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Posted: 9/29/2011 6:08:37 AM EST
standard 54 yrs old have bi focals, went to sight in troy di optic sights, when I attempt to see if i am centered in the rear sight I cant focus on it because of needing bi focals for close up work, can see the front sight okay, but then I lose the definition of the rear sight to check for being centered, any tricks beside having someone with good eyes to sight in, have an aimpoint on this one also, which I have no problem for me to sight in thanks ahead of time
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 6:18:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 6:19:18 AM EST by sinlessorrow]
Originally Posted By mayorbilk:
standard 54 yrs old have bi focals, went to sight in troy di optic sights, when I attempt to see if i am centered in the rear sight I cant focus on it because of needing bi focals for close up work, can see the front sight okay, but then I lose the definition of the rear sight to check for being centered, any tricks beside having someone with good eyes to sight in, have an aimpoint on this one also, which I have no problem for me to sight in thanks ahead of time


dont focus on the rear sight, use the small aperture and focus on the front post.
this should cause the rear sight to ghost out basically so its just a shadow
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 6:21:53 AM EST
the troy di optic rear sight seems to have quite a large aperature, so maybe by what you say I should put one of my standard troy buis on and then just try to focus on the front sight?
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 6:35:16 AM EST
Originally Posted By mayorbilk:
the troy di optic rear sight seems to have quite a large aperature, so maybe by what you say I should put one of my standard troy buis on and then just try to focus on the front sight?


I just looked up the sight and it should have 2 apertures a large and small all you have to do is flip it and brin the small one up
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 6:59:17 AM EST
the smaller of the 2 is basically a diamond shape cut in half
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 12:48:52 PM EST
Originally Posted By sinlessorrow:
Originally Posted By mayorbilk:
standard 54 yrs old have bi focals, went to sight in troy di optic sights, when I attempt to see if i am centered in the rear sight I cant focus on it because of needing bi focals for close up work, can see the front sight okay, but then I lose the definition of the rear sight to check for being centered, any tricks beside having someone with good eyes to sight in, have an aimpoint on this one also, which I have no problem for me to sight in thanks ahead of time


dont focus on the rear sight, use the small aperture and focus on the front post.
this should cause the rear sight to ghost out basically so its just a shadow


I feel for you, mayorbilk- I'm there too! Same buis, same situation. I think the large size diamond is not a help. I found it easier to sight in a second rifle using a standard round peep sight (Magpul Gen II), the aperture is smaller than the "huge" dioptic. (Sometime in the future you'll see my dioptic up on the EE, I'll be changing over to Troy Battle sights or the like. If your eyes are OK, I think this sight will work well for you.) But, understand this, the rear sight is still blurry, but the aperture of the round peep is easier to work with. YMMV with the round peep. I did have an easier time lining up the sights without my glasses, but the seeing the target wasn't easy, and let's face it, we're not going to be shooting without our glasses. Rumor has it that it's always good to be able to identify your target!

sinlessorrow- When gaining your sight picture, one should shift focus between front and rear to gain proper sight alignment, finally maintaining focus on the front sight post for the shot- the rear sight and target should be blurred. Old eyes have a hard time with the shift- that rear sight is blurry! I hope you never have to experience it, it sucks.

I'm up for any suggestions, also! I hope I'm wrong, but I don't think there is a solution, other that a red dot.

John

Link Posted: 9/29/2011 1:05:36 PM EST
I also wear bi-focals, and have the same problem. I have a Magpul on another AR, and encounter no such difficulties. I was impressed with the quality of the Troy, and understand the concept, but for my eyes it was a complete failure. Before I experiment on sights anymore, I will try to find someone local that has one og whichever. I will also try to examine a regular Troy. Oh, how getting old can sometimes suck.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 1:08:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 1:08:23 PM EST by Cold]
Topic Moved
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 1:11:37 PM EST
Hmm didnt realise it was cut in hakt, that would be odd to use, i suggest getting a sight with a O-2 round sight .

Im pretty sure the diamond was designed to use with the diamond front sight. If you have a standard front sight get a standard rear

Magpuls are decent range buis, personally i use the arms #40 with the O-2
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 2:00:05 PM EST
If you can't see it well enough to sight it in, why even have it? I would sell it in th EE and get a normal set of apertures. Notch rear sights are the suck IMHO.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 3:11:04 PM EST
Look at your prescription for your bifocals, if the near portion is the same in both eyes (a +1.5, something like that) get a pair of reading glasses from Walmart or any drugstore. You'll need a different power for rifle shooting than the reading portion of your bifocals since the front sight is farther away than the "reading" distance the optomitrist uses. Short of that measure the distance from your shooting eye to the front sight and have your optomitrist check your eyes at that distnace and have glasses made for that distance. Also, focus on the FRONT sight, the rear sight should be a fuzzy circle. Just put the front post in the middle of the fuzzy circle. My near vision is the same in both eyes so a cheap pair of reading glasses a little weaker than the reading portion of my bifocals works fine. For other ideas of how to handle shooting and vision issues related to bifocals check any competitive shooting forum, match shooters deal with those issues a lot.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 5:27:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 5:28:20 PM EST by mparker762]
I've been using a pair of Superfocus glasses for a couple of years now. They allow you to adjust the focal length of the glasses from about 4" out to infinity. So I just set the focus to the front sight (differs depending on the rifle) and shoot away.

The other nice things about the superfocus glasses is that the entire lens has the same focal length, so when reading the paper or a computer the entire page or screen is in focus. Also computer screens are generally farther away than the normal reading distance, and since I stare at a computer roughly 10 hrs a day this is probably the most important thing for me.
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