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Posted: 1/3/2012 10:10:13 AM EDT
I have been using a Lee Safety Powder Measure but I do not trust it as I will weigh the same load multiple times and the scale will be all over the place. I made sure the beam is moving freely and everything but still not consistant. I want to get a better beam scale but looking on Midway it seems that there is no clear winner based on the ratings. I am leaning towards the RCBS 505 but it got several one star ratings. Are these low ratings just par for the course or is there some inherent issues with the scale? Is there an 'old standby' beam scale that has continued to be produced as a performer over the years?
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 10:25:00 AM EDT
IIRC, that RCBS 505 is pretty tried and true. I have two and loaned one to a buddy. Pretty accurate for me.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 11:47:14 AM EDT
I've got an old 505 that my dad purchased back in the 80's, and a Lee Safety Scale of unknown vintage (old) that was given to me by a cousin. Both of them measure to within a 1/10th grain of each other (probably less than 1/10 actually). Without question the Lee is a LOT more clunky, and less dampened, but it is accurate.

The Lee should be accurate, and if you find it isn't accurate I would call Lee and try to figure out where the problem is because it should work just fine. The 505 is a nicer working scale however and will make for a nice upgrade. The only problem I ever had with mine is that it sat in dad's garage for about 10 years unused and it got a teeny tiny spec or two of rust on the fulcrum. Nearly pulled hair out on that one until I looked really close under some good light.

Some suggestions for either a Lee or a 505:

1) Don't use when the heat, AC, or fan is running. I don't know whether it is air movement or change in temp, but whatever it is the things don't work as well.

2) Zero it, and make absolute sure you don't move it or bump it. I believe I've seen some pictures of the setup Dryflash (??) uses as a solid mount for the scale that seems like a great idea, but really as long as you are REALLY careful not to move it you should be OK.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 12:03:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/3/2012 2:43:28 PM EDT by GVShooter]
Ok, I am going to see if the local shop has a 505. The lee gets moved a bit, since it has three legs sometimes it get tipped when dampening the beam. Do you all have a dedicated place for your scales where it never moves?

eta: I've zeroed the Lee, loaded some rounds and then checked the zero again and it was off, so then I rezeroed it. Makes me nervous about the cartridges loaded with the first "zero". Also I have been weighing a charge then tapping the beam so it has to dampen again to see if it lands on the same spot, many times it will not stop in the same spot.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 12:11:57 PM EDT
When I first started, I bought a LEE Anniversary kit. My reloading quickly came to a halt when I ran into the same problem you are having. I almost have the heart of mind to say that any scale will do you better than that Lee junk, but I don't know that for sure. I have also heard some good things about the 5-0-5, and you definitely can't go wrong with a Dillon one. With that being said, the good 5-0-5s may have been non-currently produced ones. Maybe that is why they are getting a bad rap now.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 1:36:34 PM EDT
Alright, got a RCBS 505, RCBS Powder Trickler, and Lee dippers. I'll try them out tonight.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 1:42:51 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 2:35:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
Originally Posted By GVShooter:
I have been using a Lee Safety Powder Measure but I do not trust it as I will weigh the same load multiple times and the scale will be all over the place. I made sure the beam is moving freely and everything but still not consistant. I want to get a better beam scale but looking on Midway it seems that there is no clear winner based on the ratings. I am leaning towards the RCBS 505 but it got several one star ratings. Are these low ratings just par for the course or is there some inherent issues with the scale? Is there an 'old standby' beam scale that has continued to be produced as a performer over the years?


The RCBS 505 scale is high quality.

Not the same can be said about reviews and reviewers at the retailers.

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/Tools/P1170697.jpg

I have been using a 505 since the late 70's.


I dig your set up. Is that portable or is it stationary?
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 5:55:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 6:33:54 PM EDT
Good choice on the 5-0-5. They are made by Ohaus as most of the beam scales marketed for reloading are. Buy a set of check weights so you can verify the scale and sleep well.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 6:43:36 PM EDT
what is the difference between the 505 and the 502? besides a few grains of capacity?

personally, I have had the zero drift on my Lee scale, but its been over a long period of time. during a relaoding session, the only issue I have is when using it as a verification and the setting moving. either bumping the veneer scale.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 7:58:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/3/2012 8:13:27 PM EDT by MagnusM4]
The Dillon Eliminator scale is also a good scale if anyone else is looking for a balance beam scale, very comparable to the 505. It is a 3 poise just the like RCBS 505, has an aluminum base and it only costs about $55. I couldn't be happier with mine.
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 8:05:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 7:10:48 PM EDT by dryflash3]
Link Posted: 1/3/2012 8:18:18 PM EDT
what no love for the 1010 now sold by RCBS but I think still made by ohaus. I have an original grey ohaus 1010 and it is dead on once calibrated to zero with the pan.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 5:19:21 AM EDT
My scale that came with my anniversary kit kinda makes me nervous as well.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 6:08:54 AM EDT
I found the Lee to be accurate, but the poor damping made it a pain to use. I replaced it with a Lyman 500 and have been very satisfied. The Lee and the Lyman were equally accurate.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 6:54:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/Bench/IMG_0314-1.jpg

Bolted solid to my shelf unit, at eye level.

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/Tools/P1170696.jpg

Base without scale or trickler. Just a couple of pieces of wood screwed down in the right places.



