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Posted: 3/14/2011 1:33:44 PM EST
I've never owned a garand before, but I'd love to add one to my collection. The special grade for about $1000 seems to involve a new stock, barrel, and refinished metalwork on everything else. Is every part matching? Or does it not matter seeing as the barrel and stock won't?

From what I can tell, the correct grade is $100 more but for decently great condition original parts. Parts are matching and not refinished, right?

Which would you guys grab? And yes... I'd love to own both, but I can only afford one as I'm also eyeing some m1 carbines...
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 1:39:03 PM EST
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 2:04:15 PM EST
Originally Posted By bigbore:
for a shooter Id get the service grade, for a collector I'd get a correct grade. Nothing really "matches" on an M1. A correct grade will have all the "correct" parts for the SN range.


Can you please elaborate more on the nonmatching but "correct" parts? And I take it you don't care for the special grades?
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 2:17:38 PM EST
Originally Posted By Johnson184:
Originally Posted By bigbore:
for a shooter Id get the service grade, for a collector I'd get a correct grade. Nothing really "matches" on an M1. A correct grade will have all the "correct" parts for the SN range.


Can you please elaborate more on the nonmatching but "correct" parts? And I take it you don't care for the special grades?


I will try, what Bigbore means, most M1 Garands have been rebuilt at least once in it's lifetime. When this was done, parts were not kept together for the gun which they came from. The arsenal would inspect all parts and reassemble the M1 within spec. When this was done, a complete M1 would have a mixture of mfg, and dated parts. A correct grade, has all of the parts "correct" for the date/mfg. of the serial number on the receiver, each part has a drawing number, which can be dated. I hope this helps...surely someone else can/will make this clearer if needed.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 2:33:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 2:34:31 PM EST by bigbore]
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 2:48:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 2:50:33 PM EST by Bladeswitcher]
Service grade. You'll get a nice one with a good barrel. No need to go any higher if you're interested in a gun to shoot.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 2:49:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 2:51:46 PM EST by Bladeswitcher]
BTW, don't be turned off by mixmasters. That's part of the history of a military rifle. The only time a USGI rifle is really "correct" is before it goes into service. What's the fun of that?
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 2:59:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:
The only time a USGI rifle is really "correct" is before it goes into service. What's the fun of that?


Not true, correct Garands are not rare, I have 5 of them.
You may be talking about Original Garands which I still dont agree with. While few and far between there are Original Garands around you just dont see them everyday

Link Posted: 3/14/2011 3:11:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By M1G:
Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:
The only time a USGI rifle is really "correct" is before it goes into service. What's the fun of that?


Not true, correct Garands are not rare, I have 5 of them.
You may be talking about Original Garands which I still dont agree with. While few and far between there are Original Garands around you just dont see them everyday




Well, I won't argue with you, since you own five "correct" Garands. But, my point was that there isn't anything wrong with a rifle with mismatched parts. That's what the military did and it's part of the history of the rifle. That adds character, IMO.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 3:17:27 PM EST
I agree, I have more mixmasters than corrects and enjoy them just as much
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 4:22:35 PM EST
I like the postwar rebuilds 46-49 are my favorite.Postwar 60s rebuilds are some of my most accurate m1s.They had plenty of time to make barrels no rush .I have a letter kenny rebuild my favorite rifle and most accurate.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 4:45:39 PM EST
Add the 100 dollars and get the correct grade. It will have all USGI parts. All the parts will be from the same manufacturer(ie HRA or Springfield Armory,the government one) with the correct part numbers for when the rifle was made.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 10:11:08 PM EST
I think it really depends on what you plan to do with it. The CMP Special has a new commercial barrel, a mix of other parts, and the metal has been reparkerized. It looks and feels like a brand new 60 year old rifle. If you plan to do a lot of shooting, especially in service rifle matches, this is the best choice since you are starting with a new barrel which I think is a cut above GI barrels in accuracy. At least that's my experience. The correct grade, as previously described, has all parts that were correct for the date of manufacture of the receiver. You are paying a premium for having "correct" parts. Do you really want to do a lot of shooting with it? I wouldn't. If I wanted a rifle for frequent or occasional non-match shooting I'd get a service grade. Quite a bit less expensive and a lot of fun to shoot.

