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Posted: 1/10/2005 5:22:08 PM EDT
I have always intended to buy a 1917 Enfield, because it is what my grandfather was issued during WWII. I am more interested in it as a personal history link than anything else. I haven't gotten around to researching them yet, but today came across several today that are in good condition. Does anyone here happen to have an idea of what the going rate is for these rifles in good to vg condition? I'd usually do a lot of research myself, but won't have the time before these rifles move.
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 5:27:41 PM EDT
$250 at the lower end, $500 at the top end for VG to excellent condition all matching manufacturer marks.
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 5:37:47 PM EDT
Was he in the British Army?
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 5:49:29 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 5:58:05 PM EDT
Thanks for the price info Pthfndr. These ones look to be well overpriced at $655.

MauserMark, my grandfather was in the U.S. Army. The 1917 Enfields are U.S. rifles, produced by Winchester, Remington, and Eddystone, and chambered in 30-06.
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 7:31:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Doug_H:
Thanks for the price info Pthfndr. These ones look to be well overpriced at $655.

MauserMark, my grandfather was in the U.S. Army. The 1917 Enfields are U.S. rifles, produced by Winchester, Remington, and Eddystone, and chambered in 30-06.



why was he not given a Garand or 1903?
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 8:42:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MauserMark:

why was he not given a Garand or 1903?



He was part of the Air Corps, and was not originally issued a rifle by the U.S. Army. He was stationed in the Philippines prior to the war, and a Japanese attack on the first day of the war destroyed most of their planes. They were told to defend the airfield, and being cut off from American supplies, were issued 1917 Enfield rifles by the Philippine army. These rifles had been given to the Philippinos by the U.S., who had them left over from WWI.

The few men left from his squadron have told me that he was an amazing shot with a rifle, and that he and his best friend did quite a bit of hunting to feed them between the start of the war and their capture by the Japanese. They have a couple of really good stories about him.

Obviously, with my being a bit of a gun nut, I need to pick one of these rifles up some day.
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 9:51:26 PM EDT
A friend's father was in a military school in the Phllippines at the beginning of WWII. He was on the Bataan Death March, the HELL ships, and was nuked while being a slave at Hiroshima.

Dennis Jenkins


Originally Posted By Doug_H:

Originally Posted By MauserMark:

why was he not given a Garand or 1903?



He was part of the Air Corps, and was not originally issued a rifle by the U.S. Army. He was stationed in the Philippines prior to the war, and a Japanese attack on the first day of the war destroyed most of their planes. They were told to defend the airfield, and being cut off from American supplies, were issued 1917 Enfield rifles by the Philippine army. These rifles had been given to the Philippinos by the U.S., who had them left over from WWI.

The few men left from his squadron have told me that he was an amazing shot with a rifle, and that he and his best friend did quite a bit of hunting to feed them between the start of the war and their capture by the Japanese. They have a couple of really good stories about him.

Obviously, with my being a bit of a gun nut, I need to pick one of these rifles up some day.

Link Posted: 1/10/2005 11:00:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2005 11:01:15 PM EDT by swingset]

Originally Posted By Pthfndr:
$250 at the lower end, $500 at the top end for VG to excellent condition all matching manufacturer marks.



That's true for a WWII rebuild, which were parkerized and often restocked. These are what you'll likely encounter on the market. However, an original blued finish WWI gun in excellent shape and matching will fetch much higher prices. If you find one of those, expect to pay $700-$900.

Maker plays into it, as well. Eddystone tends to be the more common and less valuable of the makers, Winchester rifles command a higher premium.

Good luck, wonderful guns and a neat piece of history.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 10:34:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Doug_H:


He was part of the Air Corps, and was not originally issued a rifle by the U.S. Army. He was stationed in the Philippines prior to the war, and a Japanese attack on the first day of the war destroyed most of their planes. They were told to defend the airfield, and being cut off from American supplies, were issued 1917 Enfield rifles by the Philippine army. These rifles had been given to the Philippinos by the U.S., who had them left over from WWI.

The few men left from his squadron have told me that he was an amazing shot with a rifle, and that he and his best friend did quite a bit of hunting to feed them between the start of the war and their capture by the Japanese. They have a couple of really good stories about him.

Obviously, with my being a bit of a gun nut, I need to pick one of these rifles up some day.



Did he make it through the war?
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 12:29:28 PM EDT
I think the CMP has a few rack grade m1917's right now. I dont think they have any service grade ones left.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 4:01:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MauserMark:

Did he make it through the war?



His squadron was taken prisoner (along with all the other Americans) and were part of the Bataan death march. He was in two POW/slave labor camps until late 1944. He was then put on a hell ship bound for Japan. Unfortunately, his ship was sunk by a U.S. submarine. Long way of saying that he did not make it through the war.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 4:58:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Light_Storm:
I think the CMP has a few rack grade m1917's right now. I dont think they have any service grade ones left.



Their rack grade 1917's are shot out. When I was at the North Store, I couldn't find one that didn't swallow a bullet, and they looked like sewer pipes. They told me that was the norm. Dunno how they set their price so high on shot out guns, but needless to say I passed.
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