Very nice. I think I will make a base like that and put it on a wall mounted shelf. Mine won't be as purty though.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 10:07:21 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:35:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/Bench/IMG_0314-1.jpg

Bolted solid to my shelf unit, at eye level.

http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/Tools/P1170696.jpg

Base without scale or trickler. Just a couple of pieces of wood screwed down in the right places.



You make the setup yourself? Woodworking . . . I do some . . . that looks damned nice.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 1:41:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 4:27:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 7:12:17 PM EDT by dryflash3]
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
Originally Posted By FrontyOwner:
what is the difference between the 505 and the 502? besides a few grains of capacity?

personally, I have had the zero drift on my Lee scale, but its been over a long period of time. during a relaoding session, the only issue I have is when using it as a verification and the setting moving. either bumping the veneer scale.


Link to 502 scale.

Link to 505 scale

Read the descripitions.

Main difference is 502 has a 2 poise beam, 505 has a 3 poise beam.

So for a few dollars more the 505 is a better scale.


you get one more poise on the beam to adjust instead of reading the tenths from a scale.
either way, I like that better than the vernier scale on the lee.

Fixed 505 link. dryflash3
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 6:07:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Hoppy:
I found the Lee to be accurate, but the poor damping made it a pain to use. I replaced it with a Lyman 500 and have been very satisfied. The Lee and the Lyman were equally accurate.


The damping does suck, but mine is very accurate. But I do use a reloading bench that is solid as a rock which helps out.
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 6:12:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MagnusM4:
The Dillon Eliminator scale is also a good scale if anyone else is looking for a balance beam scale, very comparable to the 505. It is a 3 poise just the like RCBS 505, has an aluminum base and it only costs about $55. I couldn't be happier with mine.


all this
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 6:15:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 7:09:31 PM EDT by dryflash3]
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
Originally Posted By FrontyOwner:
what is the difference between the 505 and the 502? besides a few grains of capacity?

personally, I have had the zero drift on my Lee scale, but its been over a long period of time. during a relaoding session, the only issue I have is when using it as a verification and the setting moving. either bumping the veneer scale.


Link to 502 scale.

Link to 505 scale

Read the descripitions.

Main difference is 502 has a 2 poise beam, 505 has a 3 poise beam.

So for a few dollars more the 505 is a better scale.
I must be clicking on them incorrectly.
Both links take me to the same page describing the 502.


Try again, I fixed the link. dryflash3
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 7:13:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 7:14:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2012 7:17:08 PM EDT by dryflash3]
Link Posted: 1/4/2012 7:24:22 PM EDT
ahem ....... that would be 'double charge post'

Link Posted: 1/4/2012 7:39:50 PM EDT
A set of check weights is worth the money no matter what scale you decide on.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:09:06 AM EDT
Finally zeroed the scale last night. Man that was quick and painless unlike the Lee. I have it set on a shelf right now, hoping to make a block for it and maybe a dust cover. I will try and weigh some charges tonight using my new dippers & trickler as well as my Lee powder measure and see how it goes.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 7:51:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GVShooter:
Finally zeroed the scale last night. Man that was quick and painless unlike the Lee. I have it set on a shelf right now, hoping to make a block for it and maybe a dust cover. I will try and weigh some charges tonight using my new dippers & trickler as well as my Lee powder measure and see how it goes.


I found the dippers require some extreme duplication in procedure to have consistency.

The powder measure consistency is susceptible to the tightness of the handle screw but once 'set' is pretty consistent. A powder baffle helps a lot as well.

It can be made out of soda pop soda can material. Do a google search for 'Uncle Nick's Powder Baffle Templates'. The PDF should be the first result. I forget which template it is but I can tell you that it is NOT the ID of the top of the Lee hopper lol. It tapers down.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 9:13:20 AM EDT
No matter what scale you use, make sure it's level before zero.
'Borg
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 9:32:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By We-rBorg:
No matter what scale you use, make sure it's level before zero.
'Borg


The shelf it is on right now is not level but I put it on a block of wood and used shims to get it level. I will pull the shelf and remount it later, along with many other bench projects.
Link Posted: 1/5/2012 4:04:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GVShooter:
Originally Posted By We-rBorg:
No matter what scale you use, make sure it's level before zero.
'Borg


The shelf it is on right now is not level but I put it on a block of wood and used shims to get it level. I will pull the shelf and remount it later, along with many other bench projects.

You know the white disc on the scale leg is the level adjustment screw right? That leg is threaded. Turn the white disc in/out until level.

Link Posted: 1/6/2012 12:18:53 PM EDT
Originally Posted By KB7DX:
Originally Posted By GVShooter:
Originally Posted By We-rBorg:
No matter what scale you use, make sure it's level before zero.
'Borg


The shelf it is on right now is not level but I put it on a block of wood and used shims to get it level. I will pull the shelf and remount it later, along with many other bench projects.

You know the white disc on the scale leg is the level adjustment screw right? That leg is threaded. Turn the white disc in/out until level.



Sorry I wasn't clear, I used shims to get the block of wood level and then leveled the whole scale with the disc on the block of wood. I didn't want to have to make a huge adjustment after leveling the shelf. I could have 86'd the wood and just leveled the scale on the unlevel shelf but I didn't...
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