Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 9/30/2002 8:33:13 AM EDT
I really like the look and feel of the M1A but I have some questions about them.

First, I have heard that dry-firing them can cause damage to the rifle. Is this true?

Second, how does the rifle stand up to field conditions - rain, snow, dirt, etc? Is it easier to maintain in the field than an AR (not that the AR is difficult, I'm just using it as a gauge)?

Third, is bending the op-rod a common problem if heavier bullets are used or an out-of-spec (slightly over-pressured) round is fired? Are there any parts that have a tendancy to wear out after a few thousand rounds?

Fourth, If I get a standard model with a fiberglass stock, will taking the action apart to clean it degrade accuracy more every time I disassemble it? I know that it will for a bedded action, but what about for a standard, field-grade rifle? (I am not expecting to shoot sub-MOA groups; I am looking for 1 to 1.75 inch groups at 100 yards with good ammo though.)

Sorry for all of the newbie questions, but it seems like info on the M1A isn't as abundant as info for other rifles. Most of the info I find is related to match shooting, not field usage. Thanks.
Link Posted: 9/30/2002 12:55:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By High_Plains_Drifter:
I really like the look and feel of the M1A but I have some questions about them.

First, I have heard that dry-firing them can cause damage to the rifle. Is this true?


Not really. If you are worried you can buy snap caps to simulate a bullet in the chamber when you practice.


Second, how does the rifle stand up to field conditions - rain, snow, dirt, etc? Is it easier to maintain in the field than an AR (not that the AR is difficult, I'm just using it as a gauge)?


It holds up well. Its tolerances are looser than an air and allows it to shoot when filthy. Maintenance just lock the bolt back and clean the barrel and wipe out what you can on the inside.


Third, is bending the op-rod a common problem if heavier bullets are used or an out-of-spec (slightly over-pressured) round is fired? Are there any parts that have a tendancy to wear out after a few thousand rounds?


Ive never seen an op rod bend. Pretty hard to do that to forged steel. Is it possible with the newer ones from springfield? i dont know but i think it is unlikely. Im not sure what would be the first part to go as i havent had the problem of replacing any.
WHat i do not see breaking is the barrel, the reciever, the op rod spring, the op rod, the spring guide, the bolt. Maybe a small component in the trigger system or a part of the bolt might be the first to go. other than that i really dont see anything drastic happening


Fourth, If I get a standard model with a fiberglass stock, will taking the action apart to clean it degrade accuracy more every time I disassemble it? I know that it will for a bedded action, but what about for a standard, field-grade rifle? (I am not expecting to shoot sub-MOA groups; I am looking for 1 to 1.75 inch groups at 100 yards with good ammo though.)


If you keep pulling it apart it will make teh bedding less effective each time you do it. Just clean from the muzzle end of the barrel and do the best you can with the bolt area. With decent ammo or handloads that group is attainable from the standard model.



Sorry for all of the newbie questions, but it seems like info on the M1A isn't as abundant as info for other rifles. Most of the info I find is related to match shooting, not field usage. Thanks.



If anything is unclear or you have any more questions feel free to ask

Link Posted: 9/30/2002 1:02:38 PM EDT
He missed your meaning on the stripping the stock off.

If you are going for super accuracy, removing the action will affect your accuracy. However for hunting accuracy, taking a fiberglass stock off will not affect it too much. Only for deep accuracy

Hope that helps (The rifle will take hundreds of rounds to shoot itself into a tight accuracy niche again inte stock after removing the stock)
Link Posted: 9/30/2002 4:13:29 PM EDT
The short answer is that it is built like a tank and will probably shoot pretty well no matter what you do to it. But that's pretty much what you might expect from an M1 Garand with a detachable mag.

I know a number of people who have them, and the predecessor Garand. You will go a long way before you find a better rifle. (and it's a lot of fun, too.)
Link Posted: 9/30/2002 4:16:22 PM EDT
I should add that one of the gun mags did a torture test on the M1A some years back, before the AW ban. They put 10,000 rounds through it, as fast as a team of guys could load and pull the trigger. The barrel got so hot that it set the stock on fire several times. To put it out, they just dunked it in a bucket of water, shook off the excess, and kept firing.

They never had a significant failure. At the end of the test they fired a five shot group that was tighter than the group they fired when they started.

And you don't have one yet????????
Link Posted: 10/1/2002 9:06:30 AM EDT
Wow, thanks for all of the great replies. The M1A seems a lot tougher than some people give it credit for (especially at this site ). I was planning on purchasing an AR-10, but after checking out the M1A I think I 'll get it instead (I'll get the '10 later ).

Link Posted: 10/1/2002 3:12:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/1/2002 3:18:08 PM EDT by usmc0311]
The M1A Standard is not bedded.So taking the the synthetic/Walnut stock off will not affect it at all.
Match guns it will affect the bedding everytime you remove the stock.

The Standard,Bush,Scout and the Loaded models are not Bedded.
Link Posted: 10/1/2002 3:15:51 PM EDT
FYI,
www.battlerifles.com has a an M1A forum. Lots of experts there too.
Link Posted: 10/2/2002 8:16:08 AM EDT
usmc0311, I was hoping that the non-bedded models wouldn't be affected by removing the stock. Thanks for the info.

Sylvan, I have been over there - lots of good info. Thanks
Link Posted: 10/2/2002 9:04:22 AM EDT
even on the non-bedded models, it is still possible to mess it up by too frequent removal of the action.. remember.. the liner is what holds the action firm within the stock.. and the liner is metal... frequent movement of metal to metal will wear on the fit between the liner and the action...
Link Posted: 10/2/2002 9:23:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/2/2002 9:24:31 AM EDT by 308wood]

Originally Posted By wolfman97:
I should add that one of the gun mags did a torture test on the M1A some years back, before the AW ban. They put 10,000 rounds through it, as fast as a team of guys could load and pull the trigger. The barrel got so hot that it set the stock on fire several times. To put it out, they just dunked it in a bucket of water, shook off the excess, and kept firing.

They never had a significant failure. At the end of the test they fired a five shot group that was tighter than the group they fired when they started.

And you don't have one yet????????



yea but i bet it was not a 1" at 100 yd group.

Link Posted: 10/2/2002 11:33:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 308wood:

yea but i bet it was not a 1" at 100 yd group.




Hell, my match M1 will do that
Link Posted: 10/3/2002 5:15:25 PM EDT
The G.I. fiberglass stock does not have a steel liner. The receiver just sets into the molded fiberglass interior. The black krinkle finish and camo fiberglass stocks are nothing more than painted over G.I. surplus stocks that have the dings and dents painted over (unless you're talking the special $$$$ McMillan stocks). The long op rod of the M-1 had a tendency to get bent with high port pressure ammo but not so much the short op rod M-14. However, shooting any bullet heavier than 180 gr can mess up the bolt to receiver interface. We had one shooter that loaded Sierra Matchking 180 gr bullets hot and shot a M-14. One day, part way through 20 shots at 600 yd prone, he looked down and found a shiny metal crescent by his right elbow. It was half of the bolt roller from his bolt. Under "normal' use, the most likely part to break is the extractor. Next (and way later) would be the firing pin, hammer hooks, or rear sight cover (which is spring steel and holds tension on the rear sight). Other parts I have had fail ,while wearing out several barrels, were:firing pin, bolt latch roll pin, stock (wood split),right bolt lug snapped off, and flash suppressor (cracked between prongs).
Top Top