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Posted: 1/8/2005 8:56:59 PM EDT
i've searched and not been able to find many topics on this but in the topics i have found, each side seems to be even with cleaning it and not cleaning it.

what are some arguments why you should and should not clean it? i've run about 1k rounds through my AR without cleaning out the gas tube. i swab out the inside of the gas tube receiver on the bolt carrier with a q-tip every time i clean the rifle.

am i doing any harm by not sticking a pipe cleaner down the line?
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:08:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2005 9:08:51 PM EDT by P806]

Originally Posted By eWRXshun:
am i doing any harm by not sticking a pipe cleaner down the line?



You clean it everytime you squeeze the trigger. I've pulled out gas tubes that have had several thousand rounds through them and the insides were very clean.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:09:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2005 9:11:52 PM EDT by eodtech2000]
Don't worry about it. You stand a better chance of getting something stuck in your gas tube or the key on the bolt carrier trying to clean it with a qtip or pipecleaner. The only thing I have ever done with a gas tube is shoot carb cleaner thru the tube and to tell you the truth so little stuff came out as to this practice being a waste of good carb cleaner.

I think the only people I have heard plugging the gas system where shooting full auto or hard core bump fire addicts.

Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:10:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2005 9:10:50 PM EDT by 223semiauto]
It's called 11000 psi.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:12:41 PM EDT
i was under the impression that the gas tube is self cleaning due to the pressure the gas is being pushed at. I've never seen a manual that suggested cleaning the gas tube and I dont think the military trains for that either, so I wont either.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:12:57 PM EDT
thanks. that's exactly what i thought. i figured there was a reason for not describing a method to clean the gas tube in the instructions for cleaning that are in my manual.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:16:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 223semiauto:
It's called 11000 psi.



is that seriously the pressure in the gas system? i recall reading somewhere that the chamber pressure in the .223 is close to 40,000psi. i was astounded when i read that.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:30:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eWRXshun:

Originally Posted By 223semiauto:
It's called 11000 psi.



is that seriously the pressure in the gas system? i recall reading somewhere that the chamber pressure in the .223 is close to 40,000psi. i was astounded when i read that.



The chamber pressure is actually 55,000 PSI, Military ammo is usually a max load by reloading standards.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:52:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eWRXshun:

Originally Posted By 223semiauto:
It's called 11000 psi.



is that seriously the pressure in the gas system? i recall reading somewhere that the chamber pressure in the .223 is close to 40,000psi. i was astounded when i read that.



actually after some reading its more like 25000 for M193 and 13000 for M855.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 2:09:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 3:24:56 PM EDT
you do need to clean the gas tube, it does get dirty and that's why they make huge pipe cleaners, and that's only when you shoot blanks, when shooting regular ammo the pressure self cleans, there has been confusion in this because people have seen these tube cleaners and believe you need to clean them with regular ammo
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 3:38:38 PM EDT
The gas tube is self cleaning. Even if you use blanks. One or two rounds of regular ammo will blow any blank resiue right where Stoner intended -- directly into the working heart of the weapon!
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 4:26:14 PM EDT
I've been listening to this argument for thiry years now. Maybe I'm just dense, but just this minute a question popped into my tiny Armchair Commando mind.

Anyone ever stop to wonder how the gas tube is not supposed to ever need cleaning, due to the high pressure of the gas flowing through it, yet somehow, this high pressure stream turns filthy at the end of the tube, when entering the bolt carrier group? Like two inches further?

I never did until just now...

Dense.



Lonny
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 4:37:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BadgerArms:
The gas tube is self cleaning. Even if you use blanks. One or two rounds of regular ammo will blow any blank resiue right where Stoner intended -- directly into the working heart of the weapon!



Hey... it builds character.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 4:49:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 4:55:50 PM EDT by El_Roto]

Originally Posted By xcpd69:
I've been listening to this argument for thiry years now. Maybe I'm just dense, but just this minute a question popped into my tiny Armchair Commando mind.

Anyone ever stop to wonder how the gas tube is not supposed to ever need cleaning, due to the high pressure of the gas flowing through it, yet somehow, this high pressure stream turns filthy at the end of the tube, when entering the bolt carrier group? Like two inches further?

I never did until just now...

Dense.



Lonny


Because that's where all the lubrication is and it gets gummed up by all the carbon blow down the gas tube every time you pull the trigger - plus the stuff left behind in the chamber each time an old casing is pulled and a new round is inserted plus the dirt and grime of whatever environment you're operating in at the time....PHEW! Lots o' stuff, eh?

That's why you're not supposed to clean the gas tube: you're likely to leave lubricant/solvent behind which will attract carbon and lead to fouling in the tube...or breaking off a piece of one of those damn pipe cleaners and clogging it up.

Link Posted: 1/9/2005 5:10:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By xcpd69:
Anyone ever stop to wonder how the gas tube is not supposed to ever need cleaning, due to the high pressure of the gas flowing through it, yet somehow, this high pressure stream turns filthy at the end of the tube, when entering the bolt carrier group? Like two inches further?




Fluid dynamics.

In the gas tube, which is small, the gas retains high velocity and stays hot, blowing out anything that gets in, including whatever it might be carrying with it.

Once it gets into the expansion chamber inside the carrier, and inside the rest of the receiver, it expands, cools, and slows down, depositing all the carbon there.

Basically the same way a sound suppressor works. Or a fast, narrow river that widens out; the flow slows down and all the sand, rocks, etc. that were going along with it are now too heavy for the slower moving water to pick up, and gets dropped. See pictures of the Mississippi River delta basin as an example.

It's no real problem though, unless you like to do your examinations with white gloves and talk to your rifles.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 6:10:48 PM EDT
I was just taught by a Gun Smith that there is no reason to clean the tube. But when one is cleaning the bore always! Keep the gas tube on top. So there is no chance to get cleaners or oil in the tube. If for some reason one does get cleaners or oil in the tube then it needs to be addressed.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 6:18:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2005 6:22:00 PM EDT by GHPorter]

Originally Posted By gregw45:
img.photobucket.com/albums/v151/gregw45/pressure.jpg

+10! Wonderful data, and a great graphic too!

ETA Another reason not to do anything to the gas tube is that you could leave material in it that, unlike the air and combustion gasses does NOT compress. That means that, pushed by the port-pressure gasses, that non-compressible material will blast into your bolt carrier--and maybe your face.

Besides, how much does a gas tube cost? If it ever really gums up, just replace the bad boy.
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