I have a CMP Special, a WWII rifle purchased thru the DCM many years ago that is a mixmaster in excellent condition, and a post Korea vintage service grade that was delivered last week. The Special is the primary shooter since it is the most accurate. The new one will also become a shooter. It has an ME of 1 and TE of 2 so there is a lot of barrel left. The rest of the metal is in excellent condition but the stock is a new manufacture birch, not too desirable since it isn't GI, but it is functional. THe WWII rifle sits in the safe simply because of it's condition and the fact that it is a WWII rifle. I thought seriously about getting a "correct grade" when I ordered the latest service grade but couldn't justify the added cost over the service grade for a rifle that I wouldn't want to shoot.

Just my opinion. Feel free to disagree.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 12:10:10 PM EST
Get the $900 Service Special grade or whatever it is called. Collector grade like new metal, in an aftermarket wood stock.
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 2:19:41 PM EST
IMHO both rifles can be shot without guilt, but I'd get the "Correct" for resale value alone.

My SA Correct I received a couple weeks ago, I believe to be almost unused. It has no evidence of ever being fired. No brass marks on the bolt, and no wear marks on the receiver. A couple dings on the wood from being shipped/stored. Just enough "damage" to warrant a range trip .
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 3:12:03 PM EST
Lotta differing opinions so far!!.

I just got a HRA Service Grade about 2 months ago. Its a mixmaster. Mostly HRA parts , trigger is SA, bolt is May 41 !!! SA .

I got whats derogatorily termed the Orange birch stock. I have no problems with people liking the correct grades for there.........matching parts. But any of the Garands you will get will have been rebuilt at some time or another. Even the correct grades have been rebuilt and the parts, while correct in approximate age, and manufacturer , are probably NOT original to the rifle.

Or 60 years shit breaks . More than likely someone at CMP has parts categorized my year manufactured/manufacturer, and puts them together to make a "correct" grade rifle.

Only difference with mine is IMHO, eahc part may have its own story to tell , such as the May 41 bolt.

To each his own. But I used the extra money to buy alot of ammo as Im gonna shoot the heck out of it . As said before , I dont know if I would want to do that with a "correct"
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 3:19:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By dsteelman:
Lotta differing opinions so far!!.

I just got a HRA Service Grade about 2 months ago. Its a mixmaster. Mostly HRA parts , trigger is SA, bolt is May 41 !!! SA .

I got whats derogatorily termed the Orange birch stock. I have no problems with people liking the correct grades for there.........matching parts. But any of the Garands you will get will have been rebuilt at some time or another. Even the correct grades have been rebuilt and the parts, while correct in approximate age, and manufacturer , are probably NOT original to the rifle.

Or 60 years shit breaks . More than likely someone at CMP has parts categorized my year manufactured/manufacturer, and puts them together to make a "correct" grade rifle.

Only difference with mine is IMHO, eahc part may have its own story to tell , such as the May 41 bolt.

To each his own. But I used the extra money to buy alot of ammo as Im gonna shoot the heck out of it . As said before , I dont know if I would want to do that with a "correct"



While CGs were "corrected" in the past, many Correct Grades going out these days are as they left the factory (Greek Airforce returns). Orest has said they don't clean or touch the Correct Grades these days. Most are shipped as received.

The "orange" birch can look pretty nice with some TLC though .
Link Posted: 3/15/2011 9:14:47 PM EST
Originally Posted By Jimi:
I like the postwar rebuilds 46-49 are my favorite.Postwar 60s rebuilds are some of my most accurate m1s.They had plenty of time to make barrels no rush .I have a letter kenny rebuild my favorite rifle and most accurate.


Interesting. How can you tell when they were rebuilt?
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 1:56:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/16/2011 1:57:28 AM EST by bigbore]
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 6:43:26 AM EST
I went with a Special and have never regretted it. It's basically a new rifle and I love mine.
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