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Posted: 9/10/2013 9:55:11 AM EDT


I'm planning on using the typical Rustoleum gray primer $5 cans of spray paint available at the Home Depot for my rifle stock finish.  I figured if that cheap $5 gray primer is labeled "auto primer" on the spray can, and so then it is supposed to be good enough for automtive paints, then I figure it should work OK with Duracoat and not wrinkle or disolve off when the Duracoat hits it.

I'll do a test piece first but was wondering if anybody's used Rustoleum gray primer with Duracoat . (??)
Link Posted: 9/10/2013 1:02:48 PM EDT
Don't believe everything you read on the internet or on a spray paint can. Yeah, you can temporarily paint a car with it. But it's not really the right stuff. Real auto primer is a two part epoxy primer with a catalyst that hardens the paint by chemical reaction.

You can never have that in a spray can because the paint would harden in the can. Spray paint hardens by evaporation of the solvent. It is a much weaker coating.

The Duracoat is a two part coating with a hardener. It's probably best to use that directly rather than apply it over a poor quality spray can primer.

Link Posted: 9/11/2013 7:17:30 AM EDT
I've already got the wood stock sprayed with Rustoleum gray primer. It's a very thin layer that I apply as I'm sanding the stock. I apply it mainly to highlight the wood imperfections as see how the stock is shaping.

The problem with obtaining good quality 2-part  paints or primers (resin & hardener) is that they are normally sold in quart and gallon sized quantities for auto body use. To buy $42 worth of primer alone in a quart sized can is a deal breaker. Those prices are fine if you are in business and doing a few rifle stocks, but not OK for a single stock that requires less then 4 ounces. At one time you could walk into a hobby shop and buy a 1/2 pint can of primer and hardener for about $10 -$12 a can, but the EPA has put a lot of those manufacturers out of business, and the internet has put a lot of hobby shops out of business.

I'll check the Rustoleum gray primer on test swatches and see how it holds up and adheres to Duracoat.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 7:48:21 AM EDT
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Quoted:
I've already got the wood stock sprayed with Rustoleum gray primer. It's a very thin layer that I apply as I'm sanding the stock. I apply it mainly to highlight the wood imperfections as see how the stock is shaping.

The problem with obtaining good quality 2-part  paints or primers (resin & hardener) is that they are normally sold in quart and gallon sized quantities for auto body use. To buy $42 worth of primer alone in a quart sized can is a deal breaker. Those prices are fine if you are in business and doing a few rifle stocks, but not OK for a single stock that requires less then 4 ounces. At one time you could walk into a hobby shop and buy a 1/2 pint can of primer and hardener for about $10 -$12 a can, but the EPA has put a lot of those manufacturers out of business, and the internet has put a lot of hobby shops out of business.

I'll check the Rustoleum gray primer on test swatches and see how it holds up and adheres to Duracoat.
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Yeah, I know what you mean.

If you are using the spray primer mostly as a filler for imperfections and wood grain and sanding off most of it, you will probably be OK. In my experience, putting strong coating on top of something less durable only gets you the durability of the weakest layer.

Test patches are always good.
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