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Posted: 10/19/2004 4:22:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/19/2004 4:24:21 PM EST by AROKIE]
check this out, some of you may have seen one but this is my first. I might say not cheap either, but i know there is some out there who think they need it all

https://www.vbd.com/noc/shop/products_detail.asp?CategoryID=60&ProductID=286
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 4:38:58 PM EST
Still cheaper than my stripped lower, stupid CA laws making me buy the neutered lower =(
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:13:59 PM EST
I wonder what alloy it's made of. Theres a HUGE diffence in the properties of each alloy. If this is some grade 2 shiz it won't be any better than aluminum. 3al2.5v or 6al4v would be the only alloys I would consider using
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:16:21 PM EST

Originally Posted By AROKIE:
check this out, some of you may have seen one but this is my first. I might say not cheap either, but i know there is some out there who think they need it all

https://www.vbd.com/noc/shop/products_detail.asp?CategoryID=60&ProductID=286



www.vbd.com/noc/shop/products_detail.asp?CategoryID=60&ProductID=286
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:19:12 PM EST
Whooptie frigging doo.



Titanium and titanium alloys are used in airplanes, missiles and rockets where strength, low weight and resistance to high temperatures are important.



This is used for Neither Airplanes, missiles, or Rockets. Nor is it exposed to high heat.

Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:42:26 PM EST
Actually, titanium is commonly used in aircraft, and aircraft fasteners. If it's not being used in aircraft, please tell my titanium tubing suppliers that so I can get first dibs on it instead of the military and aviation community, lol. Us sports industry people basically get the left over scraps. The beauty of titanium is that it can flex without fatigue. Steel absolutely cannot flex without substantial fatigue, nor can cast aluminum. Titanium has shown it's merit in some high heat applications such as valves in high performance engines. It's also commonly used in tubing for nuclear reactors, and anywhere that corrosion is a problem. I cannot speak for rockets and missles, I have no experience with those. I do know that I deal with titanium on a daily basis, and know for a fact, that when using the correct alloys, it is by far superior to any other metal currently being used. The ONLY drawback to Ti is cost, and as it becomes more commonly used, the price will drop.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:45:35 PM EST
LOL its wierd how the written word is so much easier to misunderstand.

I think he meant that a AR lower is not used in any of the fashions mentioned so the properties of titanium might be wasted on it.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:55:21 PM EST
lol, I see what you mean. I agree, it would pretty much be a waste. Maybe if you were gonna put one of those .50BMG uppers on it it would be something to look into, especially since it's an 80% finished lower if i read the add right
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 5:57:01 PM EST
Titanium for AR lower is overkill. Save the money and get 2 more forged aluminum lowers!
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 6:02:17 PM EST
I hear they're making a bio-degradable lower from flour and recycled newspaper!
Should go over big with the alternative fuel crowd!
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 6:56:09 PM EST
If you look at the receiver, it isn't finished! It probably qualifies for 80%, it is not ready to build into a rifle.

Link Posted: 10/19/2004 7:11:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/19/2004 7:13:25 PM EST by caneau]
And we're getting excited over this? Oly's been making a complete titanium receiver for a while now, called the T3Ti. Costs $375 if you buy it from them, but less if you have your FFL order it from them directly. The thing is, the AR doesn't need titanium, stainless steel, or anything else significantly stronger than aluminum to function. Unless you're going to be shooting some massive calibers through your gun, aluminum receivers can outlast the shooter because there is so little stress on the lower. For the cost of one T3Ti stripped, I could have a $110 aluminum receiver with a stock and a match trigger group completed. Now something I would get excited about would be a reliable titanium bolt, barrel, etc. where there could be some true potential for weight savings and reliability.

On a side note, that receiver won't even work for .50 BMG. The mag well's too small.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 7:14:24 PM EST
Yep all their crap looks to be over priced.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 7:15:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By Darkest2000:
Titanium for AR lower is overkill. Save the money and get 2 more forged aluminum lowers!



Its heavier than aluminum for no benefit.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 7:25:04 PM EST
Well, I'm not sure if it's lighter. 7075 T6 aluminum is not pure aluminum. It's actually an alloy consisting of of course aluminum, zinc, magnesium, copper, chromium, and a few other metals. If that stuff is pure titanium, it'd probably be pretty close in weight.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 7:42:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/19/2004 7:43:51 PM EST by tannery_shop]
THIS GUY SELLS THEM TOO BUT ALOT CHEAPER THAN ( NOC )

HE JUST GOT BACK FROM A LONG TOUR 370 DAYS IN THE SANDS OF IRAQ AND KUWAIT, NOW HE BACK TO SERVE YOU!

www.tanneryshop.com/PRODUCTS.html
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 7:50:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By caneau:
Well, I'm not sure if it's lighter. 7075 T6 aluminum is not pure aluminum. It's actually an alloy consisting of of course aluminum, zinc, magnesium, copper, chromium, and a few other metals. If that stuff is pure titanium, it'd probably be pretty close in weight.



Titanium is heavier than aluminum. Titanium AR lowers are for sure. Cool, but pointless.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 8:22:49 PM EST
Interesting try at using a different material, I guess.
Link Posted: 10/19/2004 8:28:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:

Originally Posted By caneau:
Well, I'm not sure if it's lighter. 7075 T6 aluminum is not pure aluminum. It's actually an alloy consisting of of course aluminum, zinc, magnesium, copper, chromium, and a few other metals. If that stuff is pure titanium, it'd probably be pretty close in weight.



Titanium is heavier than aluminum. Titanium AR lowers are for sure. Cool, but pointless.



What I'm saying is that rarely is a pure metal used. Instead, alloys are used with somewhere between 5 and 10% of the material is something other than the base. Pure titanium is of course heavier than pure aluminum, all one needs to do is refer to a periodic table for that answer. What I am not sure is though, is how the alloys used in the receiver constructions compare in weight. Even if it is lighter, it's definately not significant to justify 3 times the price.
Link Posted: 10/20/2004 7:14:08 AM EST

Originally Posted By Lazyshooter:
Interesting try at using a different material, I guess.



I have an AR10 lower made of premium Georgia Pacific Pine. It was a mock up built on a CNC. I'm sure it would be good for a couple of rounds
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