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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 6/5/2008 3:39:27 AM EST
Does anyone know of a way to darken up a bare aluminum part so its not so shiny. Like can you put in in some sort of chemical solution.

I know cooking certain type of food in aluminum pans darkens it up, at least till you cook tomatoes in the pan. But since I'll be in a low tomato environment, I'm not too worried about loosing my ghetto anodization.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 3:52:36 AM EST
I don't know if I'd try to do a whole gun with it, but Birchwood Casey Aluminum Black does reasonably well with small areas.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 4:00:37 AM EST
You could always go the Dura Coat route.

http://www.lauerweaponry.com/
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 4:51:53 AM EST
Bead Blast
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 4:57:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/5/2008 4:59:45 AM EST by savageman101]
We have some vibratory tumblers in the shop with ceramic media that if ya leave aluminum pieces in there long enough they turn almost black.Leave them in there "TOO LONG"and they disappear.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 5:15:18 AM EST

Rust-o-leum hi-temp barbecue paint. Heat part to 100 degrees in oven and spray on a couple of light coats.

ZM
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 5:32:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/5/2008 5:37:04 AM EST by Bangz]
Alumahyde II Flat Black from Brownells gives a very nice finish (non-bake $10 /can.) I spray this on every AR, front of the handguards, barrel/frontsight tower. It matches the receiver very nicely and adds a layer of protection on the phosphated steel. I've also done stocks and grips with it. On metal, once it cures, you can't tell that it is not anodizing. Thin, light coating, just enouch to cover and change the color. This gives the best finished product.

The Alumablack(Birchwood Casey Aluminum Black ) is very useful for very small areas and I typicall use it when I chop a carry handle to finish the cut areas to match.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 6:44:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By rightwingnut:
Does anyone know of a way to darken up a bare aluminum part so its not so shiny. Like can you put in in some sort of chemical solution.

I know cooking certain type of food in aluminum pans darkens it up, at least till you cook tomatoes in the pan. But since I'll be in a low tomato environment, I'm not too worried about loosing my ghetto anodization.



Link Posted: 6/5/2008 7:34:19 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/5/2008 7:42:15 AM EST by Gamma762]
Why don't you just anodize it? It's not complicated.

ETA:
Using a google search for home anodizing aluminum... found a simple tutorial on a paintball website
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 7:38:20 AM EST
Sharpie
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 7:42:01 AM EST

Originally Posted By rightwingnut:
Does anyone know of a way to darken up a bare aluminum part so its not so shiny. Like can you put in in some sort of chemical solution.

I know cooking certain type of food in aluminum pans darkens it up, at least till you cook tomatoes in the pan. But since I'll be in a low tomato environment, I'm not too worried about loosing my ghetto anodization.


Scotch-Brite pads.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 7:44:22 AM EST

Originally Posted By ZekeMenuar:
Rust-o-leum hi-temp barbecue paint. Heat part to 100 degrees in oven and spray on a couple of light coats.

ZM

I'll do you one better: Dupli-Color engine paint with ceramic. It's rated at 1200 degrees, IIRC, and you can bake it at 350 degrees for an hour or so.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 9:02:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Why don't you just anodize it? It's not complicated.

ETA:
Using a google search for home anodizing aluminum... found a simple tutorial on a paintball website


+1. It's easy. I've done it using a cooler, acid from Home Depot and a battery charger.
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 1:26:37 AM EST
Wow, thanks guys!

I haven't look at links yet, but I did read yesterday that anodization is essentially aluminum-oxide, so there is probably a pretty simple way to do it w/ chemichals & maybe some current.

Also,
does annodization increase surface hardness & durability against wear? For example, is the anodization of the upper receiver important to its ability to hold up to friction w/ the carrier group?
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 1:52:38 AM EST
http://www.pbnation.com/forumdisplay.php?s=7566671ec79d39d192e5a912d1433d5c&f=270

Yep, it's a paintball website, but it has a ton of anno info.
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 2:03:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By rightwingnut:
Wow, thanks guys!

I haven't look at links yet, but I did read yesterday that anodization is essentially aluminum-oxide, so there is probably a pretty simple way to do it w/ chemichals & maybe some current.

Also,
does annodization increase surface hardness & durability against wear? For example, is the anodization of the upper receiver important to its ability to hold up to friction w/ the carrier group?


For all practical purposes in this application - most likely not from my laymans understanding.
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