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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/21/2005 4:23:27 PM EDT
Should I just run a few patches with breakfree and then some dry ones?

Bushmaster says not to run any solvent or brushes through it for the first few hundred rounds?

Does that sound ok?

Thanks
Matt
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 4:34:24 PM EDT
Put another couple hundred rounds through it and then run a couple patches of CLP down it.

WIZZO
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 5:12:25 PM EDT
k, I was just trying to make sure I wasnt going to mess anything up, sounds good.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 5:42:20 PM EDT
another 2 thousand rounds and the rifle will be nice and smoothe
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 6:07:06 PM EDT
Shoot till you run out of ammo, then go buy more ammo. Repeat until you are broke or board.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 6:21:43 PM EDT
They always say around here, 600 rounds without FTF.

And don't over clean it like soaking it overnight with bore solvent.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 6:27:41 PM EDT
finish off the other 900 rounds from the case and then clean it as you normally would.

i've been going about 1300 rounds without cleaning my new bushmaster M4gery yet. it's getting really nice and smooth. had a few FTE in the first couple 100 rounds but none since it has gotten really dirty.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 6:31:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By grizzlyarms:
finish off the other 900 rounds from the case and then clean it as you normally would.

i've been going about 1300 rounds without cleaning my new bushmaster M4gery yet. it's getting really nice and smooth. had a few FTE in the first couple 100 rounds but none since it has gotten really dirty.



Got ya beat...I fired approximately 2.3k rounds through my Bushy M4gery.I decided to take it apart and had to clean it after what I seen.The carbon buildup was huge.I used only XM193 and had one ftf due to some box glue(from the XM193) getting on one of the rounds,didn't even notice it loading up the mags.

I am very happy with my Bushy,I try to clean it after every 300 rounds now.

Link Posted: 8/21/2005 7:38:41 PM EDT
i wouldnt let it bother me too much and just clean it.

when i got my first bushie i put over 1k through it without cleaning inbetween and it shoots much better than i do
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 8:03:10 PM EDT
Bushmaster says not to run any solvent or brushes through it for the first few hundred rounds?

and why is this?what could doing this harm?
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 10:39:23 PM EDT
I'm sorry...just getting that out of the way up front. Maybe its the "old" Army in me...whatever...I cannot and would not put a dirty rifle up in the cabinet....I cannot imagine how doing this would "improve" any weapon's performance...especially an AR that "shits where it eats" so to speak....You are not going to harm your rifle by properly cleaning and lubing it after firing it. just my $.02.......note trying to criticize, or piss anyone off. That's just my practice and opinion.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 10:43:26 PM EDT
In the army, cleaning is used for discipline. In the civilian world, you can be more rational. I have guns that go 3k of Wolf between cleanings with no failures; 100 is peanuts.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 11:09:10 PM EDT
Just keep shooting it, you can clean it later
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 11:16:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2005 11:20:33 PM EDT by ExParatrooper]

Originally Posted By Not_A_Llama:
In the army, cleaning is used for discipline.



Negative.

In the Army, all PMCS (this includes cleaning of weapons) conducting on equipment is simply to extend the service life and reliability of the equipment.

Oh, and +1 to shortarm53's reply. In all the years of owning ANY type of firearm, it never gets put away without a cleaning. Old Army habit, but it really helps out with the old "I'll clean it later" problem.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 11:23:03 PM EDT
Meh, I'm anal. I try to clean all my guns after every range trip. I know my guns can take it, but it just irks me to put a dirty gun away.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 12:57:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/22/2005 1:02:23 AM EDT by Not_A_Llama]

Originally Posted By ExParatrooper:

Originally Posted By Not_A_Llama:
In the army, cleaning is used for discipline.



Negative.

In the Army, all PMCS (this includes cleaning of weapons) conducting on equipment is simply to extend the service life and reliability of the equipment.


Do you really think the "white glove" standard is just out of concern for equipment wear? Cleaning is given the emphasis it is to instill character and discipline. There is undoubtedly a real equipment issue, but it's only a real concern at the far end of the abuse spectrum.

Unless you're shooting corrosive ammo, or if you've been in the rain, your weapon is not going to deteriorate from storing your gun uncleaned.

If you never take your gun to the extremes of performance, you'll never know what it's capable of.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 4:42:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WIZZO_ARAKM14:
Put another couple hundred rounds through it and then run a couple patches of CLP down it.

WIZZO



Link Posted: 8/22/2005 5:03:37 AM EDT
clean it
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 5:07:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mrrick:
Bushmaster says not to run any solvent or brushes through it for the first few hundred rounds?

and why is this?what could doing this harm?



Not harm, rather shooting bullets smooths out the chrome liner in the barrel. After it is smooth your cleaning will be much easier and very little copper fouling - unlike a carbon steel barrel.

G
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 5:15:47 AM EDT
Clean is good.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 5:36:58 AM EDT
Leave it - run a couple hundred more - then clean
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 6:57:35 AM EDT
If you shoot a couple hundred more rounds before you clean it its likely fine, if you clean and relube now it might take a bit longer for it to get totally smooth and reliable . No big deal one way or another .
Myself- I would let it slide for the time being unless the range was really dusty (fireing prone near the dirt ? ) or pehaps if it was hot and you got your sweaty hands all over the gun .
This design is set to hammer out lots of rounds at a full auto rate. Think of the way full auto would heat up and throw off any lube . Think at how that compares to us guys buying our own ammo and pinging away at our slow semi auto rate---- Don't worry , relax and shoot you gun in any reasonable way you choose and it's going to be ok. We should all live so long to wear out our ARs used at any level below total abuse .
I understand you are here asking for information because you want to take good care of your new toy.The truth of the matter is that most of us here (maybe all of us ) really can't answer your question because none of us has ever worn out an AR.Some of us have abused them by shooting nasty ammo or withholding cleaning and lubeing to the point they don't work well anymore. Once we take a few moments to clean and relube they are just fine
Anyone actually wear out any AR? heavy use or abuse?
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 7:14:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Not_A_Llama:

Originally Posted By ExParatrooper:

Originally Posted By Not_A_Llama:
In the army, cleaning is used for discipline.



Negative.

In the Army, all PMCS (this includes cleaning of weapons) conducting on equipment is simply to extend the service life and reliability of the equipment.


Do you really think the "white glove" standard is just out of concern for equipment wear? Cleaning is given the emphasis it is to instill character and discipline. There is undoubtedly a real equipment issue, but it's only a real concern at the far end of the abuse spectrum.

Unless you're shooting corrosive ammo, or if you've been in the rain, your weapon is not going to deteriorate from storing your gun uncleaned.

If you never take your gun to the extremes of performance, you'll never know what it's capable of.



You should have worded your first comment a bit differently, then. It really came off as sounding like hours spent cleaning a rifle in the Army was strictly some form of punishment, and nothing else. I know what it's all about there. I base my opinion on years of experience serving in the US Army.
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