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Posted: 8/10/2011 1:47:12 PM EDT
Does ANYBODY do this on their progressive,in sequence at the same time?Just wondering.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 2:02:43 PM EDT
What calibers?

For pistol, on a 4 or 5 station press, you typically decap/size in station 1, powder/expand in station 2, seat on station 3, and crimp on station 4. On a 5 station press, you can put a powder check die on station 3 and move the seat and crimp stations back one spot.

For rifles, you can't go from range brass to loaded ammo with one trip through the machine.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 2:44:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/10/2011 2:45:57 PM EDT by Fluke]
Whats different about rifle?
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 2:53:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Fluke:
Whats different about rifle?


Generally only if they have the Dillon power trimmer on the press.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 2:55:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Fluke:
Whats different about rifle?

Correct case length is more critical, and they also have lube on them which I like to get off before putting powder in.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 2:55:46 PM EDT
Usually rifle needs two passes because cases may need to be trimmed and/or the primer pockets need to be decrimped.

Cases should be trimmed after sizing so the first pass is lube, decap, size. The sizing die will decap and size at the same time.

Then you need to trim the cases if 1.760" for .223 or longer and if necesary decrimp the primer pocket.

You can do additional primer pocket steps if you want: clean the pocket, uniform it, uniform the primer flash hole.

Then you can finish up by delubing, seating a new primer, dropping powder, seating a projectile, and optionally applying one of three different types of crimps: roll crimp, taper crimp, Lee Factory Crimp Die crimp.

Some people delube the case after it's been loaded, I like to delube it right after it's been sized so I no longer have to handle sticky gooey cases for the rest of the process.

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All that being said, if you're careful on keeping all your brass in known lots, you can trim it to 1.740" the first time around and forever more use the RCBS X die and avoid the trimming process. But once you get new brass into that stream, you're running the risk of loading a round that has a > 1.760" case length.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 3:06:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/10/2011 3:09:58 PM EDT by Fluke]
OK,I should have asked "why would anybody" do this.I know you can but why?I like clean brass and a clean press. I decap all my brass rifle and pistol on a separate press clean,size, trim rifle and reclean before I load.Just wondering. EDTA primer pocket work included Before loading.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 3:27:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/10/2011 6:27:22 PM EDT by ReefRaider]
I have been known to do it this way with brass that's on its last loading. Which for me is its 4th firing. I just polish the lube off of the loaded rnds.

ETA You ask "why would anybody" do this ?

Its much faster
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 5:52:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/10/2011 5:53:40 PM EDT by AssaultRifler]

Originally Posted By Fluke:
OK,I should have asked "why would anybody" do this.I know you can but why?I like clean brass and a clean press. I decap all my brass rifle and pistol on a separate press clean,size, trim rifle and reclean before I load.Just wondering. EDTA primer pocket work included Before loading.

You just fessed up why you process rifle brass in two stages and gave your own answer, which is correct. Rifle brass needs trimming and primer pocket tending to before you load it. Can't do it all in one pass.

Now if you're reloading rifle brass that's already been processed, you can do it in one pass. But then again, the key phrase is "rifle brass that's already been processed". That usually means you. That means separate steps as described above.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 6:27:57 PM EDT
On my 650 I size/trim in the RL1200 on the first pass. Tumble to remove lube, and then neck size decap/prime on second pass.

This prevents media from getting in the primer pockets.
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