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Posted: 2/3/2016 6:18:30 AM EST
Link Posted: 2/3/2016 7:00:45 AM EST
Long-sleeved shirt? I thought that was a no-no around a lathe?
Link Posted: 2/3/2016 7:26:26 AM EST
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Originally Posted By eracer:
Long-sleeved shirt? I thought that was a no-no around a lathe?
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That's not me .....
Link Posted: 2/3/2016 7:49:25 AM EST
COOL!!!
Link Posted: 2/3/2016 7:56:39 AM EST
What was the guy freaking out about in the end. I was trying to hear what he was saying.

That's freakin ingenious though how it uses that 45 degree bar to control the twist like that.
Link Posted: 2/3/2016 8:16:42 AM EST
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Originally Posted By eracer:
Long-sleeved shirt? I thought that was a no-no around a lathe?
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Originally Posted By eracer:
Long-sleeved shirt? I thought that was a no-no around a lathe?

Considering it's not a lathe I don't see the issue...

Originally Posted By mancow:
What was the guy freaking out about in the end. I was trying to hear what he was saying.

A couple minutes before that I heard, "shit I just advanced it inaudible" followed by some grumbling then a minute or so later there is some excitement followed by partially audible speech about not advancing it, clever New Englanders, and got get that on camera. The video cuts off with it showing some sort of adjustment mechanism at the end of the stroke that interacts with the cutter and we don't really get to see the cleverness or what it actually does. I assume the depth the cutter makes is somehow controlled by that "button" at the end and that adjustment somehow changes that??

Originally Posted By mancow:That's freakin ingenious though how it uses that 45 degree bar to control the twist like that.

FWIW, it's not 45 degrees. The angle of that bar is what controls the twist rate. One would need to know the ratio of the rack & pinion gear that translates that linear movement into a revolving movement to be able to determine what angle correlates to what twist rate. Pretty neat machines none-the-less.
Link Posted: 2/3/2016 9:02:28 AM EST
Link Posted: 2/3/2016 12:38:14 PM EST
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Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:

Considering it's not a lathe I don't see the issue...

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Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By eracer:
Long-sleeved shirt? I thought that was a no-no around a lathe?

Considering it's not a lathe I don't see the issue...


Well shoot, that makes it OK to wear clothes that can get trapped in a rotating spindle.


Link Posted: 2/3/2016 6:37:13 PM EST
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Originally Posted By eracer:

Well shoot, that makes it OK to wear clothes that can get trapped in a rotating spindle.


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Originally Posted By eracer:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By eracer:
Long-sleeved shirt? I thought that was a no-no around a lathe?

Considering it's not a lathe I don't see the issue...


Well shoot, that makes it OK to wear clothes that can get trapped in a rotating spindle.



Good practice and a keen wit trumps all rules.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 2/3/2016 10:14:58 PM EST
Mesmerizing
Link Posted: 2/4/2016 9:27:07 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Cole2534:

Good practice and a keen wit trumps all rules.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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Originally Posted By Cole2534:
Originally Posted By eracer:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By eracer:
Long-sleeved shirt? I thought that was a no-no around a lathe?

Considering it's not a lathe I don't see the issue...


Well shoot, that makes it OK to wear clothes that can get trapped in a rotating spindle.



Good practice and a keen wit trumps all rules.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile

My point exactly.
Link Posted: 2/5/2016 2:15:51 PM EST
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Originally Posted By eracer:

Well shoot, that makes it OK to wear clothes that can get trapped in a rotating spindle.


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Originally Posted By eracer:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By eracer:
Long-sleeved shirt? I thought that was a no-no around a lathe?

Considering it's not a lathe I don't see the issue...


Well shoot, that makes it OK to wear clothes that can get trapped in a rotating spindle.




When i happens it will be over in a flash.

Drive spindles grab also.

If there is a spinning shaft short sleeves.
Link Posted: 2/6/2016 8:25:46 AM EST
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Originally Posted By brickeyee:


When i happens it will be over in a flash.

Drive spindles grab also.

If there is a spinning shaft short sleeves.
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Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By eracer:
Originally Posted By SigOwner_P229:
Originally Posted By eracer:
Long-sleeved shirt? I thought that was a no-no around a lathe?

Considering it's not a lathe I don't see the issue...


Well shoot, that makes it OK to wear clothes that can get trapped in a rotating spindle.




When i happens it will be over in a flash.

Drive spindles grab also.

If there is a spinning shaft short sleeves.

I've seen pictures of lathe accidents. I won't post them here.
Link Posted: 2/6/2016 8:38:29 AM EST
Long sleeves notwithstanding ..... that is an interesting piece of historical technology I think.
Link Posted: 2/6/2016 9:56:44 AM EST
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Originally Posted By GunCat:
Long sleeves notwithstanding ..... that is an interesting piece of historical technology I think.
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It is very interesting.

I commented on the obvious safety violation the same way I'd comment in the Reloading Forum if I saw a video of someone welding next to a bench with a press and an open 8 lb. powder bottle.

I really don't think my observation here merits a
Link Posted: 2/6/2016 11:05:02 AM EST
[Last Edit: 2/6/2016 4:02:57 PM EST by brickeyee]
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Originally Posted By GunCat:
Long sleeves notwithstanding ..... that is an interesting piece of historical technology I think.
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Many remain in use.

The properties that make stainless a PITA to machine make it a dream to cut rifle.

Like most commercial tooling the base components (bearings, etc.) tend to be pretty standard and easily replaced.
They just keep going, and going, and going.
Link Posted: 2/6/2016 12:22:53 PM EST
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Originally Posted By eracer:

It is very interesting.

I commented on the obvious safety violation the same way I'd comment in the Reloading Forum if I saw a video of someone welding next to a bench with a press and an open 8 lb. powder bottle.

I really don't think my observation here merits a
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Originally Posted By eracer:
Originally Posted By GunCat:
Long sleeves notwithstanding ..... that is an interesting piece of historical technology I think.

It is very interesting.

I commented on the obvious safety violation the same way I'd comment in the Reloading Forum if I saw a video of someone welding next to a bench with a press and an open 8 lb. powder bottle.

I really don't think my observation here merits a


Not directed at you...more of a comment on the sidetrack the thread took

(heading off to clean off my loading bench now )
Link Posted: 2/26/2016 10:31:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 2/26/2016 10:32:15 AM EST by NYresq1]
A few thousand pounds of cast iron will never wear out, and the little pieces that will, are made to be replaced. Many of the machines in the Remington plant in NY are well over 100 years old and still in use. Back then they made stuff to last!!!

Stuff made now is made with machined aluminum frames and sheet metal instead of massive steel forgings and giant frames of cast iron like back then. Its no wonder places keep using the old machines, nothing today can match them.
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