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Posted: 11/15/2008 7:10:27 AM EDT
I read that you should but I have spoken with a couple of long time reloaders that say they never trim .223 for the AR's.

Any thoughts?
Link Posted: 11/15/2008 7:20:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/19/2008 3:24:29 PM EDT by 4719DAVE]
factory crimp die can be your best freind . never said not to trim?.be safe
Link Posted: 11/15/2008 7:35:38 AM EDT
Originally Posted By defenderhome:
I read that you should but I have spoken with a couple of long time reloaders that say they never trim .223 for the AR's.

Any thoughts?


The RCBS X-dies are supposed to work without trimming.  As I understand it, You trim the cases a little under minimum OAL, after that you don't need to trim them.

For AR's, I use regular dies and I have to trim some of them every time I run a batch of ammo.  I check every case and if it's under 1.759" I don't trim. (If that number is wrong, don't flame me.  I'm in the car and I don't have a manual handy.)

On bolt guns I neck size only.

ZM
Link Posted: 11/15/2008 7:39:51 AM EDT
not trimming your brass so it's under max OAL 1.760" is bad reloading practice and can be unsafe
Link Posted: 11/15/2008 7:51:24 AM EDT
If it's under the MAX case length of 1.760, than you don't need to trim.  Depending on how hot you load your rounds and what length you trim you cases, Will decide how often you need to re-trim.

IE: If you trim you cases to 1.758, and you load to with max powder loads, you will need to retrim every time.  But if you trim to 1.751, and you load to min powder loads you can reload several times with out trimming.


Personally I Re-Trim every time,  Why?  Just because I like consistancy,  I always retrim my cases back to 1.751, that keeps my OAL dead on every time, and keeps every round the same, round after round.

-Masta
Link Posted: 11/15/2008 9:05:48 PM EDT
Same here, I trim every reload.

For me, just as easy to trim as to measure each case.

Never trim 223? I wouldn't take any of their advice seriously.

Reloading is about the little details. Be safe.
Link Posted: 11/15/2008 9:36:57 PM EDT
I set up to trim every time I go to load .223, but find that generally with my chosen load (which is a touch on the light side) I generally only have to trim every other time.  I have an X-Die, and it does seem to work as advertised.
Link Posted: 11/17/2008 7:11:46 AM EDT
I trim every time for .223 ammo. I do large batches of ammo and I have a giraurd, so I tumble a few hundred, decap/resize/inspect, tumble off the lube then I trim/chamfer/etc in my Giraurd.
Its actually just faster for me to put every piece in the trimmer than it is to measure each piece of brass. My brass also get a 2nd looking over as it goes into the trimmer (look at head stamp and throw out known thin web brass).

Someone saying they never trim .223 is someone I would not listen to for reloading advice.
Link Posted: 11/17/2008 5:45:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/17/2008 5:47:43 PM EDT by MikeinGA]
I saw a vid on Utube where a guy did not trim and his rounds did not chamber, so he used the bump to close the bolt, and the gun blew up when pulled the trigger.

Mike
Link Posted: 11/17/2008 6:43:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/17/2008 6:44:19 PM EDT by pdg45acp]
When I first started using Lee Factory Crimp Dies for my Rifles about 15 years ago I strayed away from trimming for about 2 years.

I came back to trimming and now I'm more anal about it than ever.
Link Posted: 11/17/2008 6:54:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By AssaultRifler:
not trimming your brass so it's under max OAL 1.760" is bad reloading practice and can be unsafe



As a newb, long ago, I didn't but it catches up to you. Now I trim once and use the X-die.


