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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/4/2005 2:57:41 PM EDT
I am about half-way with my first build. It is a Stag lower that is flawless, well almost. I noticed that after taking such care not to scratch anything big during assembly that I nicked the edges of the holes for the trigger/hammer retaining pins while pushing them in. The nicks are small but I still see them shining at me when I look at them. I asked a gunsmith friend and he suggested a Sharpie to cover it. That sounded a little hokey to me, or is that the easy and quick fix?



Link Posted: 8/4/2005 4:03:29 PM EDT
Birchwood-Casey flat black pen (about $4-$5) at most gun shops.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 4:22:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Raptor22:
Birchwood-Casey flat black pen (about $4-$5) at most gun shops.



Thanks, I'll pick one up in the morning
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 4:24:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Raptor22:
Birchwood-Casey flat black pen (about $4-$5) at most gun shops.



Works like a champ.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 5:40:45 PM EDT
I like to cover up the little nicks with larger gouges..
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 6:22:33 PM EDT
Once you touch up the tiny nicks gently place the rifle in a glass display case and set it on the fireplace mantle.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 6:26:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/4/2005 6:27:01 PM EDT by gus]
So if I scratch up a gun and decide to touch it up, that's somehow wrong? I don't do safe queens.

ETA: Range queens maybe...
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 6:26:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Stickman:
I like to cover up the little nicks with larger gouges..




...and dirt.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 6:28:06 PM EDT
Was just wondering the same thing last week. Thanks for asking for me!
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 6:31:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/4/2005 6:32:29 PM EDT by mongo001]
Oh, c'mon on guys, can't you see he's trying to protect his investment.............................











Sorry, I tried to keep a straight face when typing that.



Birchwood Casey Aluminum Black works better than the pen. Degrease and apply liberally. Let it dry and clean with CLP.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 6:34:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gus:
ETA: Range queens maybe...



Well isn't a range queen the opposite of a safe queen?
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 8:45:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mongo001:


Birchwood Casey Aluminum Black works better than the pen. Degrease and apply liberally. Let it dry and clean with CLP.



Thanks Mongo, I'll try it your way. BTW I became a wannabe machinist when I made a tool to install the pivot pin spring/detent out of an old cleaning rod.

Link Posted: 8/4/2005 8:48:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Stickman:
I like to cover up the little nicks with larger gouges..



+1

Works like a charm.
Can't even notice those little scratches anymore.





WIZZO
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 3:18:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By QUIB:

Originally Posted By gus:
ETA: Range queens maybe...



Well isn't a range queen the opposite of a safe queen?



Yeah, but my point was I'm not an "operator" or a cop or a soldier or a Marine or anything else that uses guns professionally. Hell, I'm an engineer for a telecom company! This is all a hobby for me, but I don't buy guns NOT to shoot them. If my guns were getting banged up due to being used in combat or in a professional capacity, they'd be too banged up for touchup anyway - and in that case, they would be scars born of honor. I see no point in taking pride in scratches and gouges that occur because of a little careless handling. That sounds like something a poser would do, really.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 6:24:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By gus:
That sounds like something a poser would do, really.



I'm a poser extraordinaire and damn proud of it. I have nothing to do with the military or police and yet I attend carbine and pistol courses. I hope to compete in active competition someday soon. Competition that at least in some small way would simulate real life scenarios. When I'm at the range and can do so, I practice things like tac and speed reloads, transition to my secondary weapon, hammers, NSRs, etc.

I am a poser.

It is my hobby.

Now, throw in a little martial arts training, and I'm a ninja poser, too.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 6:35:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/5/2005 6:37:02 AM EDT by gus]
Pose on, Brother!! I haven't taken any courses (yet), but obviously that would be another scenario where a gun would get beat up. If I ever do it, I won't be trying NOT to have my gun get banged up that's for sure!
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 6:41:12 AM EDT
I found a black Sharpie does just as well.
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 6:44:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By gus:
If I ever do it, I won't be trying NOT to have my gun get banged up that's for sure!



Depending on which class you take, it may not be an option. No one tries to bang up their weapons, it just happens if you choose to step off the bench and really start shooting your ARs.
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 7:03:50 AM EDT
neglect is one thing but real use is another
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 9:06:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/7/2005 9:44:03 AM EDT by die-tryin]


This is the nice perty b4 pic.



2000 rounds of real use......



About the only AR I would treat as a safe queen would be a NIB 60s vintage SP1. Otherwise, they are jus tools. I dont abuse my ARs, but I shoot them, I am also careful when setting them done and not purposely banging them around. But with time they will show some wear.
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 9:29:34 AM EDT
Aluminum , even anodized aluminum is a soft metal
It will show wear with normal use . That's why its a poor
material choice for a tool .

The AR design is a trade off , It's light weigh comes
at the expense of surface damage and a somewhat fragile
ductile strength .

You can touch up the dings as others have suggested , but
you're better off using that one as your shooter and buying
a safe queen to fondle .

Personally , I like the used look
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