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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 10/5/2007 12:57:43 PM EST
i've been bitten by this damn retro bug! my question is after i remove the material to make a partial fence lower, how do i prep the surface for using norells kit? do i sand blast it or would stripping it using chemicals? my three prong flash hider needs to be done also. if i sand blast will it make the holes out of spec on the lower? if i wanted to match the upper receiver to the lower would i dismantle it or use high temp tape? what about the ejection port cover? i know these are a lot of questions so thanks in advance.
Link Posted: 10/5/2007 3:30:02 PM EST
+1 I'd like some input as well. I got my Norrell's in yesterday's mail and plan to finish some stuff this weekend. Instead of a partial fence, I'm making mine a slickside, and using a 601 upper. The lower started out as a DPMS. I'm also thinking of coating the sight wheel, selector, bolt holdback, mag release, slip ring, port door and sight screw. I'm going to leave the barrel stuff alone, since my Norrell's is an early light grey. I think I may finish the lower and leave the upper for later, since I only have one 601 upper, and not likely to find another. I still have a bunch of grinding to do...
Link Posted: 10/5/2007 4:17:45 PM EST
I usually bead blast before finishing, but I think other have stated that beadblasting is a little too fine, and that you should use something courser like sand blasting. I will defer to others.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 8:04:43 AM EST
When I first started I used Stickman's guide. Also, Norrells website has info on refinishing.

Also, personally I try to leave as much of the anodizing on as possible for strength, unless it gets welded on it, then you can send it to Victor (US Anodizing) to have it re-anodized.

Refinishing AR15s with Norrells Moly Resin - by: Stickman
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 10:47:04 AM EST
Most sources seem to say 3 - 5 coats. Do you cure each coat, or spray it 5 times then cure it?
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 2:35:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2007 2:36:16 PM EST by swgaboy]
spray it 5 times ,then you cure it. clean the pin holes out if not it will be a pain to put pins in I found out the hard way
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:24:26 PM EST
US Anodizing

www.usanodizing.com/
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 5:42:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2007 5:44:44 AM EST by postino]

Originally Posted By AKARS:

Also, personally I try to leave as much of the anodizing on as possible for strength...you can send it to Victor (US Anodizing) to have it re-anodized.


I have been musing about having my two modified [partial fence removal] lowers anodized...but reading the do-it-yourself anodizing threads/articles here leads me to believe -

(1) Anodizing by itself does not give the required color (dyeing will be required)

(2) The holes will still need to be re-reamed to get the pins to fit properly (thus removing the anodizing where it is needed most)

I'm not overly concerned about [outer] surface hardness; it's where the pins fit that I believe the most wear will occur. Keeping them cleaned and well lubricated should minimize this concern. (This applies to my lowers only)

I decided to go the Norrells route. Moly Resin and air-brush are en route.
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 9:07:04 AM EST
great info guys! cant wait to finish
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 4:48:19 AM EST
I have a cheap blast cabinet + glass beads; I noticed that after coating (2 coats only) a lower with Brownell's Gun-Kote and blasting it afterward (more machining required - fence removal) that the Gun-Kote blew right off...There was minimal adhesion...(it also scratched/chipped fairly easily)...

I'd cured it at 300ºF for an hour after drying for a half-hour, and no finish came off with lacquer thinner afterward, so I'm confident I got the curing right...

...But I'm not so sure that bead blasting is the way to go...I priced fine blasting sand at Ace Hardware; only $13 for 100#, so that's not a problem (except carrying it home), so I may try that...

But it definitely leaves a much coarser finish, and I'm apprehensive that will show through the Norrell's Moly Resin I have on order...

Has anyone tried both??? Can you comment???
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 5:04:15 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/10/2007 5:04:45 AM EST by neverenuf]
I've tried both finishes. Norrells is far superior.

Gunkote seemed to chip easily.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 5:09:23 AM EST

Originally Posted By neverenuf:
I've tried both finishes. Norrells is far superior.

Gunkote seemed to chip easily.


Good enough. That supports my opinion of Gun-Kote.

How about the surface preparation??? Is bead blasting sufficient or is sand really required to get good adhesion to the aluminum used on lowers/uppers???
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 6:52:15 AM EST

Originally Posted By VAAR:
Most sources seem to say 3 - 5 coats. Do you cure each coat, or spray it 5 times then cure it?


