Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
User Panel

Posted: 7/23/2013 11:42:42 PM EST
Ok.... I've got 1000 pieces of 5.56 once fired range brass that are all crimped primers. I'm new to reloading and am excited about getting started, but I dont have a swagging press. Is there another way? Ive heard of using reamers and deburers. Just curious to know what others do.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 12:08:35 AM EST
[#1]
I've had good luck with the Dillon de-swager.  The nice thing about it is no metal is removed, just "rolled" out of the way. Costs about 100 dollars, but comes with both lg. and small primer sizes. I would also recommend the little crow gun works brass trimmer to uniformly trim your cases. These two items have saved me lots of tedious finger-numbing hours of prep.  If its crimped, you KNOW it's only once fired.  Mike.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 1:24:38 AM EST
[#2]
the dillon 600 will win this debate every time, just spend the money once and be done with it
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 2:19:40 AM EST
[#3]
Before I bought the RCBS Benchtop primer pocket swager I used the Hornady primer pocket reamer.

Chuck that bit in a drill and you're good to go.  

The advantage of this bit to some others is that with this one you cannot cut too deep.

Works perfectly, just not as fast and a bit rougher on your fingers than the bench top swagers (IMO).
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 2:25:25 AM EST
[#4]
Thanks Scott, that what I was hoping to hear. I figured once I get them done, I wont have to do them ever again. So being the cheap guy that I am, I was hoping for that type of anwser.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:01:02 AM EST
[#5]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
the dillon 600 will win this debate every time, just spend the money once and be done with it
View Quote


Not really.  I tried it and sold it.

I can go faster on the drill.. without ruining brass.  I know guys like the swager, but it wasn't for me.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:04:44 AM EST
[#6]
from page 3 of this thread: http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_6_42/258520_Read__First___useful_threads_for_answering_questions.html

Tools for removing Primer Crimp, priced low to high. Note: there are other brands and sources for these tools, this is just an outline. They all work fine.

Hand-held Primer Pocket Reamer Tool(the bit from this tool can be chucked into a screw-gun) Small Pocket , Large Pocket @ $10


Single Stage Press Primer Pocket Swager Small and Large Die Set @ $35


Bench Mounted Primer Pocket Swager Bench Mount @ $80


Case Prep Center Prep Center @ $130


High-end Progressive Reloaders 1050 Price varies, @ $1600
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:07:29 AM EST
[#7]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Hand-held Primer Pocket Reamer Tool(the bit from this tool can be chucked into a screw-gun) Small Pocket , Large Pocket @ $10

View Quote



There's a reason the small primer pocker reamer is sold out until September at midway.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:12:51 AM EST
[#8]
I use a lyman primer pocket reamer I chuck it in the drill I can do a hundred in a hour, holding the case in my hand, no need for fancy tools just a drill and a leather glove works fine beside everyone should be cleaning out the primer pockets I do the same with the same set up again no need for fancy tools
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:15:11 AM EST
[#9]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I use a lyman primer pocket reamer I chuck it in the drill I can do a hundred in a hour, holding the case in my hand, no need for fancy tools just a drill and a leather glove works fine beside everyone should be cleaning out the primer pockets I do the same with the same set up again no need for fancy tools
View Quote



A hundred an hour?  You're going to scare people off.  You can remove crimps as fast as you can grab the brass.  I put a drop tote right under the cutter so I can really fly.

And why should people clean primer pockets?  It's nice if they're clean, but I've never seen any data to show it helps ammo quality or accuracy.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:29:56 AM EST
[#10]
This is the RIGHT tool:
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/789334/le-wilson-chamfer-and-deburring-tool-17-to-45-caliber
This GARBAGE that is made by Lee and Lyman can't possibly remove enough material with the staked LC brass.  That staking goes pretty deep.  
You can chuck the shank of the tool I've linked to in a drill, and as others note, that goes pretty fast.
You might waste time and effort with other JUNK, but you'll end up using this.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:32:25 AM EST
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
This is the RIGHT tool:
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/789334/le-wilson-chamfer-and-deburring-tool-17-to-45-caliber
This GARBAGE that is made by Lee and Lyman can't possibly remove enough material with the staked LC brass.  That staking goes pretty deep.  
You can chuck the shank of the tool I've linked to in a drill, and as others note, that goes pretty fast.
You might waste time and effort with other JUNK, but you'll end up using this.
View Quote


My opinion is that is exactly the WRONG tool.

