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Posted: 2/26/2007 9:35:00 AM EST
for those of you who reload .223 for accuracy, how much do you save vs. buying accurate ammunition such as black hills or other such ammo. if anybody who has done the basic math i would like to know if it is cheaper, and by how much. i know .223 prices are going up, but are still some what inexpensive. thank you for any help.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 9:44:47 AM EST
here in Italy ammo are way too expensive and reloading can save you lots of money
if you reload you can save money and get the best ammo for your rifle.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 9:53:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By mattpcos15:
for those of you who reload .223 for accuracy, how much do you save vs. buying accurate ammunition such as black hills or other such ammo. if anybody who has done the basic math i would like to know if it is cheaper, and by how much. i know .223 prices are going up, but are still some what inexpensive. thank you for any help.


This always depends on what your time is worth and how much you shoot. Do you consider the amount of time you spend reloading to be "free time" or is there something else paying you $30/hr that you could do instead and just buy ammo?

When you first get into reloading you can easily drop $1K to get setup with a press, a case trimmer, dies, tumbler, powder, primers, bullets. After a while you find a powder you like, primers you like, and bullets you like. My first 69g SMK round that I wanted to stick with probably cost me >$200 but then all the others were made for pocket change.

When I was playing with powders and primers, trying to find what I liked, I bought them by the pound and box. Now I know what I want and can buy 8 pounds of powder and cases of primers.

To get great cost savings from reloading you have to buy in bulk. Group buys save you lots of $$$ but then you have $$$ tied up in supplies. If you live paycheck to paycheck then it's not easy to buy in bulk and draw from the supplies over the course of the year; it's easier to buy a box of black hills and shoot it over the weekend.

For the match stuff you can save quite a bit. For the plinking stuff it's almost easier to buy the cheap stuff, shoot it, then reload the brass for something you like.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 9:56:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By Gixxersixxer:

This always depends on what your time is worth and how much you shoot. Do you consider the amount of time you spend reloading to be "free time" or is there something else paying you $30/hr that you could do instead and just buy ammo?


This is true! There are some here who get mad when you factor your own time into the equation.

If you do consider your time, there's no savings at all. Especially with all the brass prep time involved with rifle ammo. You really have to do it cuz you like to do it.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 9:57:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 2/26/2007 10:00:38 AM EST by 10MMGary]
Hello mattpcos15,
I hand load for multiple calibers and will start loading for 223 Remington again soon. I can tell you from past experience that one rarely saves money hand loading especially if one counts their time. What will happen is you'll be able to shoot more often for the same money or a bit less and you will be able to custom tailor loads for your specific gun. As good as the best premium ammo company are, they are not able to do that. I know it is a cliche but no two guns shoot the same. Additionally hand loading is a hobby in its own right and nearly as addictive as shooting or gun collecting for some. Also the true savings if any are not realized until one has loaded the same brass few times. Of course there is always the initial expense for components and press and dies and vibrating tumbler and powder and so on and so on. Now if you ask me if you should hand load I will absolutely say yes, everyone should(well almost everyone).
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 10:15:25 AM EST
I did the math not too long ago. Im did not feel like buying Match HPBT's for $17 for 20 rounds. I stared making my own with used and new Winchester brass, CCI primers, Various powders and SMK 77gr HPBT's. Plus, these loads were made just for my gun, as far as the powder it liked, plus the COAL. These are things you cannot buy, or have the factory change for you. Anyways to buy 1000 rounds, its going to cost you roughly $700 to $900. I reload the same quality ammo for about $200-$250 for 1000. But if your new, and don't have the equipment, its going to be hard at first to justify, but if you have the press, or other things, Its way worth it. Just my .02!
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 10:46:29 AM EST
I'm reloading .75gr bthp molys in winchester 1x brass , cci primers , vihtavuori powders and still comes out cheaper. you can buy 20rnds for $18.00 or load your own and make 100 rounds for the same price.



Granted the reloading equipment is costly but it pays itself off quickly.

Redding T7 Turret press or a RCBS Rockchucker single stage will be all you need and either will last a lifetime.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 11:20:03 AM EST
I can load 1000 rounds of 55gr fmjs for about $130 with free brass ad a little more if you have to buy brass. The cheapest reloads I have seen are $230 per k
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 11:21:44 AM EST
0

I shoot more so any cost savings is out the window.
Link Posted: 2/27/2007 8:25:58 AM EST
thanks for the info. i've determinned that my time is worth spending on reloading and turning out enough ammo to make it worth while is very doable. thanks again for the help.
Link Posted: 2/27/2007 9:55:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By Gregory_K:
I shoot more so any cost savings is out the window.


Ain't it the truth. I can reload at about 35% of what factory ammo costs, yet I shoot X more rounds. My savings is negative in overall spending basis, but is almost X on a per round cost basis.
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