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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/4/2010 10:01:50 AM EDT
Who has one ?


I will admit to .223 brass prep being cumbersome. Just imagine if pistol brass needed as much prep...... yet most shoot .223 like or more than pistol. I enjoy prep but it would be nice to batch annealing by the thousand instead of by the hundred.

I know most don't anneal and I'm happy for you. No, really. I am. A poll has been included for you guys.
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 10:19:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2010 10:20:35 AM EDT by danpass]
I don't but I've read of two methods.

Torch passed over the necks looking to see a certain coloring

and

Sticking them in the oven for a certain amount of time at a certain temp (this works the entire case obviously)
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 10:40:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2010 10:40:57 AM EDT by We-rBorg]
Originally Posted By danpass:
I don't but I've read of two methods.

Torch passed over the necks looking to see a certain coloring

and

Sticking them in the oven for a certain amount of time at a certain temp (this works the entire case obviously)

A very good way to ruin brass,, and maybe a rifle.
Don't do it this way.
I use one like this;
ammealer
'Borg

ETA,, can't see in the dark to spell
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 10:53:59 AM EDT
Originally Posted By We-rBorg:
Originally Posted By danpass:
I don't but I've read of two methods.

Torch passed over the necks looking to see a certain coloring

and

Sticking them in the oven for a certain amount of time at a certain temp (this works the entire case obviously)

A very good way to ruin brass,, and maybe a rifle.
Don't do it this way.
I use one like this;
ammealer
'Borg

ETA,, can't see in the dark to spell

I figured. Temps vary so much lol
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 11:01:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2010 11:24:09 AM EDT by 1911smith]
Originally Posted By danpass:
I don't but I've read of two methods.

Torch passed over the necks looking to see a certain coloring

and

Sticking them in the oven for a certain amount of time at a certain temp (this works the entire case obviously)



I've got a method using a pan of water. Water filled half the length of case and with a propane torch heat each side of case neck to a 3 second count being careful to not let brass glow red at any time. I don't use the paint either. If done with careful watch you can see brass turn shades. Never attemp to anneal brass in the oven described method. Softens case head.

'Borg... did you make yours ?

Link Posted: 9/4/2010 1:14:55 PM EDT
I built a machine based on the Brass o Matic.



Here is a grainy low quality video of it in action.

Link Posted: 9/4/2010 3:13:56 PM EDT
It's a crying shame Zephyr discontinued Brass-O-Matic. I've got a mig welder and plasma cutter. Enough to make a crude imitation of the Brass O Matic but don't feel enough motivation to get it done. Have seen Ken Light's machine and read it's a bottom feed. Can't imagine that being convenient and the machine looks to be over kill. It also requires a disk for each caliber and is priced $440.00 with shipping. Any one have this one ?
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 3:16:58 PM EDT
Drill, socket, torch and pan of water.

Rotate case in deep socket over flame, well before it turns red, dump into water.

Simple
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 3:23:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2010 9:24:24 PM EDT by txgp17]
I've tried it, but I think I got the brass too hot. I did it with the case head immersed in water, and tipped over the case when I was done.
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 6:18:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By zw123:
Drill, socket, torch and pan of water.

Rotate case in deep socket over flame, well before it turns red, dump into water.

Simple


Like your idea but I'm looking for more automation than a drill with deep socket.... Heat transfer in the socket would be a problem unless quenched every so often.


Brass-O-Matic would be perfect if someone made something like it.

Link Posted: 9/4/2010 6:56:25 PM EDT
This is what I'd like to see as a finished product, with a feed and dump system to make it as completely automatic as possible.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbjhTXvwVPU
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 7:44:47 PM EDT
First reaction is ––- COOL –––– however my pan and torch method is just as fast. O'well. 4000 done, 6000 left to do. Next batch.......
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 8:52:27 PM EDT
Do these provide any additional ideas?

http://www.6mmbr.com/annealing.html

Check out Bench-source. Seems to replicate the Brass-O-Matic http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/tag/cartridge-brass/
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 9:52:32 PM EDT
Dan, Thanks....

The Zephyr - Brass-o-Matic would be perfect and in the right price range had it not been discontinued. Ken Lights machine is a bottom feed and that concerns me.

The Vertex machine has some promise.

The world revolves around Ice Cream. Just finished a bowl off...... I bet a smart reloader could use a double disk, attached to lower part of ice cream maker drive. With a drop off point that went straight to a water filled bottom....... hhmmmm... with a reastat to adjust speed.... just an idea and whole lot cheaper than some other options..... hhmmm......
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 4:19:36 AM EDT
I anneal after three firings. Use a propane torch with pencil flame on the fatboy cylinder. The base of the cylinder fits perfectly in one side of the drain opening on my two bowl stainless sink in the shop. I fill the other bowl with some water. Use a light hand-held cordless drill with the appropriate socket for the size of the brass. Place the brass in socket, squeeze the trigger and hold so the flame is directed at the point where the case shoulder and neck come together. Spin for 6-7 seconds in the flame and watch as the annealing ring moves below the neck about 3/16 inch and then dump out into the water in the other sink bowl. Socket never heats up and doesn't need quenching. It all works very efficiently and very fast. Could spend hundreds of dollars on a machine but don't see the need since I can do a proficient job with household tools. JMHO.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 4:23:42 AM EDT
My shooting partner bought one from this company I think it was the 350 ? He's supposed to bring it over and I'm going to copy the wheel to build my own.Here's the link....... http://www.annealingmachines.com/home
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 6:12:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 7:47:29 AM EDT by angus6]
Originally Posted By Easy_E:
My shooting partner bought one from this company I think it was the 350 ? He's supposed to bring it over and I'm going to copy the wheel to build my own.Here's the link....... http://www.annealingmachines.com/home


