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7/8/2020 3:01:36 PM
Posted: 1/25/2014 9:38:09 PM EDT
Is this necessary every time?
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 9:42:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/25/2014 9:42:58 PM EDT by IbuildedIT]
yes.

unless you feel like gunking up and ruining your dies rather quickly.  the secondary polish isn't needed though if your trying to save time.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 10:30:19 PM EDT
No but it keeps the dies clean.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 12:53:02 AM EDT
I do...
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 2:03:17 AM EDT
No. In fact, we tend to put in much more effort than is necessary. I knew a guy that would simply brush-out the case neck, and mainly neck-size (and pop-out the spent primer) with one of those cheapie Lee hand-held presses, which was probably his second set-up after the hammer-the-die set-up. His gun shot nicely, for a hunting rifle.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 2:54:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/26/2014 2:55:01 AM EDT by bani]
no, not necessary every time.

debris won't ruin dies unless your dies are made of aluminum or copper or something. mine are made of hardened steel and carbide.

just a bit of lube is all you need.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 5:09:51 AM EDT
If you have sand or dirt then you should clean the brass. But if it just has some soot you can load away.

Personally I like pretty  brass So I tumble before and after loading.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 5:39:32 AM EDT
You don't have to, but it's not a bad idea.  I just throw my fired brass in the tumbler with walnut for 30 mins or more just to get the sand and any other crap off.  I'd think repeatedly putting dirty/sandy brass in your sizing die will scratch it, and certainly having debris on your brass will cause dents during sizing.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 6:26:36 AM EDT
It's so easy to do, why wouldn't you?
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 6:28:58 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Weber:
It's so easy to do, why wouldn't you?
View Quote

This
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 6:45:52 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 6:52:11 AM EDT
My thoughts are, get yourself enough brass on hand that you always have clean brass around to load with.  

That way when you get done shooting you don't feel like you have to clean brass right away so it can be loaded again.  

I clean and inspect brass in batches and then store it in Ziploc bags.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 7:59:36 AM EDT
I have a homemade brass catcher and it funnels brass into a bucket.
Those go directly to loading.
If it touches the ground it gets cleaned.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 8:47:02 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MRBLACK947:


My thoughts are, get yourself enough brass on hand that you always have clean brass around to load with.  



That way when you get done shooting you don't feel like you have to clean brass right away so it can be loaded again.  



I clean and inspect brass in batches and then store it in Ziploc bags.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MRBLACK947:


My thoughts are, get yourself enough brass on hand that you always have clean brass around to load with.  



That way when you get done shooting you don't feel like you have to clean brass right away so it can be loaded again.  



I clean and inspect brass in batches and then store it in Ziploc bags.

This, although my new procedure since I got a Lee universal recapping die is to decap them at the first available free time- you can do a couple hundred in no time at all, then throw them in the tumbler before going to work. Wife will shut off tumbler after about four hours. Then they go into the appropriate storage can. This way I never have to store dirty brass.




 
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 9:24:40 AM EDT
Before I had a case cleaner I just wiped them off with paper towels.  Now I run them through case cleaner before sizing, if for no other reason that just to remove some powder residue so my hands stay a little cleaner while handling the brass.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 9:32:16 AM EDT
Yes
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 10:02:16 AM EDT


I wouldn't worry about the dirt eating the die, but the dies forcing the dirt into the brass.

Link Posted: 1/26/2014 4:09:01 PM EDT
No, it is not required. With steel dies you risk scratching them if the brass has grit or dirt on it. For carbide dies it is less of an issue.

Re-loaders use to wipe their brass off instead, some still do. Vibratory tumblers save time over wiping and allow you to make it shiner.

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