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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 9/14/2010 6:08:38 PM EDT
Gentlemen, another noob question for you. I was resizing some 300 win brass today, and noticed a wavy appearence between the rim of the shoulder and the neck. Is this normal or is it a problem? Also on a side note, i know a guy that has lead diving wieghts to get rid of, can they be used to cast bullets with?
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 6:10:55 PM EDT
too much lube
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 6:11:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 6:26:58 PM EDT
The sizing die is brand new, first time i used it. so are these cases like this ruined, or can i load them? What would be a better way to lube them than using the pad?
thanks
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 6:47:52 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/14/2010 9:22:46 PM EDT
The lead diving weights can be used to cast bullets, but view them as mystery alloy. You may need to add tin or antimony to get a decent bullet from them.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 8:35:15 AM EDT
Why does getting lube on the shoulder make those dents? That makes no sense to me.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 9:38:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 951bulldog:
Why does getting lube on the shoulder make those dents? That makes no sense to me.


The lube gets trapped between the neck and body and has nowhere else to go so it makes a hydraulic dent.

Link Posted: 9/15/2010 10:26:37 AM EDT
i thought that a hole in the die body allowed the pressure to escape? It looks like there is a hole in he hew dies that would do that? Just a quess of course, and it obviously didnt help me any.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 10:49:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/15/2010 10:50:00 AM EDT by DirtyDrew]
Originally Posted By Finley:
i thought that a hole in the die body allowed the pressure to escape? It looks like there is a hole in he hew dies that would do that? Just a quess of course, and it obviously didnt help me any.


that is for air, not liquid.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 10:55:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/15/2010 11:13:33 AM EDT by AssaultRifler]
.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 11:02:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/15/2010 11:08:47 AM EDT by dp29]
IF, there is no vent hole between the upper part of the die that sizes the case neck & the part of the die that sizes the upper part of the case just below the case shoulder, the excess lube cannot escape. The lube, being a liquid, is put under great pressure when trapped between the die & case. The liquid will not reduce in volume
as pressure is put on it. The case compresses/reduces. That is how the dents on the case shoulder got there. LIGHTLY lube the case neck & body. NOT the case shoulder.
Spray lubes on the case shoulder can & do cause case dents. If there is a hole in the sizer die, assure it is not plugged.
If the die is adjusted up a bit, there will be somewhat less compression in the shoulder area. Having head spacing set correctly is needed. Raising the die might increase head spacing too much. Perhaps the foregoing helps. Let us know how you resolve that issue.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 5:25:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
Case are not ruined. When you shoot them the dents will disappear. Clean your new dies. Q tip and alcohol.

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/How%20To/P8030260.jpg
The best, easiest and fastest is spray lube from Midway or Dillon.

Put clean tumbled cases in box. Shake box and tilt so about half of the cases are neck up.

Shake up lube and spray twice.

Shake box again, 2 more sprays. Done. The lube gets on the necks, but is thin, and no neck dents.

Wait a minute for the lube to dry (alcohol to evaporate) and start sizing.

After sizing, clean off lube by tumbling in plain corn cob.

If you don't have a tumbler yet, you can use a clean rag to wipe cases clean in either step.



^^This and problem solved or use Imperial sizing wax.

Link Posted: 9/15/2010 7:20:17 PM EDT
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