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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 2/18/2006 6:14:26 PM EDT
Just noticing in a lot of pictures that people have their safeties engaged. I tend to store my weapons discharged, which prevents activation of the safety. So the question is, do you guys store you ARs charged or not? I tend to look to my P2K or 1911 for home safety. However, I might be tempted to grab the AR pistol if I had some frangible ammo (that would not worry me about going though a couple of walls hitting a neighbor's kid). What are the consequences for storing ARs in charged state for long periods?
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 6:21:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kozmic:
What are the consequences for storing ARs in charged state for long periods?



Nothing negative.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 6:33:17 PM EDT
If you look at some of the research done (and this had been beaten to death I think), you'll find that the .223 may be one of the safest rounds you can use for home defense. It'll stop in walls better than a 9mm round (and it's more effective at putting guys down). I think it's pretty close to the perfect home defense weapon with xm193 (I even use the frangible Ranger rounds, as you suggested you might do) and a flashlight attached.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 6:39:14 PM EDT
I agree and would not break into an ARFCOM'ers house....ever.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 6:43:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CTKurt:
I agree and would not break into an ARFCOM'ers house....ever.



+1



Nathan
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:01:42 PM EDT
So no long term effects on the buffer spring? What worries me is that after months (years) of being charged, it won't feed well. Although I guess with regular feeding, this problem would present itself at the range long before a situation where my life depended on a second round.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:05:03 PM EDT
You don't have to lock the carrier to the rear to put the weapon on safe. Just charge the weapon leaving the carrier forward. Springs die from use not compression.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:08:50 PM EDT
That is true... Okay - you can offically call me ignant...

I guess I am just being overly concerned.

Thanks for the head-butt, I needed it.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:09:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bradd_D:
You don't have to lock the carrier to the rear to put the weapon on safe. Just charge the weapon leaving the carrier forward. Springs die from use not compression.



+1 I just have my carrier foward, safety on.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:09:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:12:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/18/2006 7:15:48 PM EDT by kozmic]

Originally Posted By Troy:
I store my ARs bolt-forward, hammer down.



So, nothing in the chamber and no safety?

Cleared, bolt-forward, and hammer down is how I always store mine too. But this makes for a poor defense config. Then again, the P2K and 1911 are still much easy to handle in the dark. (they too are stored hammer down, however they are both chambered - DA on the P2K and a simple thumb pull on the 1911 and it is good to go)
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:14:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kozmic:
Just noticing in a lot of pictures that people have their safeties engaged. I tend to store my weapons discharged, which prevents activation of the safety. So the question is, do you guys store you ARs charged or not? I tend to look to my P2K or 1911 for home safety. However, I might be tempted to grab the AR pistol if I had some frangible ammo (that would not worry me about going though a couple of walls hitting a neighbor's kid). What are the consequences for storing ARs in charged state for long periods?



Topic beat to death here: www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=118&t=267675
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:18:07 PM EDT
Okay, so call this the 1001st time its been asked... sorry about that.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:18:42 PM EDT
locked and loaded
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:20:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kozmic:
Okay, so call this the 1001st time its been asked... sorry about that.



Don't worry... I was the noob who asked that time.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 7:37:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thanegrooms:
Don't worry... I was the noob who asked that time.



Well, I'm no noob to either ARs or this board, but I also have never considered my AR a primary home defense weapon with standard rounds (solid or soft tip). However, with frangible stuff getting cheaper and tests showing they are easily stopped by household walls, I would be much more inclined to do so. But again, as mentioned by many in your other thread, I like to have my 'defense' weapon chambered hammer-down. With my hand guns this adds no extra wear and tear on the weapon. On my ARs, it seemingly would.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 8:13:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kozmic:

Originally Posted By thanegrooms:
Don't worry... I was the noob who asked that time.



Well, I'm no noob to either ARs or this board, but I also have never considered my AR a primary home defense weapon with standard rounds (solid or soft tip). However, with frangible stuff getting cheaper and tests showing they are easily stopped by household walls, I would be much more inclined to do so. But again, as mentioned by many in your other thread, I like to have my 'defense' weapon chambered hammer-down. With my hand guns this adds no extra wear and tear on the weapon. On my ARs, it seemingly would.




"I was the noob"... not inferring anyone else.

As for frangibles... I wouldn't volunteer to stand on the other side of 2 pieces of sheet rock for anything traveling 3200 fps. Heck, I can push my finger through it at 5 fps.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 8:18:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thanegrooms:
Heck, I can push my finger through it at 5 fps.



lol - True... But I am more conserned about rounds leaving my house (through an intruder, then sheet rock then brick ).
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 4:52:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WilsonCQB1911:
If you look at some of the research done (and this had been beaten to death I think), you'll find that the .223 may be one of the safest rounds you can use for home defense. It'll stop in walls better than a 9mm round (and it's more effective at putting guys down).



