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Posted: 7/13/2010 9:21:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/13/2010 9:22:28 AM EDT by Muskyjerk]
I have a 1993 traditions replica Walker

I emailed them to confirm the load since the manual only said 20-30 grains of 3F

I got an answer back "55  grains of 2F" with a round ball

any idea why they would sugess 2F vs there old manual from 1993 stating 3F

any differences in pressures since there is more surface area with 3F..

I have a confirming letter into them, just wondering what you all think


Link Posted: 7/13/2010 10:45:01 AM EDT
I don't have a Walker...  Yes, there will be greater pressure with the 3F.  (That's what the theory says.)  I've taken to shooting my 1860 Colt with 2F but in the past I used 3F.  I didn't find much difference in recoil and POI between the two.  I suspect when shooting 55 gr out of a pistol 2F might be more pleasant but I doubt you will have any issues shooting 3F.
Link Posted: 7/14/2010 10:19:10 AM EDT
i shoot 35-40grs of FFF out of my Colt dragon. i think 55 is kinda stout.
Link Posted: 7/14/2010 2:58:17 PM EDT
55grains is near max.
Drop back to 45 and try that. My Walkers like 45-48grains.

3Fg will be more powerful than 2Fg in the same volume loading because its slightly denser.
If using 3Fg drop back to 40gr or so and try that.
Link Posted: 7/19/2010 4:59:09 AM EDT
Traditions emailed back with 3f.

couldnt get all 55 grains in the cylinder so I ended up with 50.

Link Posted: 7/19/2010 8:13:15 PM EDT
The only time I shoot 50gr of 3F is in my 1863 Remington Rifle Musket.  That is a bit of a stout charge for a handgun.
Link Posted: 7/20/2010 7:34:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/20/2010 7:34:42 AM EDT by jimr]
Originally Posted By Muskyjerk:
Traditions emailed back with 3f.

couldnt get all 55 grains in the cylinder so I ended up with 50.

and people wonder why these things blow up.


Link Posted: 7/20/2010 1:34:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By jimr:
Originally Posted By Muskyjerk:
Traditions emailed back with 3f.

couldnt get all 55 grains in the cylinder so I ended up with 50.

and people wonder why these things blow up.




The Dragoon was produced because of the problems seen with the fielded Colt Walker revolvers, namely, the Walker's large size, four and a half pounds, making it suitable only for use as a saddle-mounted revolver, the Walker's propensity for cylinders exploding on occasion when fired, and the Walker's habit of dropping the loading lever upon discharge, locking up the revolver action in the middle of combat. The Colt Dragoon Revolver had a comparatively shorter cylinder and held up to 50 grains of powder, whereas the Walker had used up to 60 grains of powder. The Dragoon Revolver had a shorter barrel at 7.5 inches (some later revolvers 8 inches) as compared to the 9 inches barrel on the Walker. A loading lever latch in front of the lever replaced the spring to keep the lever from dropping during recoil, thereby preventing jamming of the revolver. These variations made the Colt Dragoon Revolver 4 pounds two ounces. These changes also reduced the risks of the Colt Dragoon Revolver from exploding when fired, unlike the risk that had been demonstrated with the Walker revolvers.

just pointing out the difference between the Dragoon and Walker. If it is needed I dont know, just putting out the info I have.

later
Link Posted: 7/22/2010 6:38:35 AM EDT
I understand the originals had a reputation for blowing up.  But have any modern ones made of our much better steels actually blown up?
Link Posted: 7/23/2010 4:04:12 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Muskyjerk:
The Dragoon was produced because of the problems seen with the fielded Colt Walker revolvers, namely, the Walker's large size, four and a half pounds, making it suitable only for use as a saddle-mounted revolver,
All of the Walker and first thru third model dragoons were intended to be used in pommel holsters.  They were crew served handguns with the horse being an essential member of the crew.
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