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Posted: 1/23/2011 6:57:03 PM EDT
So i am just wondering if there is some unwritten rule that basically says that the light loads in a manual are going to cycle most weapons? Case in point, I have 100 or so 308 rifle rounds to get started, all for my bolt gun. Now getting ready to load some 45 acp that i finished cleaning and sizing, as well as some 5.56 that that i have cleaned and primed and sized. I want to be a safe loader and start with the light loads as suggested and work up, but I also dont want to load a few hundred rounds that wont cycle my 1911 or ar15s, and then be mad at the range next time I go. I know I could load 10 or so of each, but 10 rounds for my 1911 and 10 rounds for my ar15s isnt going to last long or be much fun at the range. Unfortunatly I cant just go out my back door and shoot either, its a 40 min drive or so to my normal shooting property and the closest range is owned by a bunch of dicks and is still 30 mins or more away.

Also I know that cycling depends alot on barrel and gas system and everything, so sorry if this is a stupid question.

Thanks
Pat
Link Posted: 1/23/2011 7:12:14 PM EDT
The only sure way is to shoot them
Link Posted: 1/23/2011 7:19:51 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/23/2011 7:32:40 PM EDT
Yep...shoot 'em.
Well, what loads had you planned on starting out with? I mean bullet / powder combinations? Lots of folks in here, at one time or another have probably tried a load similar to what you're looking at.
I know not all 1911's are the same, and all AR's aren't the same....but likely the starting loads in the manuals are enough to cycle the actions. More likely if you look at the loads specifically for AR-15 or Service Rifle data.
Link Posted: 1/23/2011 7:50:14 PM EDT
The very best thing you can do is start with a bullet that is proprietary to a manual. Like Sierra, Nosler, Hornady, Speer or you get my point. If you load brand x use brand x's manual.... You can also call these companies and visit with their tech departments. These guys are the pros.. You can visit about your weapon, use, and get sound recommendations on how to load... You will also get good data that will allow you to start higher than basement loads.... Sierra is the best at this and you don'have to buy their bullets to get advice... but it would be the right thing to do.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/23/2011 7:54:12 PM EDT
I need to test my loads at a range too, (ISRA is 15 miles away, Mega Sports is a rip-off) and I still am successful working my loads up the typical way.

I gather info from several publications, and average out a starting load. I then load up eight to ten at the starting load, and bump up my powder charge a few tenths of a grain or so (depending on caliber). Load eight to ten more, bump it again.

I set up my chronograph and target, start with the lightest charged cartridges, fire them and then inspect all variables (velocities, primer and brass condition, target, etc.). I continue on to the next set if all is well. You can always pull the bullets from test loads that you don't use.

Then, after I get home, I go in depth with all the results I gathered at the range. If I'm happy with one loading in particular, I'll load up 50 and "prove" them through the firearm I intend to use them in when I go back to the range.

Remember... What shoots good out of a 1911 will not necessarily shoot well out of a Glock or XD or whatever. Same goes for individual rifles.
Link Posted: 1/24/2011 3:18:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By We-rBorg:
The only sure way is to shoot them


Link Posted: 1/24/2011 4:54:44 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/24/2011 6:06:29 AM EDT
make some test loads from min to max, 10 each, shoot in that order. Take note which ones cycle and which ones don't. From the set that does cycle and doesnt show high pressure signs choose the most accurate one for your load

And don't go to the range just to test reloads. Bring other guns with known good ammo and blast away!
Link Posted: 1/24/2011 10:21:36 AM EDT
Actually, I'm going to the range in about an hour to test some 380acp loads in the method as we've described above.

I find that testing loads and gathering the data is just as fun as just going there to shoot known loads.
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 2:48:41 PM EDT
Interesting question: I have been working on a light 40 SW load for two different pistols, using the same bullet (which I have a lot of). One pistol will function reliably with 2.6 grains of powder. The other, requires 3.4 grains to get the same degree of reliability. One has a stock spring, seems to be about 8# using the crude scale I have, the other has a stock spring seems to be 12#. The 12#er takes the heavier load to operate. So you can see from this little example, that what it takes is very firearm dependent.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 9:02:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SLUHstud:
So i am just wondering if there is some unwritten rule that basically says that the light loads in a manual are going to cycle most weapons? Case in point, I have 100 or so 308 rifle rounds to get started, all for my bolt gun. Now getting ready to load some 45 acp that i finished cleaning and sizing, as well as some 5.56 that that i have cleaned and primed and sized. I want to be a safe loader and start with the light loads as suggested and work up, but I also dont want to load a few hundred rounds that wont cycle my 1911 or ar15s, and then be mad at the range next time I go. I know I could load 10 or so of each, but 10 rounds for my 1911 and 10 rounds for my ar15s isnt going to last long or be much fun at the range. Unfortunatly I cant just go out my back door and shoot either, its a 40 min drive or so to my normal shooting property and the closest range is owned by a bunch of dicks and is still 30 mins or more away.

Also I know that cycling depends alot on barrel and gas system and everything, so sorry if this is a stupid question.

Thanks
Pat


If you have a basement or garage....at home, indoors....shoot into a sand bucket. 10-12" of sand will stop about anything. I have the same problem with handy range access, so I do it at home. My chronograph range is also at home. Works better when the S.O. is shopping and kids are in school. Neighbors and dogs don't complain since I moved indoors.
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