Spray 5 or so times, then cure. You are just trying to get complete coverage without any runs. Also, Heat the part up good before spraying to keep from running. Makes the MEK in the Norrells evaporate quickly without runs. Mist on fine coats, don't try to get complete coverage with each pass. If you get a run, spray another coat.

I've got a lower with 3 different colors, 10 or so coats, that I've cured 4 times, one on top of the other that you can still get the trigger and hammer pins in and out without too much difficulty.

Mark
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 7:58:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By postino:

Originally Posted By neverenuf:
I've tried both finishes. Norrells is far superior.

Gunkote seemed to chip easily.


Good enough. That supports my opinion of Gun-Kote.

How about the surface preparation??? Is bead blasting sufficient or is sand really required to get good adhesion to the aluminum used on lowers/uppers???


I applied Norrells over existing anodizing, just degreased it with brake cleaner.

Check the Norrells web site on prep instructions.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 8:06:44 AM EST

Originally Posted By neverenuf:
I applied Norrells over existing anodizing, just degreased it with brake cleaner.


But is it adhering well??? Here's a quick test: take a piece of Duct tape (*real* Duct tape!) and stick it down on the [dry] Norrel's and skoosh it down real good...then rip it off, violently!!!

It the Norrell's comes off, then it's not adhering well...
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 9:35:59 AM EST
using norrells do not use glass beads it just polishes metal use sand or aluminum oxide 60-90 grit.
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 9:46:15 AM EST

Originally Posted By swgaboy:
using norrells do not use glass beads it just polishes metal use sand or aluminum oxide 60-90 grit.


I think that is the way I will go...sand, that is...

Do you tape off the surfaces where you won't be painting (so they don't get blasted)??? Or does it not matter???
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 9:56:35 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/10/2007 9:57:36 AM EST by MarkRSims]

Originally Posted By postino:

Originally Posted By neverenuf:
I applied Norrells over existing anodizing, just degreased it with brake cleaner.


But is it adhering well??? Here's a quick test: take a piece of Duct tape (*real* Duct tape!) and stick it down on the [dry] Norrel's and skoosh it down real good...then rip it off, violently!!!

It the Norrell's comes off, then it's not adhering well...


It sticks real well. I have yet to scratch it driving in roll pins. However, on my A1 upper, my brass is chipping it away when it ejects and hits my forward assist. However, I think that I may have not gotten a good cure there.

Don't media blast, or sand just clean the parts really good and degrease with MEK or Acetone.

Mark
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 12:01:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/10/2007 12:02:26 PM EST by neverenuf]

Originally Posted By postino:

Originally Posted By neverenuf:
I applied Norrells over existing anodizing, just degreased it with brake cleaner.


But is it adhering well??? Here's a quick test: take a piece of Duct tape (*real* Duct tape!) and stick it down on the [dry] Norrel's and skoosh it down real good...then rip it off, violently!!!

It the Norrell's comes off, then it's not adhering well...


Holding up just fine! The finish will not come off with duct tape. It is stuck real good to the lower!
Link Posted: 10/10/2007 2:42:24 PM EST
you made an A-2 to an A-1 lower this is what mine looks like before painting.


the black is a marker to see if logo and words on side would show up.I blasted the whole lower lightly went over where it is black. cleaned with air then wiped off with mek.
here is what it looks like now

Link Posted: 10/10/2007 4:43:34 PM EST
If you're using Norrells over an existing finish, such as anodizing or park, you're good to go unless the finish is old, and worn smooth.
If this is the case, you need to blast, in order to rough-up the surface of the metal. The ideal media to use is fine grit aluminum oxide.

You don't want to remove anything more than you need to.
Sand will work, but even when careful, it WILL eat into the anodizing, then it leaves a crappy looking rough surface due to its larger grit size.
The a.o. will also eat into an existing finish, but due to the finer grit size, you have more control with it.

BTW, this blasting is not an option .... and hand sanding doesn't work.

If re-working a receiver that removes a large area of the existing anodizing, I'd recommend having the piece re-anodized. Then if necessary, use the Norrells to match colors. Norrells is a fairly hard finish, but nowhere near hard enough to use in place of type III anodizing.

As far as de-greasing, I prefer to 'soak' the pieces for at least a few hours in something like acetone, then give it a final bath in MEK.
You can use brake parts cleaner (non-chlorinated), but do NOT use carb. cleaner.

One more thing .... the 'tape-test' isn't always a good indicator for a good finish. I've seen bad finishes that will still pass this test.
It has to be REALLY bad to peel off with tape.
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