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Posted: 10/26/2004 3:14:43 PM EST
does anyone use this? are they a good product? it looks like you just press them in to install them. do they stay in place? i know the duckbill grip or the magpull trigger guard are probably better but i am looking for a inexpensive way to get this done. i don't want to do the duct tape thing.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:17:35 PM EST
They go in real easy and they do stay in. I use them in all my guns. Its really not that big a deal. some lowers have rough edges there and some ppl have a tendency to stick their fingers in the hole (dunno why) . it jus makes it smoother.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:31:37 PM EST
they work fine. i still use one on my older ar15

Tex78
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:34:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By die-tryin:
They go in real easy and they do stay in. I use them in all my guns.



+1
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:36:56 PM EST
People who do carbine classes, competitions and such can't say enough about them. Saves wear and tear on your finger, the one that sits under the trigger guard all day long. I hope to be one of those types next year.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:38:25 PM EST
Yep one of the better aftermarket gizmos for the AR. Get one hell get three or four.

IPSC_GUY sends
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:58:55 PM EST
They are friction fit, and they stay in there.
Get one, it would be worth it at twice the price.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 4:03:56 PM EST
works for me

but it sucked trying to get it in; i had to pop out the trigger guard pin to get in it
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 5:28:12 PM EST
OH Yeah!!!! The best after market gimo IMO!!
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 5:34:47 AM EST
There are a couple small parts that make an AR work and feel much better. The Gapper is one of them, along with an Accuwedge or Tension Pin, Wolff Extractor Spring/Defender, etc. I have one and it really does help save your middle finger (so that it's good and ready for the drive back from the range )
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 5:39:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By occaar:
does anyone use this? are they a good product? .



I have them in all my ARs. Yes they are a GREAT product - much better than stuffing a foam earplug in the gap.

However I've noted some of the newer grips have a 'duckbill' that effectively covers the gap (like the Tango Down battlegrip). If your grip has a duckbill they are not needed.

They are (surprisingly) a cheap POS looking thing that actually works - and works well.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 5:48:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By occaar:
does anyone use this? are they a good product? it looks like you just press them in to install them. do they stay in place? i know the duckbill grip or the magpull trigger guard are probably better but i am looking for a inexpensive way to get this done. i don't want to do the duct tape thing.



Great little inexpensive addition!
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 5:56:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By mongo001:
People who do carbine classes, competitions and such can't say enough about them. Saves wear and tear on your finger, the one that sits under the trigger guard all day long. I hope to be one of those types next year.



Mongo is right, I took a carbine class this summer and every one, and I mean everyone was looking for a Gapper after the first day. It was a good thing I had a little first aid kit in my car because some guys had worn holes in their fingers! I used gloves for the class but have since switched over to the Tango Down grip but I still highly recommend the Gapper.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 9:19:32 AM EST
I bought one on a dare. Now almost all of my 16 ARs have 'em. Take the grip free to install them, it's much easier and safer than driving out the pin.

If you take a carbine course, or shoot 3 gun matches, or blast a lot, it'll pay off in no time!

Get 'em, use 'em. Funny thing is they range in price from $2 to $6 for the same thing, depending on where you get it from.

Tom
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 9:51:19 AM EST
I'm cheap! I made a $1.99 product and it took me an hour, a piece of hard rubber I had in the basement, a file, and sandpaper and a 1/4" drill, but, I made it, it's mine and I'm proud of it!
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 10:10:39 AM EST
I like my gapper. My reciever was so tight that I had to loosen the pistol grip, stick it in there, and then tighten it back up. Tight squeeze! For some reason my AR doesn't need a acuwedge, it is super tight already. I have an accuwedge that I was planning on puting in but it doesn't even fit!
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 10:18:39 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 10:29:58 AM EST
It's the best couple bucks you can spend on an AR15. Takes away all the sharp edges and makes you feel sexy when you hold it.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 10:37:01 AM EST
Definitely worth the minor investment
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 10:43:56 AM EST
I just got one and boy is it a great help. I've got bony knuckles and unless I shoot from a benchrest the whole time, my finger won't be happy at the end of the day. Until now, that is!
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 10:46:33 AM EST
Not to diss the gapper (having never used one), but I honestly don't get it. I've used an AR for years, to include MOUT and CQC training, and never felt the need for one. Then again, I tend to wear gloves when I go play infantry with my rifle.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 10:55:11 AM EST
To appreciate it you have to install one and see for yourself. Most people use the gapper as an excuse to log onto Bushmaster's site and buy other stuff too.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 10:57:16 AM EST

Originally Posted By voilsb:
Not to diss the gapper (having never used one), but I honestly don't get it. I've used an AR for years, to include MOUT and CQC training, and never felt the need for one. Then again, I tend to wear gloves when I go play infantry with my rifle.



If you wear gloves you don't have to worry about it. Gloves saved me back in June but there may be a time when you don't have gloves available. In that case a Gapper or something like the TD grip will come in handy.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 10:47:28 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2004 10:50:01 AM EST by voilsb]

Originally Posted By M4arc:

Originally Posted By voilsb:
Not to diss the gapper (having never used one), but I honestly don't get it. I've used an AR for years, to include MOUT and CQC training, and never felt the need for one. Then again, I tend to wear gloves when I go play infantry with my rifle.



If you wear gloves you don't have to worry about it. Gloves saved me back in June but there may be a time when you don't have gloves available. In that case a Gapper or something like the TD grip will come in handy.

Yeah, I figured it was largely due to the gloves. I've never had a problem with it without gloves, but those are usually plinking/range sessions. I tend to make sure gloves are available for tactical training, partly because of the subdued color and partly to protect my hands from stuff other than just my rifle.
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 10:59:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2004 10:59:41 AM EST by 4get_No1]
Love it. I didn't take anything off and actually got mine in with the help of a popsicle stick.


that didn't sound right
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 11:17:58 AM EST

Originally Posted By 4get_No1:
Love it. I didn't take anything off and actually got mine in with the help of a popsicle stick.


that didn't sound right



Bragger
Link Posted: 10/28/2004 7:27:49 PM EST
I was going to buy a Gapper, but I wound up making my own using a hot-glue gun, a popsicle stick to smooth the edges, and a little patience. Took me about 4 minutes from to .

If your wife has one of these glue-guns or you can borrow one, great. Otherwise, buy a Gapper and be done with it.
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