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Posted: 7/18/2008 5:02:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 5:05:42 PM EDT by JNesbitt82]
Which one is better and why?
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 6:09:49 PM EDT
550 is better. I hate auto indexing.

Although, I wish the 550 had a 5 hole toolhead and shellplate.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 6:37:36 PM EDT
depends on what you want to use it/them for.
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 8:02:17 PM EDT
I have the 550 and really like it because I can use it like a S/S when I am working on a match load for my Savage
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 8:32:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/18/2008 8:49:08 PM EDT
Comparison chart here thanks to COSteve www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=6&f=42&t=248741
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 4:41:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:
I don't think there is a real firm answer to this. Both work exceptionally well, and are easy to learn. The 650 (with case feeder) with load MUCH faster--especially for pistol calibers. The 550B is favored for rifle calibers, as they must be loaded in two steps (case prep and actual loading).

OTOH, many use the XL650 with a second toolhead--and the case feeder--and get great speed for rifle case prep. This involves using the Dillon Rapid Trim after the size die.

Both are great presses.

I had a 550B for 4½ yrs and 70K+ rounds of both pistol and rifle cases. I flat works great! I had a second toolhead for my .223 for case prep (decapping/resizing die) and one for actual reloading.

I got a 650 almost 2 years ago with the casefeeder so that I could use it for pistol and rifle calibers. The casefeeder is especially good for rifle because you process the brass twice and the casefeeder speeds that up tremendously. Recently I added a Dillon trimmer to my .223 case prep toolhead and now case prep is a breeze.

BTW, you can also use the 650 as a single stage by feeding only one case into it and then processing it completely, however, once you learn how to work your 650 there is little reason to slow yourself down for that.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:44:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 5:48:39 AM EDT by rn22723]
If I was loading handgun and rifle, hands down get 550 and then buy a Giraud trimmer!
This will keep you within budget, and it affords you a good way to process your rifle brass! The Giruad as no peers! It is a better trimmer then the Dillon! The only way the dillon trimmer shines is if you had a super 1050.The 550 without a case feeder is much more easily adaptable to psuedo single stage use!


If I was loading strictly handgun (straight walled) get the 650 and casefeeder!



Link Posted: 7/19/2008 8:23:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By rn22723:
If I was loading handgun and rifle, hands down get 550 and then buy a Giraud trimmer!
This will keep you within budget, and it affords you a good way to process your rifle brass! The Giruad as no peers! It is a better trimmer then the Dillon! The only way the dillon trimmer shines is if you had a super 1050.The 550 without a case feeder is much more easily adaptable to psuedo single stage use!

If I was loading strictly handgun (straight walled) get the 650 and casefeeder!

I couldn't disagree more. The Dillon Trimmer does a great job with no burs at all. I don't chamfer the inside as I shoot boat tail bullets and I don't need to do it to seat the bullets with ease. My 55 and 69grn loads are very accurate at 300yds in my Wylde chambered RRA even without an inside chamfer.

In fact, the only real need for a chamfered inside neck is if you are a bullseye shooter where you weigh everything to get the max consistency. They don't use a powered trimmer but rather do everything by hand.

I agree that the Giraud trimmer is a great trimmer, however, it requires that you hand trim every case which adds a full cycle of handling each piece of brass again. Try doing 1,000 cases on one and you'll find that your fingers are sore.

Not so with my Dillon Trimmer, I just lube the cases, dump them in the casefeeder, and cycle the press. Out comes decapped, resized, and trimmed cases (only if they need it) without me having to do the extra step. Processing 1,000 pieces of brass is easy in just 1 hour and they are decapped, resized, and trimmed because all you do is pull the handle.

Even if the Giraud was the same price as the Dillon (its $375 vs the Dillon at $210 + $42 = $252), I'd still pass on the Giraud as it requires that extra handling and takes up additional space on my bench. The extra cost of a Giraud ($123) will pay the difference between the 550 vs 650 with an additional $13 you can put towards your casefeeder. BTW, Replacement carbide blades for the Giraud are $30 while Dillons are only $15.

Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:46:39 AM EDT
The Giraud trimmer has some plusses:

- it's portable, you're not tied to a reloading press, extra dedicated tool head
- you don't need a vacuum attached to it to suck away the shavings
- trimming 762x39 requires a whole new Dillon trimmer vs just a Giraud case holder
- Giraud can be adapted to a meplat trimmer
- Giraud trimmer chamfers the inside of the case mouth for those that dont use boat tail bullets
- the sized case mouth doesn't have to be expanded afterwards as with the Dillon trimmer since the Dillon trimmer doesn't use an expander ball

If .223 was the only rifle caliber someone was reloading for and had a Dilon progressive press already, the Dillon trimmer is a great option as well



Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:26:11 AM EDT
If you are looking to load as many as fast as you can (not so much worrying about accuracy but plinking rounds) than the 650 is amazing. I have the 550B and i love it because i can use it as a single stage press to make my .308 match loads. They have performed very well for me.
JP
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:33:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 10:33:48 AM EDT by Buck_Naked]
Another negative (at least for me) on the Dillon Trimmer is no trim die for 6.8 SPC...
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 4:53:21 PM EDT
Thanks for all of the great input! Everyone has thier own opinion. I talked to a gentleman today who said the Hornady Lock n Load AP was better than the Dillon's. I can spend up to $500 for the press not including accessories or dies. I also kind of like the 1,000 round bonus. The only reason I was looking at the XL 650 is for the auto indexing. Whats your opinion on the Hornady Lock N Load? Is it better than the Dillon or worse? I will start off reloading .223 for my AR and will be moving to other rifle and and pistol calibers. I am doing this to save money, increase shooting skills, and just because I enjoy reloading.

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Link Posted: 7/19/2008 4:55:34 PM EDT
Oops! Not sure why there is so much dead space in the response above. Sorry
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 5:11:25 PM EDT
I have a 650 - I think you can remove the index camming block from the press frame on a 650 with an allen wrench if you want to manually index. Better to have it and not need it...

I have 1 toolhead with a universal decapper- pour the brass through, then clean using ceramic media. 100% clean, in and out.

Second toolhead has Dillon trimmer and a second sizer die located after the Dillon case trimmer. This is to roll form the lip from the brass - and yes the Dillon trimmer leaves very little to begin with.

Brass is fully prepped after this, without having to handle individual pieces.

My third toolhead has the powder drop and seater.

I also use a Lee trimmer in a drill press which works great for odds and ends stuff. It is extremely consistent and independent of headspace.

I will post pictures later after I top off on Pizza...
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