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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/19/2005 10:06:15 AM EDT
who has the pic of the ar15 xrayed?
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 10:13:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 10:15:04 AM EDT
thank you
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 3:25:29 PM EDT
Wow, that has to be a pretty strong wavelength used?
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 4:21:18 PM EDT
Why is the hammer in the air and not connected to the disconnector? Is it firing?
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:01:07 PM EDT
when you let go of the trigger the disconnector releases. Note the trigger assembly catches the hammer at the base.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:03:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Beefypeanut:
Why is the hammer in the air and not connected to the disconnector? Is it firing?



Grab your lower receiver, hold the trigger back, cock the hammer, watch what happens as you release the trigger and the hammer engages the trigger and disengages from the disconnector.

The hammer/trigger sear area is at the bottom of the front of the hammer and the top of the front of the trigger.

Surely you've removed your fire control group to see these parts when removed.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:06:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By uglygun:

Originally Posted By Beefypeanut:
Why is the hammer in the air and not connected to the disconnector? Is it firing?



Grab your lower receiver, hold the trigger back, cock the hammer, watch what happens as you release the trigger and the hammer engages the trigger and disengages from the disconnector.

The hammer/trigger sear area is at the bottom of the front of the hammer and the top of the front of the trigger.

Surely you've removed your fire control group to see these parts when removed.



I've built several ARs, I still don't get what it is doing though.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:14:44 PM EDT
study the picture at the top of the trigger and youll see if it is lowered it would disengage from the hammer. Doesn't look like much is holding it though I'll have to make sure to keep an eye on my safety while moving the rifle around
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:18:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/19/2005 6:29:42 PM EDT by DaddyDett]

Originally Posted By Firelotus:
Wow, that has to be a pretty strong wavelength used?



Xray technique is expressed in kilovoltage applied to the anode, and millivoltage x time applied to the cathode, rather than wavelength.
An example would be an old school chest technique of 10 mas at 72 KV. Single phase, 72 in, high speed screen, medium grid, no Potter-Bucky diaphragm.

Probably not an X-Ray per say. Unless you have an ultra high KV output tube,
in the 300-400 KV range, it's unlikely to penetrate that density level.
Rather a radiograph using an industrial source like strontium, which is producing
Beta radiation, primarily. The amount of radiation used for this top of shot would probably be expressed in milliroentgens.

DaddyDett
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:38:22 PM EDT
Those were my observations also.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:02:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Beefypeanut:


I've built several ARs, I still don't get what it is doing though.




Okay, get one of your rifles and dry fire it while empty. Cock it, dry fire but continue to hold the trigger down, while holding the trigger down get on the charging handle to recock the rifle, once the bolt is back in battery...

listen to what happens when you release the trigger. You should hear a tell tale "POP" from when the hammer disengages from the disconnector while the trigger comes forward to reset and engage the sear of the hammer.

When firing, the hammer does not fall from it's position of engagement with the disconnector. The hammer falls from it's position where it mates with the front "nose" of the trigger.

Consider what kind of movement/arc that the trigger makes and the angle/arc of movement the disconnector makes in unison with the movement of the trigger, pulling the trigger causes it to come forward so that it can engage the hammer while it's being cocked by the bolt. The disconnector is there to hold the hammer until the trigger is released and comes back up to a position where the hammer sear can mate with the trigger once again.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:16:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cycobushmaster:
Those were my observations also.




uh huh.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:44:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DaddyDett:

Originally Posted By Firelotus:
Wow, that has to be a pretty strong wavelength used?



Xray technique is expressed in kilovoltage applied to the anode, and millivoltage x time applied to the cathode, rather than wavelength.
An example would be an old school chest technique of 10 mas at 72 KV. Single phase, 72 in, high speed screen, medium grid, no Potter-Bucky diaphragm.

Probably not an X-Ray per say. Unless you have an ultra high KV output tube,
in the 300-400 KV range, it's unlikely to penetrate that density level.
Rather a radiograph using an industrial source like strontium, which is producing
Beta radiation, primarily. The amount of radiation used for this top of shot would probably be expressed in milliroentgens.

DaddyDett




I have no idea what you just said, and I took that picture.

I used a Golden Engineering 'Inspector' with Polaroid TPX film. That's my wifes gun, now.

Link Posted: 9/19/2005 8:02:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eodinert:


I have no idea what you just said, and I took that picture.






WIZZO
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 8:37:18 PM EDT
Awesome pic, thanks!
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 11:08:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DaddyDett:
Xray technique is expressed in kilovoltage applied to the anode, and millivoltage x time applied to the cathode, rather than wavelength.
An example would be an old school chest technique of 10 mas at 72 KV. Single phase, 72 in, high speed screen, medium grid, no Potter-Bucky diaphragm.

Probably not an X-Ray per say. Unless you have an ultra high KV output tube,
in the 300-400 KV range, it's unlikely to penetrate that density level.
Rather a radiograph using an industrial source like strontium, which is producing
Beta radiation, primarily. The amount of radiation used for this top of shot would probably be expressed in milliroentgens.

DaddyDett




I concur.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 12:53:10 AM EDT
Whatever.

Where's the M16 x ray?!?
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 1:13:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 1:24:03 AM EDT by Tweak]
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 1:14:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By a320az:
I concur.



Yes...quite...indeed.

(puffs on pipe)
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 1:50:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DaddyDett:

Originally Posted By Firelotus:
Wow, that has to be a pretty strong wavelength used?



Xray technique is expressed in kilovoltage applied to the anode, and millivoltage x time applied to the cathode, rather than wavelength.
An example would be an old school chest technique of 10 mas at 72 KV. Single phase, 72 in, high speed screen, medium grid, no Potter-Bucky diaphragm.

Probably not an X-Ray per say. Unless you have an ultra high KV output tube,
in the 300-400 KV range, it's unlikely to penetrate that density level.
Rather a radiograph using an industrial source like strontium, which is producing
Beta radiation, primarily. The amount of radiation used for this top of shot would probably be expressed in milliroentgens.

DaddyDett



Yikes! Now my head hurts.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 1:56:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By eodinert:

Originally Posted By DaddyDett:

Originally Posted By Firelotus:
Wow, that has to be a pretty strong wavelength used?



Xray technique is expressed in kilovoltage applied to the anode, and millivoltage x time applied to the cathode, rather than wavelength.
An example would be an old school chest technique of 10 mas at 72 KV. Single phase, 72 in, high speed screen, medium grid, no Potter-Bucky diaphragm.

Probably not an X-Ray per say. Unless you have an ultra high KV output tube,
in the 300-400 KV range, it's unlikely to penetrate that density level.
Rather a radiograph using an industrial source like strontium, which is producing
Beta radiation, primarily. The amount of radiation used for this top of shot would probably be expressed in milliroentgens.

DaddyDett




I have no idea what you just said, and I took that picture.

I used a Golden Engineering 'Inspector' with Polaroid TPX film. That's my wifes gun, now.




LOL what can I say, AF X-Ray training is good, I remember all that stuff 30 yrs later, and havent worked in the field in 13 yrs.

High output screening machine?
Adobe is screwed on this computer.

Scarey that people without knowledge of radiation physics can operate X-Ray equipment.

DaddyDett

Link Posted: 9/20/2005 3:19:37 AM EDT
Thanks for the photo,
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 3:23:54 AM EDT
A lot has changed in thirty years. The device he used opperates from a Dewalt cordless drill battery. High Frequency H-Bridges are wonderfull things.
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