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Posted: 11/12/2008 5:03:01 PM EDT
I have a Browning "Light Twelve" 12-ga shotgun that was left to me when my grandfather passed away a few years back.  This was given to him as a wedding present by my grandmother in or just before 1950.

My grandfather bird hunted with it (quail and pheasant) and the trigger is worn nice and smooth.  I'd say its had a few shells cycled through it over the last 58+ years.

Does anyone know much about these Brownings?

Thanks in advance!


Link Posted: 11/19/2008 11:30:59 AM EDT
I have one from the 60's that I inherited from my grandfather as well.  They are great guns, and one of JMB's favorite creations.  My grandfather put it through it's paces, and I have as well, since I received it about 12 years ago.  They are very hard to wear out, and rarely need cleaning.  They are much tougher and less picky on ammo than the more modern gas auto shotguns.
Link Posted: 11/19/2008 11:50:52 AM EDT
I too have a circa 60's light twelve from my grandfather.  Great gun.  I use it for squirel and some clays every now and again.  I would say I put easily 500+ rounds down the tube and may actually be closer to 750.  I have some rust spots that I am debating on what to do with, but all in all a very solid gun.  I found a gunsmith on Browning's site that works on these guns and can probably refinish, but I am unsure if that's what I want to do.

As for info, Browning's website has quite a bit of information on this gun.  I would suggest looking there and you will see you have inherited a very nice gun.

The only thing that caught me at the beginning is having to switch out a ring on the magazine tube for firing light and heavy loads.  Once that is understood, you can shoot just about anything.  There should be a description on this inside the wooden fore end telling you how to position it for either load.
Link Posted: 11/20/2008 1:09:22 PM EDT
Yes, remember to switch those rings for different loads.  Also remember to hold on to that barrel when you take off the end cap.  It is a spring operated gun.
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