts.

I would like to end up with three. 22lr 5.56 and a 9mm for my CZ. I just thought I might be covering the same base twice with the 220/223 bore.
Oh is 600$ a reasonable budget with stamp to get this done? Or not really.
Crappy pic of the CZ I would be looking to do next.

Still no guarantee that the threading was done concentric to the bore. The quick and cheap way to do it is to sight down the bore with the suppressor mounted. Next step would be to use an appropriate sized drill rod and third would be to actually measure it.

If you want to do double duty, do it on your pistol caliber can. You can get a .45 can and run .40 and 9mm out of it. Most fullsize .45 cans are the same diameter as their 9mm counterparts and only an inch longer and performance losses aren't too noticeable.

$600... for rimfire can, sure. For anything else, probably not. $200 itself will be the cost of the stamp. If you order from a place like Silencer Shop, your local transfer dealer will charge anywhere from $50-100 for a transfer. So almost half of your budget is going towards taxes and fees.

Personally, I don't recommend the Octane for rimfire. Yes, the baffles are stainless, but the birdcage/piston encapsulator is fixed in the can and can't be removed for servicing - so you'll be scrubbing off all the buildup by hand with a brush in order to get your piston back in.


So a nice straight piece of stainless rod should pass from muzzle to breech without any drag or resistance?
I was going to remove the barrel and tin foil my surefire flashlight to the breech then observe against a dark wall what stage the "moon" was.
then with calipers check for size. Anything less than a full moon I was going to call a no go.

As long as light follows a straight line I should have a 220 size dot on my cardboard 4" from the muzzle right?
It's hick I know but I thought that would be the best way to find out.

Since you're a life member, look at this thread in the archives to see what a bad thread job looks like.

Link Posted: 10/4/2014 9:08:04 PM EST
What prompts this is I found a dream job. Well if I was still a kid.
A old friend called me up. We used to shoot pellet guns together. He has taken over his grandfathers dairy.
Ground squirrels are digging around pumps ditch banks and buildings and wanted to know if I still had my RWS.

He said it would be fine to shoot a 22 but when the neighbors hear gunfire they call the sheriff to have them checked out.
With some subsonics and a suppressor I can shoot the squirrels and pigeons all day long.
Anytime I want. The 22 will make it much more humane. Please ignore the smile on my face as I type this.

I will read that thread though and thanks.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 10:36:26 PM EST
Read it through. Seemed like a bit of a cat fight. Posting photos of what I am working with.




Link Posted: 10/5/2014 12:02:42 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Engineer:

Still no guarantee that the threading was done concentric to the bore. The quick and cheap way to do it is to sight down the bore with the suppressor mounted. Next step would be to use an appropriate sized drill rod and third would be to actually measure it.

If you want to do double duty, do it on your pistol caliber can. You can get a .45 can and run .40 and 9mm out of it. Most fullsize .45 cans are the same diameter as their 9mm counterparts and only an inch longer and performance losses aren't too noticeable.

$600... for rimfire can, sure. For anything else, probably not. $200 itself will be the cost of the stamp. If you order from a place like Silencer Shop, your local transfer dealer will charge anywhere from $50-100 for a transfer. So almost half of your budget is going towards taxes and fees.

Personally, I don't recommend the Octane for rimfire. Yes, the baffles are stainless, but the birdcage/piston encapsulator is fixed in the can and can't be removed for servicing - so you'll be scrubbing off all the buildup by hand with a brush in order to get your piston back in.

View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Engineer:
Originally Posted By Mauser1:
Barrel was cut at 16.5 then threaded back with the front site remounted. It didn't have a scope when I got it.
He had a great sense of detail and wasn't known for shoddy machine work. He never had a supressor in mind when he did it.
But it sure looked like a easy springboard for me to get started. I didn't know Mr Earp hung around these parts.

I would like to end up with three. 22lr 5.56 and a 9mm for my CZ. I just thought I might be covering the same base twice with the 220/223 bore.
Oh is 600$ a reasonable budget with stamp to get this done? Or not really.
Crappy pic of the CZ I would be looking to do next.

Still no guarantee that the threading was done concentric to the bore. The quick and cheap way to do it is to sight down the bore with the suppressor mounted. Next step would be to use an appropriate sized drill rod and third would be to actually measure it.

If you want to do double duty, do it on your pistol caliber can. You can get a .45 can and run .40 and 9mm out of it. Most fullsize .45 cans are the same diameter as their 9mm counterparts and only an inch longer and performance losses aren't too noticeable.

$600... for rimfire can, sure. For anything else, probably not. $200 itself will be the cost of the stamp. If you order from a place like Silencer Shop, your local transfer dealer will charge anywhere from $50-100 for a transfer. So almost half of your budget is going towards taxes and fees.

Personally, I don't recommend the Octane for rimfire. Yes, the baffles are stainless, but the birdcage/piston encapsulator is fixed in the can and can't be removed for servicing - so you'll be scrubbing off all the buildup by hand with a brush in order to get your piston back in.



That last bit is news to me. Mine comes apart.
Link Posted: 10/5/2014 7:37:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/5/2014 7:41:29 AM EST by Engineer]
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Originally Posted By vellnueve:


That last bit is news to me. Mine comes apart.
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Originally Posted By vellnueve:
Originally Posted By Engineer:

Personally, I don't recommend the Octane for rimfire. Yes, the baffles are stainless, but the birdcage/piston encapsulator is fixed in the can and can't be removed for servicing - so you'll be scrubbing off all the buildup by hand with a brush in order to get your piston back in.



That last bit is news to me. Mine comes apart.

None of the birdcages on my three Octanes are removable from the main tube and according to Silencerco it's not supposed to:


Link Posted: 10/5/2014 9:13:52 AM EST
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Originally Posted By vellnueve:

That last bit is news to me. Mine comes apart.
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Originally Posted By vellnueve:
Originally Posted By Engineer:
Personally, I don't recommend the Octane for rimfire. Yes, the baffles are stainless, but the birdcage/piston encapsulator is fixed in the can and can't be removed for servicing - so you'll be scrubbing off all the buildup by hand with a brush in order to get your piston back in.

That last bit is news to me. Mine comes apart.

Do we get pictures of that? It's just red locktite so heat will cause it to break loose. Also if the threads were not cleaned well or if the locktite was poorly applied, etc. I, personally, would like to be able to take the encapsulator off.

On another note, I made a fixed barrel spacer from solid tubing that keeps the encapsulator pretty clean.
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