Apparently not in FMJ though...

Link Posted: 2/21/2006 5:10:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bradd_D:
You don't have to lock the carrier to the rear to put the weapon on safe. Just charge the weapon leaving the carrier forward. Springs die from use not compression.




Why do mag springs from being stored loaded?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 5:23:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bushHK:

Originally Posted By Bradd_D:
You don't have to lock the carrier to the rear to put the weapon on safe. Just charge the weapon leaving the carrier forward. Springs die from use not compression.




Why do mag springs from being stored loaded?



They dont.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 5:26:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bushHK:

Originally Posted By Bradd_D:
You don't have to lock the carrier to the rear to put the weapon on safe. Just charge the weapon leaving the carrier forward. Springs die from use not compression.




Why do mag springs from being stored loaded?



Loading mags to full capacity will decrease the life of the spring due to maximum compression, but if you download a round or two, you can keep mags loaded for a very long time. When I said compression I was referring to pressure on the spring and not full compression.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 5:49:35 PM EDT
when I want it to be available for defense, I keep a mag in the well, bolt locked back safety on. Should the need arise, all I have to do is hit the bolt hold open and flip the safety
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 5:56:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kozmic:

Originally Posted By WilsonCQB1911:
If you look at some of the research done (and this had been beaten to death I think), you'll find that the .223 may be one of the safest rounds you can use for home defense. It'll stop in walls better than a 9mm round (and it's more effective at putting guys down).



Apparently not in FMJ though...

img84.imageshack.us/img84/3593/hole1my.jpg



It doesnt matter what it initially does, it matters what happens afterwards when you are talking about overpenetration. I guarantee you that round disintegrated after leaving that hole (you can almost see parts of the jackets on the edge of the hole).
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:31:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WilsonCQB1911:
If you look at some of the research done (and this had been beaten to death I think), you'll find that the .223 may be one of the safest rounds you can use for home defense. It'll stop in walls better than a 9mm round (and it's more effective at putting guys down). I think it's pretty close to the perfect home defense weapon with xm193 (I even use the frangible Ranger rounds, as you suggested you might do) and a flashlight attached.



True, but .556 can still penetrate a lot of walls and deviate way off course. Still it's way safer than 9mm and 45ACP.

This example passed thru 4 walls:
http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot14.htm

This example stopped at the 3rd wall:
http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot12.htm

Just be sure of your target and what is beyond it.

(Box of truth rules)
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 5:06:00 AM EDT
i would disagree that springs dont weaken from constant compression....maybe high quality springs but cheap springs will get memory...if not then I see no other reason why a set of cheap magazines for a 1911 would allow the follower to rattle after being loaded for a year when unloaded ones were tight to top of mag...

Then again I am sure someone will prove to me how this is just urban legend passed down through the ranks of the military for years and years to us unsuspecting recruits and we completed the vicious cycle.

To this day I rotate my loaded mags in my defense weapons once a month.....and shoot my ammo up every 2 years at most. I just like fresh ammo and fresh magazines...
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 9:07:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kozmic:

Originally Posted By WilsonCQB1911:
If you look at some of the research done (and this had been beaten to death I think), you'll find that the .223 may be one of the safest rounds you can use for home defense. It'll stop in walls better than a 9mm round (and it's more effective at putting guys down).



Apparently not in FMJ though...

img84.imageshack.us/img84/3593/hole1my.jpg



Thats either a very small pipe, or a very large .223.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 6:56:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LOW2000:

Originally Posted By kozmic:

Originally Posted By WilsonCQB1911:
If you look at some of the research done (and this had been beaten to death I think), you'll find that the .223 may be one of the safest rounds you can use for home defense. It'll stop in walls better than a 9mm round (and it's more effective at putting guys down).



Apparently not in FMJ though...

img84.imageshack.us/img84/3593/hole1my.jpg



Thats either a very small pipe, or a very large .223.



Don't know - it was posted by someone in the offical AR picture thread number 11. It appeared to be a fence pole.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 7:34:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/5/2006 7:37:22 PM EDT by JosephR]
That's Black-x's picture. 62 gr. Wolf FMJ. It's on page 4 of the picture thread.





You can DEFINITELY see copper jacket from 12 all the way around to 5:30-ish.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 9:03:45 PM EDT
Yup - point was that it made for a bad home defense round.

I would only use fragibles in my house for a 5.56 home defense weapon (probably in my AR pistol).
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