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Posted: 6/30/2015 1:14:26 AM EDT
Hi everyone i got myself an early birthday gift this year its a maltby 1943 made no4 mk1 been wanting to add an Enfield to the collection for awhile now..
How does everyone like theres?? Anyone else notice the strange length of pull on it?? or am i spoiled by my garand??
What does everyone shoot through theirs?? What about the reloading crowd what are you guys making for yours  and/or tips and tricks you have??

I want to replace the L style flip sight with a micrometer one does anyone know where to find one at for a decent price??   What are everyones thoughts on the micrometer??
Anyone have a soource for replacement barrels for these or those dried up??
sorry for so many questions just don't know to much on these old gals. i'll post some pics when I get a chance.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 8:31:29 AM EDT
[#1]
My 1942 Maltby has a 2 stage trigger.  I have a scope with a mount that doesn't require any modifications to the rifle.  The rifle is sighted in with Remington Core-Lok softpoint ammo but I still use surplus ammo for target practice.  My 2nd Malby is very similar and just as accurate (both have the micrometer sight).  These are great rifles.  I use the scoped Enfield as my primary hunting rifle.  I have never failed to get a deer with this rifle (at distances up to 300 yards).
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 10:00:56 AM EDT
[#2]
Congrats on your new Enfield!

I've always said that if I had to pick a bolt action rifle to take into combat, it would be the No.4 Mk.I, hands down.

Length of pull can vary, since there were different length buttstocks made for them.

Since good surplus ammo is getting scarce, I reload almost everything for mine, nowadays. Prvi ammo isn't too bad, but their brass is tops for this caliber, IMO. There are three bullets that I prefer and some of mine show a preference for one over the other. They are; Hornady .312" 174gr BTHP, Sierra .311" 174gr Match King and the Sierra .311" 180gr soft point. I usually use Varget or IMR 4064 for powder.

While I like the micrometer sights, I've also become accustomed to the L type flip sight and have no problem using it, so long as my loads match the service load/calibration fairly close, but it may depend on the type of shooting you do, too.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 2:29:43 PM EDT
[#3]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Congrats on your new Enfield!

I've always said that if I had to pick a bolt action rifle to take into combat, it would be the No.4 Mk.I, hands down.

Length of pull can vary, since there were different length buttstocks made for them.

Since good surplus ammo is getting scarce, I reload almost everything for mine, nowadays. Prvi ammo isn't too bad, but their brass is tops for this caliber, IMO. There are three bullets that I prefer and some of mine show a preference for one over the other. They are; Hornady .312" 174gr BTHP, Sierra .311" 174gr Match King and the Sierra .311" 180gr soft point. I usually use Varget or IMR 4064 for powder.

While I like the micrometer sights, I've also become accustomed to the L type flip sight and have no problem using it, so long as my loads match the service load/calibration fairly close, but it may depend on the type of shooting you do, too.
View Quote


Correct: the LOP depended on which of the 4 or 5 different butt stocks were fitted.  Originally, the plan was to fit each individual rifle to the size of the soldier - just like different size uniforms.

The idea behind this was speed and accuracy; the right length buttstock theoretically allowed the soldier to shoot faster.  The other was fast accuracy; the Brits have always been shotgunners and the way British builders "sight in" a shotgun is to fit the gun to the shooter (sort of like a tailor fits a suit).

OP, the chambers on these are cut generously to improve trench/battlefield reliability.  Brass stretches a lot as a result and you probably won't get as many loads out it.  The rear-locking action makes the wear on brass even worse.  As you'll see from the ammo, it started life long ago as a black powder, then a cordite, round.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 3:27:34 PM EDT
[#4]
yep,  Bantam, S Short, N Normal, L Long, XL Extra long.

I like the S stock on the No4mk1.  I have an arctic stock which is pretty much a bantam on my SLR.

Look on the wrist of your stock, you may have a few letters and numbers with a larger single letter or pair for XL.
Link Posted: 7/4/2015 7:17:32 PM EDT
[#5]
My No4 mk1/2 shoots Barnes 150 grain TSX bullet very straight.  These things have a lot of bore friction, and so avoid maximum powder charges for the 150 grain lead data.

Copper monoliths run the pressure right up there, compared with the older, cup and core lead bullets.

.303 can take to cast lead bullets fantastically well.
Link Posted: 7/4/2015 8:06:58 PM EDT
[#6]
Wartime Enfields can be a PITA to reload for because of the varying chambers
and head spacing (hey, there was a war on ya know...who cares about reloading !)
I think you might want to neck size and keep that ammo for that particular rifle.
Also use a hooked piece of wire (coat hanger wire works good) and probe the
inside cases for cracks and weak spots.

Wire method.
Link Posted: 7/4/2015 9:12:15 PM EDT
[#7]
I would also agree with IHC53's comments, above. I will also add that I've had a couple of Enfields with pitted chambers, so watch out for that. Also, some of them have chambers that aren't perfectly concentric. So, if you do neck size your brass, it may not really be of any advantage because you won't be able to line the case up to the exact position in which it was previously fired. So, check your brass and chamber carefully. Yes, they are hard on brass, but I've had pretty good luck with Prvi  brass in several rifles. I full size every time and have at least five loads on some of my brass. Just keep an eye out for the early signs of head separation. I've found that you can usually see it on the load before it happens, if you're looking out for it. I've also had decent luck with old Winchester, Remington and Imperial brass, although they don't usually last as long as Prvi.
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