Go too deep and you've ruined the case.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:59:48 AM EST
[#12]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
This is the RIGHT tool:
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/789334/le-wilson-chamfer-and-deburring-tool-17-to-45-caliber
This GARBAGE that is made by Lee and Lyman can't possibly remove enough material with the staked LC brass.  That staking goes pretty deep.  
You can chuck the shank of the tool I've linked to in a drill, and as others note, that goes pretty fast.
You might waste time and effort with other JUNK, but you'll end up using this.
View Quote


I disagree wtih the deep staking.  On many of the LC cases (XM 193), I can prime without removing the crimp at all.  Not across the board though.  I remember the AE223 from 2006 that had LC brass with the strongest case head I've ever seen.

I still have some of that stuff.  I pull it down and load Mk 262 clone ammo for defense ammo.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 6:06:35 AM EST
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
This is the RIGHT tool:
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/789334/le-wilson-chamfer-and-deburring-tool-17-to-45-caliber
This GARBAGE that is made by Lee and Lyman can't possibly remove enough material with the staked LC brass.  That staking goes pretty deep.  
You can chuck the shank of the tool I've linked to in a drill, and as others note, that goes pretty fast.
You might waste time and effort with other JUNK, but you'll end up using this.
View Quote


This is very poor advice.

This is a chamfer and deburr tool. It is to be used after trimming the neck of brass only.

Using this WILL remove too much material resulting in loose primer pockets and unusable brass.

Use the PROPER tool for the job, such as the ones listed in my previous post.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:02:16 AM EST
[#14]
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 12:42:38 PM EST
[#15]
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 12:53:10 PM EST
[#16]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Not really.  I tried it and sold it.

I can go faster on the drill.. without ruining brass.  I know guys like the swager, but it wasn't for me.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
the dillon 600 will win this debate every time, just spend the money once and be done with it


Not really.  I tried it and sold it.

I can go faster on the drill.. without ruining brass.  I know guys like the swager, but it wasn't for me.


Same here got rid of it and kept the Hornady reamer
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 3:35:34 PM EST
[#17]
I call junk for what it is.  In 40 years of reloading, I've become more than a little bit familiar with what works.  I've thrown away a whole bunch of what does not work.
If you disagree about the staked primers, you aren't looking at the ones I mention.  Just today, I was priming cases.  The staked primers that got my usual depth for crimp removal could not be forced to accept a new primer with the RCBS universal tool.
I got my start among the disciples of P.O. Ackley, around Orem, Ut.  According to them, I'm using the RIGHT tool.  I couldn't care less what others say.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 3:48:38 PM EST
[#18]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I call junk for what it is.  In 40 years of reloading, I've become more than a little bit familiar with what works.  I've thrown away a whole bunch of what does not work.
If you disagree about the staked primers, you aren't looking at the ones I mention.  Just today, I was priming cases.  The staked primers that got my usual depth for crimp removal could not be forced to accept a new primer with the RCBS universal tool.
I got my start among the disciples of P.O. Ackley, around Orem, Ut.  According to them, I'm using the RIGHT tool.  I couldn't care less what others say.
View Quote


I wasn't trying to attack you.  Sorry if you took it that way.

I don't think anyone was trying to tell you it could NOT be done with chamfer tool.  It certainly can, and I have used it myself on a few cases.

I just do not think it is the most failsafe method available.  Especially for a new reloader that's never done it before. (which is how / when I tried it)

The Hornady reamer cannot cut too deep, the chamfer tool can. -Infidel- can pick up one or both.

Personally, the swager is the way to go IMO.  It's much faster (for me), and easier on the fingers.  We've seen a couple of folks that disagree with that recommendation as well.  Free country.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 4:30:48 PM EST
[#19]

You're probably right about the swager, altho I've dealt with a bunch of cases that had been swaged and priming was very difficult.  I still cut a small "starter" taper on those.
With the staked primer pockets  I mention, those little hand tools that limit the cut will never get past the "Squaring" of the primer pocket that the staking induces.  You cut a little way into those, and you can see that the pocket is deformed by the staking.  Swaging would probably reform that enough.  I bought a hand tool, made by Lyman (whom I had always trusted) that claimed to be a primer pocket deburring tool.  Egads!  You can't get through 100 pieces of brass with that GARBAGE before you decide that there has got to be a better way.
I vehemently stand by the time tested deburring tool because I came up in a time when just about anything a man may endeavor to do could put him at risk of over doing it.  Try flame cutting titanium, or building high pressure propulsion piping systems.  You use the right tool for the job.  Use it wrong, and you might set the county on fire.  Do it right, and the biggest war ships on earth can go 80+ mph.  There is a huge measure of discernment, skill, and mechanical aptitude involved in reloading.  A man who has been seeing his method work for decades will not be told otherwise.  He'll try to pass his methods on to the kids who are next to try.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 9:34:26 PM EST
[#20]
Buy once cry once, get the swager, thats what i did
An error occurred on the server when processing the URL. Please contact the system administrator.

If you are the system administrator please click here to find out more about this error.