But yes, by all means you MUST trim or maintain proper case length.
Link Posted: 11/17/2008 8:09:09 PM EDT
WHY YES YES IT  SUCH A PAIN TO TRIM !!!!! but no more than anyother  prep work  prep this much time_________________________ and reloading this much time______. yep thats about right a nessecary EVIL but im doing it now. (oh my i hope i DISSTAIN has shown thru 4 trimming)
Link Posted: 11/17/2008 8:58:14 PM EDT
If you size the cases and they are too long, you need to trim them.  It's as simple as that.  
I finally broke the wrapper off my new Giraud trimmer.  It works great!!  I also work in huge batches.  Must have done a couple thousand or so....fingers are sore!!  Now I have to sort by headstamp and deal with the crimped primer pockets....bummer even with the Dillon swager, but only has to be dealt with once.
Link Posted: 11/17/2008 9:52:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sheldon:
Must have done a couple thousand or so....fingers are sore!!  


Try a rubber glove and your hand will thank you

Link Posted: 11/18/2008 2:34:26 AM EDT
I would think that if you did not trim to recommended length each and every time that it would affect your crimp ?
Link Posted: 11/19/2008 10:34:47 AM EDT
Either always trim or measure and just trim the ones that are too long. But you need to trim.

A short cut here, a short cut there, next think you know you just blew your rifle up...
Link Posted: 11/19/2008 11:39:01 AM EDT
So far this thread is an  opinion fest, without  technical info. If you really want to know, search this forum for a thread a few months back, wherein real information was provided. Several knowledgeable people posted,and explained CHAMBER LENGTH and case length relationships. Clearance is clearance. Buy a guage and Know!
Link Posted: 11/19/2008 11:48:59 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/19/2008 11:54:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/19/2008 11:57:11 AM EDT by panther308]
Your reloading manual should list a maximum case length for each particular caliber. If you let your brass get longer than that, you run the risk of the case neck being longer than the chamber of your gun can hold. When the bolt is closed in either a bolt rifle or semi-auto that extra brass has to go somewhere, so it get pinched into the bullet. That greatly increases the initial resistance to movement of the bullet and can cause pressures to really spike your best bet is to get a case gage if you don't have one it will serve you well over the course of reloading and will save you time and frustration for me .308 is maxed out at 2.015" and the recommended trim length is 2.005" some say if it falls within this range you are GTG but I choose to trim to the 2.005" each and every time and have never had a issue I usually see a stretch of .004-.006 after firing from my M1A
Link Posted: 11/19/2008 3:20:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By defenderhome:
I read that you should but I have spoken with a couple of long time reloaders that say they never trim .223 for the AR's.

Any thoughts?


i trim every case after i resize.  i have learned, at least with every gun i have ever owned, that consistant trimming is the biggest contributor to accuracy.

Link Posted: 11/19/2008 3:29:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MastaMarksman:
If it's under the MAX case length of 1.760, than you don't need to trim.  Depending on how hot you load your rounds and what length you trim you cases, Will decide how often you need to re-trim.

IE: If you trim you cases to 1.758, and you load to with max powder loads, you will need to retrim every time.  But if you trim to 1.751, and you load to min powder loads you can reload several times with out trimming.


Personally I Re-Trim every time,  Why?  Just because I like consistancy,  I always retrim my cases back to 1.751, that keeps my OAL dead on every time, and keeps every round the same, round after round.

-Masta


I agree 100%.I trim cases to 1.751"-1.752" after each resize/decap operation to achieve exact case length consistancy.This also provides for a perfect roll crimp on each round which I have come to prefer.Threw away the Lee factory crimp die (not because it did not do its job) but because of the deformation it created at the case mouth.I load exclusively Hornady's 55 grain FMJBT bullet.

Best,
Don

Link Posted: 11/19/2008 3:41:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By LuvBUSHmaster:
I trim every time for .223 ammo. I do large batches of ammo and I have a giraurd, so I tumble a few hundred, decap/resize/inspect, tumble off the lube then I trim/chamfer/etc in my Giraurd.
Its actually just faster for me to put every piece in the trimmer than it is to measure each piece of brass. My brass also get a 2nd looking over as it goes into the trimmer (look at head stamp and throw out known thin web brass).

Someone saying they never trim .223 is someone I would not listen to for reloading advice.


+1 !
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