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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 10/6/2007 5:38:50 PM EST
I've tried using wood bleach on a stock for the first time and I'm pretty happy with its performance but while it took alot of the iron/oil stains out of the wood, it also stripped out all its natural color. I've put several coats of tru-oil on it hoping it would bring a little color back to it and it would look nice. Its just too white though. Do I need to sand it down and start again or can I mix a little bit of stain in with the tru-oil as I rub it on?
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:58:10 PM EST
Before you do anything else I'd recommend finding some type of stock refinishing forum.

Dennis Jenkins


Originally Posted By Soybomb:
I've tried using wood bleach on a stock for the first time and I'm pretty happy with its performance but while it took alot of the iron/oil stains out of the wood, it also stripped out all its natural color. I've put several coats of tru-oil on it hoping it would bring a little color back to it and it would look nice. Its just too white though. Do I need to sand it down and start again or can I mix a little bit of stain in with the tru-oil as I rub it on?
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 3:41:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 4:20:17 PM EST
AeroE the question really is though what happens when you put the tru oil on and the stock isn't quite the right color yet.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 4:45:10 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 7:08:42 AM EST
When I first started messing with guns, I used some Tru Oil. I regret it. Horribly ugly material. Try to use what was orignial to the firearm. I am a fan of BLO as a base and Tung Oil as the final coat.

Poly urethane is also just plain evil.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 8:36:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2007 5:22:20 PM EST by AeroE]
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 4:04:53 PM EST
Makers of tru-oil stated use stain first, then tru-oil.

If you are refinishing anything military the tru-oil will look WAY too shiny.

I refinished a 1898 krag that I stripped shellac off of with linseed oil. It came out looking very nice. It needed another coat or two, but I traded it for my M1a before I could do that ;)

J
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 7:14:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2007 7:18:43 PM EST by dogrunner]
I have had superb results with light and lightly figured wood using Dixie Gun Works chromium trioxide as a base stock stain. It is easily adjusted for relative darkness by a vinegar wash and on light woods imparts a chestnut like stain.

Did a very light Birch mid '60s M/70 stock for a friend and then tru oiled it to a high gloss at his request....The darkness of the stain was easily managed and I deliberately left the checkering I re-cut from the imbossed pattern a darker hue....Surprised myself with the job....Worth a try on a Birch Mosin.

You can adjust the Tru-Oil shine to your liking by doing a heavy rubdown with rotten stone.....lightly grease a chunk of felt about two inches square and then powder it with that abrasive..........do it till it suits you. The nice thing about that sort of a final finish is its sealing capability for the wood....as someone said, natural oils just don't accomplish that and generally look like hell less constant maintance.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 7:35:14 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 6:55:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/9/2007 6:57:41 AM EST by dogrunner]
Yeah, I heard that too. That 70 I did is now about 8 years into it's new look and still has the same tone as when it was just finished. I suspect the greening effect is the failure to "kill" the acid reaction.....You HAVE to do the vinegar wash thoroughly.

I also did a Pedersoli long rifle stocked with European walnut with super results and I have also noted no greening with it either.....that ones about 10 years into its re do....The real plus was the highlight it brought to the figure.

Do as you will, but it worked for me on two occasions.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 8:33:02 AM EST
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