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Posted: 12/23/2008 6:01:43 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/23/2008 6:02:09 AM EST by lmckelvy]
I've got a 1919 No1 Mk III* that my Grandfather left me several years ago. It had been bubba'd –– he used it to hunt with. I drug it out of my gun safe and had a good look at it recently, did a little research. Since the stock is cut down and the bolt is a mismatch (barrel and receiver match, though), it has little or no collector value as far as I've been able to determine. The action is in pretty good shape (PICs) and I got fair groups at 50 yards with the iron sights (I'm not the worlds best shot, so I'm confident the barrel is OK), and even though the bolt is mismatched I can detect no headspace issues.

Since the furniture is butchered already (and I need a deer rifle), I was going to replace it with a synthetic Monte Carlo and add a 'no drill' scope mount to it. I plan to keep the original furniture in case my son wants to restore it to 'military' condition one day.

Has anyone had experience with these conversions? Anything I need to do in terms of bedding when I switch out the stocks? Any advice or help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Mac
Link Posted: 12/23/2008 7:27:16 PM EST
The stock is east to swap out if you can get the buttstock off...

I would just leave it like it is and put the scope mount on it... Your not going to hurt anything leaving that chopped up wood on it...
Link Posted: 12/23/2008 10:36:09 PM EST
You can also buy replacement military surplus stocks online for the Enfield rifles. I'll look around and see if I can find a link. I remember them being about $30. It's likely that you'll also need a nosecap and other minor hardware, though, and I'm not sure how easy those will be to find.

Since the wood is already chopped up, putting a synthetic stock on it won't hurt anything, as long as the metal isn't modified. Because of the design of the Enfield rifle, you'll need a stock specially designed for it. I'm sure someone has made these...you just have to look around. Standard bedding techniques on the forestock should do fine.

Most Enfields either don't have matching serial numbers or the numbers were forced matched during an arsenal rebuild. Matching serial numbers aren't a huge deal with Enfields.

I don't know what your stock looks like, so some of this might not apply. The stock comes in two main pieces: a forestock divided into two upper and one lower pieces, and a butt stock. The trick to removing the butt stock is to remove the buttplate, stick a long-shafted screwdriver up the hole in the rear of the butt, and use it to loosen a large screw that holds the butt stock in place.

Also, if you want to disassembly the bolt completely, you need to buy a special armorer's tool for the No. 1 Mk. IIII. They also sell these online.

I got a crash course on Enfield No 1 Mk III disassembly this weekend while I was checking out and cleaning up two new purchases.

I have to admit that I like hunting with military surplus rifles in their original configuration. I like to pretend that the wild hogs or coyotes are Nazis, Japanese, or whatever other enemy is appropriate. I know it's not quite normal, but it's fun.
Link Posted: 12/24/2008 4:57:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/24/2008 4:58:17 AM EST by lmckelvy]
Thanks guys. The stock I found is designed for the Enfield, but it would certainly be cheaper to leave the old one on. I may just do that instead....

In case anyone else is interested here is the link to the stock:

Synthetic Stock

and scope mount:

Weaver compatible scope mount

These are available from a number of online outlets, such as CTD etc...

I have looked for replacement forestocks and handguards, and they seem to be available in a number of places.
Link Posted: 12/24/2008 5:04:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By RedDevil556:
I got a crash course on Enfield No 1 Mk III disassembly this weekend while I was checking out and cleaning up two new purchases.

I have to admit that I like hunting with military surplus rifles in their original configuration. I like to pretend that the wild hogs or coyotes are Nazis, Japanese, or whatever other enemy is appropriate*. I know it's not quite normal, but it's fun.


I do plan a trial-by-fire disassemble and clean up, so that info about the armorers tool is useful.

*Warn me if you plan to take a K98 out into the woods....
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