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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 4/28/2003 7:44:37 AM EDT
After a few of weeks of neglect, I decided to thoroughly clean my M1.

I used some Shooter's Choice Copper Remover in the bore. Geez, it must have taken 20 patches soaked with this stuff to get all of the blue out. Same thing with a Mauser. (No brass tools were used during cleaning.)

Do you guys bother getting the copper out? I realize that copper is somewhat self-limiting, but does it have an effect on accuracy or function? Is copper removal more critical with shooting corrosive ammo, as in the Mauser?
Link Posted: 4/28/2003 11:56:21 AM EDT
I normally do if I buy one that has been used but I do not go overboard with it. Mainly as a gauge to see what kind of shape the bore is in. Excess copper fouling can hide any pitting the barrel may have. On the other hand those little pits being filled in by a small amount of copper could help out the accuracy I suppose. I use a liberal amount of Windex with ammonia after I shoot corrosive ammo. So no, I do not worry about getting the barrel spotless after shooting corrosive ammo.

I have a Yugo M48 which I thought at the time of purchase had a barrel on it in excellent shape. After many many patches of Hoppe's Benchrest I discovered the barrel wasn't in near as good as shape as I originally thought. It's still a shooter though, when my shoulder will tolerate it
Link Posted: 4/28/2003 12:00:00 PM EDT
Removing copper "fouling" is only needed if you're shooting corrosive ammunition -- and it's vital. Corrosive ammunition is the source of all the "clean that day and for several days afterwards" drill.

Essentially the copper fouling will plate over the corrosive salts. Barrel will look fine, the salts are eating the steel under the copper.

Best solution is to avoid the use of corrosive ammunition altogether. If you shoot it, though, you'll need to be careful about getting it out.

If you shoot non-corrosive ammunition removing the copper isn't important unless this is a benchrest rifle. Overcleaning has probably ruined more barrels than have been shot out. Since the M1 has to be cleaned from the muzzle don't worry about copper fouling until you see your accuracy drop off.

-- Chuck
Link Posted: 4/28/2003 12:37:18 PM EDT
Only on my "target" type rifles. Everyday shooters like SKSs, AKs, Mausers, Enfields are not worth the trouble. Only heavy barrel accuracy type rifles make the de-coppering list for me.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 3:58:53 PM EDT
I have some copper solvent I use on my garand because I heard the chemicals in it are good for neutralizing the salts in corrosive ammo, and due to the rust that appeared after the first time I shot it I think the "non-corrosive" surplus ammo I picked up is actually corrosive
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 10:06:22 PM EDT
Water washes the corrosive salt out of the barrel.

I shoot corrosive ammo in bolt guns. It is easy to clean.

I'm reluctant to shoot it in gas guns though. Harder to clean.

Dennis Jenkins


Originally Posted By sharky30:
I have some copper solvent I use on my garand because I heard the chemicals in it are good for neutralizing the salts in corrosive ammo, and due to the rust that appeared after the first time I shot it I think the "non-corrosive" surplus ammo I picked up is actually corrosive

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