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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 1/2/2006 10:26:39 PM EDT
Posted this before, but it's in the Archives. Thought I'd repost it to bump it:

I've tried this a few times, and it works. I'm wondering if it's a secret or just not important enough to get that much attention. The guns I've tried this in are my 1911 pistol, a few AR-15's and a few AK-47 clones. Here's what I do:

First, unload and clear all weapons.

For the 1911: I put a drop of break-free at the front of the hammer when it's cocked so it goes down into the sear engagement surfaces. Pressing firmly on the rear of the hammer, I pull the trigger. The pressure is not hard enough to keep me from pulling, only makes the trigger much firmer. I do this about ten times and it results in a lighter, smoother pull.

AR-15: I shotgun the rifle and place a piece of cardboard over the rear of the lower receiver to protect it. With the hammer resting forward, place a drop of break-free on the sear engagement surface which is a ledge at the bottom of the hammer. I take a pen and wrap a rubber band around both ends. The pen acts as a stop to keep the hammer from striking the bolt hold-open and damaging the receiver. I then use a medium-sized flat-head screwdriver wedged behind the hammer and using the cardboard-backed receiver as a fulcrum, leverage pressure on the rear of the hammer. WARNING!!! Do not use too much force. You can apply a great deal of pressure, but you don't need to. If you can't pull the trigger, it's way too much force. You're looking at stiffening the trigger pull significantly, not breaking anything. Again, pull the trigger 10 times with the extra force, resetting the hammer each time of course.



AK-47: Remove the receiver cover, spring, and any scope you might have that can get in the way. With the hammer resting against the bolt, place a drop of oil on each side of the hammer where the sear engagement surfaces contact the hammer (or one side if it's a single-hook). WARNING!!! When you pull trigger, the hammer will fly forward with significant force to fling the excess oil all over the place. Use eye protection and place a rag or paper-towel over the hammer when you pull the trigger. Also, don't take out the Bolt or bolt carrier. The hammer needs something to hit or else it will fly too far forward. Apply force between the hammer and disconnector with your flat-head screwdriver again. Remember not to apply too-much force, you can do damage if you do. The goal is to increase the pressure on the sear surface(s) of the hammer and trigger. Pull the trigger 10 times with the additionally pressure, resetting the hammer each time again.



Why does it work? The extra pressure applied to the hammer smashes the mating surfaces together and greatly increases the pressure on any burrs, roughness, or irregularities. When the trigger is pulled, it burnishes or polishes the surface. The oil acts just like honing oil would on a sharpening stone in that it carries freed particles away from the area and allows the surfaces to move with less friction. Imagine rubbing two rough stones together. Eventually, they will mate and create a rather smooth surface on each. You are doing this faster.

What you are doing is essentially accelerating wear on those surfaces and letting them mate together. On most guns, especially new ones, you should see smoother and lighter pulls. They are lighter because there is less friction involved in the total pull weight, not because of any reduction in spring tension.

What it doesn’t do: Well, for one it doesn’t hurt anything if you do it right. It doesn't change the geometry or spring pressure; it just breaks the parts in. Garage-gunsmiths often use dremmel tools, sharpening stones, sandpaper, files, hammers, chisels, hatchets, butcher knives, and vice grips to accomplish ‘trigger jobs’ at home. You don’t need to do this… leave it to a professional. If you want it smoother, try my method and save yourself a trip to the gunsmith when you break something.

Let's say you do break something. The hammer and trigger cost money, yes, but they are cheaper to replace than ONE trip to the gunsmith to try and get a better trigger pull. The last thread I posted on this had some interesting comments. Feel free to read up on it:

archive.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=118&t=216640&page=1
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 10:29:17 PM EDT
great bump BadgerArms, thanks!

dont suppose you know how to imporve a stock HK USP trigger...?
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 10:34:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/3/2006 7:32:02 AM EDT by BadgerArms]
Yes, the single action can be boosted just like the instructions state. Put oil down into the hammer/sear mating surfaces, push forward on the trigger with thumb pressure, and pull. I do it to most pistols with good results. After you've had 2-3,000 rounds through the gun, you probably have already got your mating surfaces burnished, so this trick won't help you any.
Link Posted: 1/2/2006 10:37:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BadgerArms:
Yes, the single action can be boosted just like the instructions state. Put oil down into the hammer/sear mating surfaces, push forward on the trigger with thumb pressure, and pull. I do it most pistols with good results. After you've had 2-3,000 rounds through the gun, you probably have already got your mating surfaces burnished, so this trick won't help you any.



thanks Badger! (i only have ~200 through it so far, and i think that the previous owner had less than that)
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 1:27:12 AM EDT
Bump to the top for others.

Works great. Just did it to my Bushmaster M4gery and 11.5 Frankencarbine. The Bushmaster improved noticeably and the latter was down right impressive. The trigger was horrible on the 11.5 now it's much smoother.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 12:43:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BadgerArms:
Yes, the single action can be boosted just like the instructions state. Put oil down into the hammer/sear mating surfaces, push forward on the trigger HAMMER with thumb pressure, and pull. I do it to most pistols with good results. After you've had 2-3,000 rounds through the gun, you probably have already got your mating surfaces burnished, so this trick won't help you any.


It's the HAMMER that you push forward on while you pull the trigger. Again, if you can't pull the trigger, you're pushing the hammer too hard.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 1:41:11 PM EDT
Thanks!
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