E_E,, jmorris had several of the wheels/disk for sale awhile back , he also has great vids of his build

I do have some of the CNC laser cut “saw blades” (the hard part) along with scale traces of the top plate with hole location, arms and drive wheel. I can send them anywhere in the US for $45 + $10.35 shipping


Link Posted: 9/5/2010 7:22:08 AM EDT
The machine built by jmorris is really cool. I watched his videos (no I won't Google them for you) and the machine seems to work well. I talked to him one time over on CastBoolits and he had the indexing wheels available for guys that wanted to make a machine like his.

jmorris also makes some other cool stuff. He is definitely a guy to look to for the annealer.

Aww heck! I Googled it for you anyway...

jonblack
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 7:23:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 7:24:16 AM EDT by BattleRife]
Annealing is potentially useful but is very poorly understood. Most of what has been written about it is misleading or flat out wrong. Nobody even knows for certain the proper temperature to achieve, for crying out loud. The pan-and-water method most manuals have described for years is inconsistent and slow. The machines that have been offered on the market are ridiculously overbuilt and expensive. I didn't think anyone was stupid enough to anneal in the oven without water to protect the head, I figured it was just gunstore BS.

I have annealed using pan-and-water, dipping in a molten salt bath, and spinning the case (by hand or by drill) in a torch flame. The last one is the simplest and probably the best option for most people. I have some ideas for an automated machine that I might try to build one day, but I wouldn't put it on the market unless I could keep the retail price under $100.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 7:53:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 7:59:59 AM EDT by angus6]
It can be a real simply set up, several of them I've seen used old microwave tuntable motors
so much for trying to embed the video
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 12:55:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By angus6:
Originally Posted By Easy_E:
My shooting partner bought one from this company I think it was the 350 ? He's supposed to bring it over and I'm going to copy the wheel to build my own.Here's the link....... http://www.annealingmachines.com/home


E_E,, jmorris had several of the wheels/disk for sale awhile back , he also has great vids of his build

I do have some of the CNC laser cut “saw blades” (the hard part) along with scale traces of the top plate with hole location, arms and drive wheel. I can send them anywhere in the US for $45 + $10.35 shipping


http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/annealer/DSC01810.jpg


Thanks I'll try to track him down. I walk around a hardware store 10-12 hours a day so I'm always looking at parts to make things . I have a motor from a humidifier and a ceiling fan control for speed. We have propane heat and its plumbed to my barn so I have the fittings and regulators to hook up the torches. The rest of it is simple to make I just need to time.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 1:55:02 PM EDT
Well I picked this up earlier today, but it came in a bulk pack which included a fat can of propane for the same price.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xg2/R-100079143/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053


I also bought the B&D Pivotdriver cordless screwdriver Link but that is doing multiple case prep duties.

I charged it enough to try 2-3 cases in a socket and overall it worked fine. Its a challenge to see details in the flame and the brass in broad daylight though.


I even put a glove on and the rest of the case does get pretty hot lol
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 1:56:06 PM EDT
I haven't made up my mind yet but my next piece of equipment will be a Giraud Trimmer or a Bench Source annealing machine.

Link Posted: 9/5/2010 8:09:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2010 8:10:49 PM EDT by danpass]
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 11:04:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 1911smith:
Who has one ?


I will admit to .223 brass prep being cumbersome. Just imagine if pistol brass needed as much prep...... yet most shoot .223 like or more than pistol. I enjoy prep but it would be nice to batch annealing by the thousand instead of by the hundred.

I know most don't anneal and I'm happy for you. No, really. I am. A poll has been included for you guys.




RCBS Trim Mate with a cigar tube cut off and a bolt threaded through the bottom. Turns at about 120 RPMs and works fine. I did another 'cup' where I can place washers over the top, to better fit the various case sizes (338LM, 308, 223, 7 RM, 22-250) so it's a better option than the one pictured.

Chris

Link Posted: 9/6/2010 6:02:49 AM EDT
SIMPLE, CHEAP!!!

Anneal
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 6:29:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By zw123:
SIMPLE, CHEAP!!!

Anneal


That's the method I played with last night. That pinkish neck though came out of the resizer die rather roughly (with or without lube).

The cooler necks I got sized as usual.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:38:13 AM EDT
Ballistic EdgeModel 200, $250.00... phone number 602-818-6419. Jeremy

Thanks for the link.

Ordering next week. Not the most automated model .Looks like it anneals more uniformly than anything I've seen.

annealingmachines.com

Just spoke with Jeremy and he can make an arm that does .223 on one side and .308 on opposite. Sounds as if he will do special orders per your request.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 5:36:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2010 5:38:16 PM EDT by CCW]
The US Army Mil Spec for the M855 case requires a hardness value on the neck of 85 min to 114 max D.P.N. Hardness after anneal.

Because of the thin material, a micro hardness tester will be needed to verify the value. I found a used Ames Model S portable micro scale hardness tester on E-Bay for $250. It came with instructions, anvil assortment, and calibration blocks and a nice wooden case. The company no longer supports factory recertification of the tester but as long as the supplied hardness test & cal blocks are dead on, I figure it is good enough for reloader work.

Link Posted: 9/6/2010 5:47:48 PM EDT
That is a very nice instrument. Thank you for sharing.

jonblack
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