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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 8/4/2009 9:14:28 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/6/2009 6:20:53 AM EST by mlg123]
How many in here play the classic Savage game?

I'm up to two now. A 70's .243 and recently an earlier .300 (WooHoo!!! found out that thing was made in 1941)(pre-mil and pre-war!).

I've got several flat nose shooters too but the 99's simply reek of class.

MLG
edited for update

Ithica .22
Marlin 57
Win 92 .44-40 (Original 14" trapper)
Pre-64 Win 94 .30-30
Win 94 .30-30
Vintage Marlin 336 .30-30 (late 40s/mid 50s)
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 11:32:28 AM EST
Not right now.
Had a couple come and go.
Would like the get the .250 Savage back but the current owner isn't selling.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 1:33:19 PM EST
I have one in .250, I have yet to shoot it but, my father said it shoots pretty nice.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 4:16:11 PM EST
I own one, 1946 99EG .300Sav
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 4:16:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 4:16:40 PM EST by Beamy]
I own one, 1946 99EG .300Sav


double tap
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:58:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 7:58:30 PM EST by sjuhockey10]
Got one in .308 (ETA: 99E, I believe). Desperately want a .250.
Link Posted: 8/7/2009 3:25:07 AM EST
I have a 99c in .308 , mag fed lever gun goodness at its best.
Link Posted: 8/7/2009 4:28:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By whiskerz:
mag fed lever gun goodness at its best.


I have to agreee. Been shooting lever guns all my life & always thought the 99s looked kind of nice. First time I actually picked one up & fired it I was hooked. Imagine, a serious hunting rifle that carries & handles like a regular lever gun!

A true shame that Savage can't have a custom shop to produce these fine peices of equipment.

MLG

Link Posted: 8/7/2009 9:48:36 AM EST
I have heard tale that Savage stated the tooling for the original rotary rifles was worn out and that they would only produce the detachable magazine version then that fell by the way side due to lack of sales.

They let the tooling go because they weren't selling many of the rifles any longer to begin with and it just went downhill from there.

There were some quality issues with the guns and Savage never did attempt to fix the problems.

One would think that improving the quality and modernizing the equiptment used to produce it would have kept the gun in the running as a decent and well made hunting rifle.

They didn't do that so chalk the loss of this rifle up to poor company management.
Link Posted: 8/8/2009 3:40:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By Milo5:
I have heard tale that Savage stated the tooling for the original rotary rifles was worn out and that they would only produce the detachable magazine version then that fell by the way side due to lack of sales.They let the tooling go because they weren't selling many of the rifles any longer to begin with and it just went downhill from there.There were some quality issues with the guns and Savage never did attempt to fix the problems.One would think that improving the quality and modernizing the equiptment used to produce it would have kept the gun in the running as a decent and well made hunting rifle.
They didn't do that so chalk the loss of this rifle up to poor company management.


True enough, it was a pure marketing decision. They simply weren't selling enough of them to justify new machinery. Its a sad thing that the current fad for Super-Duper-Ultra-Bust Your Shoulder-Fat & Sassy Magnums have pushed a lot of fine firearms & companies to the wayside. Who'da ever thunk The Great Winchester Company would ever go broke or that the American shooter would go from extremely finely crafted PERSONAL firearms to our current standard fair of look alikes/clones. There just isn't anything personal about the modern Rem-gar-chesters on the gun shop shelves today.

I for one miss the days when you could go to the deer lease, look at the gun rack & tell what rifle belonged to whom, simply by looking at it from across the room.

I guess I'm getting old,
MLG

Link Posted: 8/8/2009 6:38:54 PM EST
300= 300 Savage?

Link Posted: 8/8/2009 6:58:56 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/8/2009 6:59:24 PM EST by ziarifleman]
I have two, a .250 Savage 99A made somewhere near the end of production, and a .30-.30 1899F Saddle Ring Carbine that was made sometime around 1910.

I should take pictures, right?
Link Posted: 8/8/2009 7:01:33 PM EST
Originally Posted By mlg123:
the American shooter would go from extremely finely crafted PERSONAL firearms to our current standard fair of look alikes/clones. There just isn't anything personal about the modern Rem-gar-chesters on the gun shop shelves today.

I for one miss the days when you could go to the deer lease, look at the gun rack & tell what rifle belonged to whom, simply by looking at it from across the room.

I guess I'm getting old,
MLG



Oh, hell yeah.
Modern guns, well, the ones most people have, are piles of shit compared to the craftsmanship you find inside pre-War guns.
Link Posted: 8/9/2009 3:29:23 AM EST
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
I have two, a .250 Savage 99A made somewhere near the end of production, and a .30-.30 1899F Saddle Ring Carbine that was made sometime around 1910.

I should take pictures, right?


You should, you really should!
My .250 was a late production 99A and I hear these are fairly rare, most of the late guns were chambered in .308 and .358 Winchester.
Link Posted: 8/12/2009 3:47:05 PM EST
I had a 99F my dad gave me. Pawned it once during an emergency. Went back later to get it and the fucking dealer sold it. Some BS about getting it mixed up with another one he had and sold the wrong one. Fucking douche bag.

Got some AR stuff for it instead but it never made up for loosing my dad's gun.
Link Posted: 9/19/2009 1:46:53 PM EST
I've always wnted one, but just haven't gotten around to it yet.
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